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Old 01-27-2010, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Boston MA, by way of NYC
2,768 posts, read 4,197,697 times
Reputation: 464

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ♥♥PRINC3Ss♥♥ View Post
Yuck. Why can't the city hire people to clean that stuff? I understand the system is old but I doubt it cannot be cleaner. Our metrorail as far as I remember (haven't used it in years) is cleaner than that. I was born in Colombia and they build a rail like 20 years ago but people there are so proud of it. They treat it like their child and it's so clean you could eat off the floor. I think if people see you throwing garbage or writing on the walls, they will gang against you and beat you up. I hate dirty people with a passion. Over here some people just don't have any sense of community.

I have heard that during the hiphop weekend we get a lot tourists that just throw garbage on the streets. I guess that's how they behave in their own towns. I lived in NYC for a very short time and I remember hating it.

They lain there is no money - but I don't know where it goes - there are potholes that if your car hit it you would end up in jersey - terrible - people Are gross - princess - they don't have sense of community - - I'm not a litter bug and I do not allow my children to be either - I'm just not built for NYC - it is time for me to go.

 
Old 01-27-2010, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,614 posts, read 3,731,402 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
Mister - you said it all you think it is over rated to own a home - the problem with the real estate has a lot to do witht he morons who thought buying a home for 600k was smart and had know way to really pay that and a lot of that falls on people from the ne who thought they were getting deals because they would have paid 1.5 mil in ny boroughs for something similar not the same NYC is just not set up in a way where you can put the aprtment complexes the way they have in Florida -
Very true. The thing that kills me is people down here who made way less than people in NYC that bought houses that were not worth crap. My parents bought 3 houses here in the mid 90s, after selling a property in NY. Do you know how much they paid for them?

The main one they live in, they paid ~$200k (5br/3ba/3cg), people were offering them $700k for the same house in 2003/2004. It's crazy. And many of these people were Floridians,not just people from the N.E. (The other two were purchased for: ($117k -3/2-2cg that they sold for a bit over $400k), and the one I rent from them, they got it for $130k, a 4/2.5/2 cg.).

Salaries did not go up fast enough for people in So Fla to be clamoring over these houses, as if they could buy them. People down here let the market go out of hand. It's their fault. People control the market, not the other way around.

Quote:
I don't think that I would go as far as to say that I would work at a gas station etc, but I do know a friend who works at a law firm in Miami and lives a life style very similar to mine but has a much nicer apartment that she owns. She has everything I have minus broadway shows but she couldn't afford that when she lived here either.
I agree with you. It's all relative though. I can give examples of people that I know who left for Texas, and live in houses twice the size of what they had in South Florida, for way less, while their pay was better. It's all relative my dear.

Quote:
tell people in Springfield gardens they don't need a car - they might cut you.
I know people who live in Laurelton without a car, and they have yet to cut me.

Quote:
Mister some people do move for environment - you can't really argue that. I know you lived here but I think you have a different mind set - things to you are very rosey here - and I don't hate NYC - I like a lot of things about it but I do think I can find a lot of nicer things in another area. Things that make your life feel better. I mean can you honestly say that walking out in to either Georgia or Florida doesn't look nicer than wlking out onto a street that just looks like no one gives a crap?
I guess you're right. Having lived in Brooklyn Heights, things can get rosey..lmao. But we must also be fair. Someone living in Hialeah would not be so shocked if they moved to some places in NYC. Hialeah is crappy by my standards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
Hey Mister, all is well for now! I here ya - the only difference is quality of life - my strong opinion is that quality of life is mush higher there in comparison to what we offer here. 150k - I don't make much more than that here so, it surprises me that you say that much is need to just live a decent life - I make 85k a year - I won't make that I Florida, I have been worked with an agent that has been giving me options in the high 50's low 60's - now it is just deciding which is the best fit and gettig me hired lol.

I don't think things are as rosey as the other guy thinks but I can see where he is coming from when he says that Miami offers a better life than NYC.
Again better life is relative. Some care about the beach and palm trees, while other care about working, getting paid well, and having amenities close by, and no need for a car. What makes one happy, may not for someone else.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,614 posts, read 3,731,402 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
They lain there is no money - but I don't know where it goes - there are potholes that if your car hit it you would end up in jersey - terrible - people Are gross - princess - they don't have sense of community - - I'm not a litter bug and I do not allow my children to be either - I'm just not built for NYC - it is time for me to go.
Since, I will be moving to Atlanta permanently in a few months, do you want to buy my parents' other house? It's very nice, and they may give you a good deal 4BR/2.5ba/2 CG. The yard is small by my standards, but you may like it.

I think, they'd rather sell it than becoming landlords, to strangers. They're getting too old for that. None of their kids like Florida, and I'm the last one here.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Boston MA, by way of NYC
2,768 posts, read 4,197,697 times
Reputation: 464
Where and does it have a pool? As for amenities in NYC they are non existent without extra cashflow - and your friends in laurelton hate the buses as much as the floridians do and if they say differnt I say they are lying - I have met only one person in my Large circle to say they like mass transit and have never met anyone to say they liked it who lived that far out.

I wish you luck in ga.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:02 PM
 
248 posts, read 313,987 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by ♥♥PRINC3Ss♥♥ View Post
Also comparing salaries is useless if you are not looking at the actual number of jobs available for certain industries. Most corporations do not invest in Miami when there are cheaper places in TX, AZ, CO or more global cities like NYC and LA. Some people say is the lack of talent that prevents companies from moving here. I'm not really sure which caused which.

Of course if your plan is to work a minimum wage part-time job, Publix is always hiring and they are one of the largest employers in Miami. Just don't expect to get a full time position in the next 5 years.
Quite simply not true. The data shows otherwise. Especially for MisterNY. He's all about posting anecdotal evidence. In the other thread about blacks in Miami or Atlanta where he is right he wants data not examples. But here when he is wrong he wants examples not data.

To your comment about jobs. Where are you getting your information from.

Here is the Bureau of labor statistics info for Miami:

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL Economy at a Glance

And here they are for New York:

New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA Economy at a Glance

Here are the sectors broken out and the percentage of jobs in that sector:

Sector - Miami - New York

Mining, Logging & Construction - 4% - 4%
Manufacturing - 4% - 5%
Trade, Transportation & Utilities - 23% - 19%
Information - 2% - 3%
Financial Activities - 7% - 9%
Professional and Business Services - 15% - 15%
Education & Health Services - 15% - 18%
Leisure & Hospitality - 11% - 8%
Other Services - 5% - 4%
Government - 14% - 15%

Unemployment -10.6% - 8.9%
Consumer Price Index -222.943 - 238.427

Obviously there are more jobs in NY because there are more people! But when you look at the percentages of those jobs it becomes clear that Miami is not that far off.

Every single sector is within 4%.

Here is even more detailed information

Management Occupations

NY - 5% with average salary of $130,140.
MIA - 3% with average salary of $110, 480.

Business and Financial Operations

NY - 5% with average salary of $81,440
MIA - 5% with average salary of $60,910

Computer and Mathematical Science

NY - 3% with average salary of $83,950
MIA - 2% with average salary of $65,290

Architecture and Engineering Occupations

NY - 1% with average salary of $78,090
MIA - 1% with average salary of $62,570

Legal Occupations

NY - 1% with average salary of $117,450
MIA - 1% with average salary of $89,180

Education, Training and Library

NY - 7% with average salary of $58,280
MIA - 5% with average salary of $45,430

Healthcare Practicioner and Technical Occupations

NY - 5% with average salary of $81,550
MIA - 5% with average salary of $67,300

Healthcare Support Occupations

NY - 3% with average salary of $28,610
MIA - 3% with average salary of $25,070

Protective Services (Police, Fire, etc)

NY - 3% with average salary of $47,070
MIA - 3% with average salary of $36,550

Food Preparation on Services

NY - 6% with average salary of $24,620
MIA - 8% with average salary of $21,130

Personal Care and Services

NY - 3% with average salary of $28,530
MIA - 3% with average salary of $25,170

Sales and Related Occupations

NY - 11% with average salary of $48,200
MIA - 13% with average salary of $39,130

Office and Administrative Support

NY - 19% with average salary of $36,630
MIA - 21% with average salary of $$30,130

Construction and Extraction Occupations

NY - 4% with average salary of $57,840
MIA - 4% with average salary of $37,230

Installation Maintenance and Repair

NY - 3% with average salary of $46,700
MIA - 4% with average salary of $38,380

Production Occupations

NY - 4% with average salary of $33, 410
MIA - 4% with average salary of $28,190

Transportation and Material Moving Occupations

NY - 6% with average salary of $35,920
MIA - 7% with average salary of $34,600

Not only does Miami have the same percentage of professional jobs as NY but when you take the cost of living into consideration in all cases you would come out positive.

It's supply and demand. NY has more demand than Miami so in order to maintain a job in Miami an employer will need to pay more after looking at the cost of living.

For example Minneapolis has 19 fortune 500 companies. After you factor in the cost of living you would have more disposable income (with a smaller salary) in Minneapolis than either Miami or NY. That is because these companies understand that someone in Miami or NY will actually take a job in a situation where even though they make more, they have less disposable income because of the desire to live in a place that is in high demand.

If disposable income was higher in places that were higher in demand then everyone would simply move to those places. The less desirable places have to increase wages to compete.

I understand that you live in Miami and see the problems everyday. I do NOT doubt that these are legitimate problems. But by the same token I live in DC and NY and see those problems as well. I'm sure everyone here can give an example to support their view. But lets please look at the actual data to get an idea of what the facts are.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Boston MA, by way of NYC
2,768 posts, read 4,197,697 times
Reputation: 464
Great post - I hope it rings true for me!


Quote:
Originally Posted by gixxer1000 View Post
Quite simply not true. The data shows otherwise. Especially for MisterNY. He's all about posting anecdotal evidence. In the other thread about blacks in Miami or Atlanta where he is right he wants data not examples. But here when he is wrong he wants examples not data.

To your comment about jobs. Where are you getting your information from.

Here is the Bureau of labor statistics info for Miami:

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL Economy at a Glance

And here they are for New York:

New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA Economy at a Glance

Here are the sectors broken out and the percentage of jobs in that sector:

Sector - Miami - New York

Mining, Logging & Construction - 4% - 4%
Manufacturing - 4% - 5%
Trade, Transportation & Utilities - 23% - 19%
Information - 2% - 3%
Financial Activities - 7% - 9%
Professional and Business Services - 15% - 15%
Education & Health Services - 15% - 18%
Leisure & Hospitality - 11% - 8%
Other Services - 5% - 4%
Government - 14% - 15%

Unemployment -10.6% - 8.9%
Consumer Price Index -222.943 - 238.427

Obviously there are more jobs in NY because there are more people! But when you look at the percentages of those jobs it becomes clear that Miami is not that far off.

Every single sector is within 4%.

Here is even more detailed information

Management Occupations

NY - 5% with average salary of $130,140.
MIA - 3% with average salary of $110, 480.

Business and Financial Operations

NY - 5% with average salary of $81,440
MIA - 5% with average salary of $60,910

Computer and Mathematical Science

NY - 3% with average salary of $83,950
MIA - 2% with average salary of $65,290

Architecture and Engineering Occupations

NY - 1% with average salary of $78,090
MIA - 1% with average salary of $62,570

Legal Occupations

NY - 1% with average salary of $117,450
MIA - 1% with average salary of $89,180

Education, Training and Library

NY - 7% with average salary of $58,280
MIA - 5% with average salary of $45,430

Healthcare Practicioner and Technical Occupations

NY - 5% with average salary of $81,550
MIA - 5% with average salary of $67,300

Healthcare Support Occupations

NY - 3% with average salary of $28,610
MIA - 3% with average salary of $25,070

Protective Services (Police, Fire, etc)

NY - 3% with average salary of $47,070
MIA - 3% with average salary of $36,550

Food Preparation on Services

NY - 6% with average salary of $24,620
MIA - 8% with average salary of $21,130

Personal Care and Services

NY - 3% with average salary of $28,530
MIA - 3% with average salary of $25,170

Sales and Related Occupations

NY - 11% with average salary of $48,200
MIA - 13% with average salary of $39,130

Office and Administrative Support

NY - 19% with average salary of $36,630
MIA - 21% with average salary of $$30,130

Construction and Extraction Occupations

NY - 4% with average salary of $57,840
MIA - 4% with average salary of $37,230

Installation Maintenance and Repair

NY - 3% with average salary of $46,700
MIA - 4% with average salary of $38,380

Production Occupations

NY - 4% with average salary of $33, 410
MIA - 4% with average salary of $28,190

Transportation and Material Moving Occupations

NY - 6% with average salary of $35,920
MIA - 7% with average salary of $34,600

Not only does Miami have the same percentage of professional jobs as NY but when you take the cost of living into consideration in all cases you would come out positive.

It's supply and demand. NY has more demand than Miami so in order to maintain a job in Miami an employer will need to pay more after looking at the cost of living.

For example Minneapolis has 19 fortune 500 companies. After you factor in the cost of living you would have more disposable income (with a smaller salary) in Minneapolis than either Miami or NY. That is because these companies understand that someone in Miami or NY will actually take a job in a situation where even though they make more, they have less disposable income because of the desire to live in a place that is in high demand.

If disposable income was higher in places that were higher in demand then everyone would simply move to those places. The less desirable places have to increase wages to compete.

I understand that you live in Miami and see the problems everyday. I do NOT doubt that these are legitimate problems. But by the same token I live in DC and NY and see those problems as well. I'm sure everyone here can give an example to support their view. But lets please look at the actual data to get an idea of what the facts are.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:20 PM
 
248 posts, read 313,987 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
I don't think things are as rosey as the other guy thinks but I can see where he is coming from when he says that Miami offers a better life than NYC.
Chelsa1075,

Please do not misunderstand me. I do not think things are all "rosey" in Miami. Like any major city I'm sure it has problems. I have just had the opportunity to live in many cities so I understand that these problems exist in most of them and people tend to decide which cities are harder, dirtier, have more crime, etc. based on their personal experiences and the experiences of those they've interacted with instead of looking at averages.

The same way more people are afraid to fly yet have no problem not wearing a seatbelt on the way to the airport where you're much more likely to be die.

I have lower middle class family in NY and in Miami and both of them think they have it worse off.

The majority of the problems with Miami are because it's a large city. If you want to escape these problems then you need to move to a place like Columbus, Oh. The night life will suck and your entire world will revolve around the Ohio State Buckeyes, but it will be easier to hold steady employment, own a home, etc.

But if you're struggling in Miami, moving to NY is NOT going to improve your situation.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,614 posts, read 3,731,402 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
Where and does it have a pool? As for amenities in NYC they are non existent without extra cashflow - and your friends in laurelton hate the buses as much as the floridians do and if they say differnt I say they are lying - I have met only one person in my Large circle to say they like mass transit and have never met anyone to say they liked it who lived that far out.

I wish you luck in ga.

Thank you. I'm loving it there already.

The house does not have a pool, but the subdivision has one. It would make no sense to get a pool if one is already available. Plus pool maintenance is another burden. Add that to your monthly maintenance bill, if you want one. (Give or take $75-125/month for a company to clean it and add bleach tabs, etc). I'm glad the HOA fee takes care of it.

About my friends,
Why would they lie? One of them doesn't even have a driver's license, because she doesn't drive. They're doing fine. People change what they don't like. If they couldn't stand it, with the money they make, they'd move closer to the city or get a car.
It's not like there are parking problems in Laurelton to begin with. Also people will complain about something they have, only to miss it when it's gone. Hence many people from developed cities and countries, who are used to mass transit, moving to Miami.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 02:48 PM
 
1,895 posts, read 3,033,965 times
Reputation: 753
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterNY View Post
Thank you. I'm loving it there already.

The house does not have a pool, but the subdivision has one. It would make no sense to get a pool if one is already available. Plus pool maintenance is another burden. Add that to your monthly maintenance bill, if you want one. (Give or take $75-125/month for a company to clean it and add bleach tabs, etc). I'm glad the HOA fee takes care of it.

About my friends,
Why would they lie? One of them doesn't even have a driver's license, because she doesn't drive. They're doing fine. People change what they don't like. If they couldn't stand it, with the money they make, they'd move closer to the city or get a car.
It's not like there are parking problems in Laurelton to begin with. Also people will complain about something they have, only to miss it when it's gone. Hence many people from developed cities and countries, who are used to mass transit, moving to Miami.
Mister, I'm not sure why you're making Miami out to be so backward because it's not very accessible in terms of public transport. There's only a handful of cities in the US that I'd put in that category (NY, Chicago, Boston, maybe a couple of others like SF, DC, and Philly to an extent). It's just a fact that most major cities in the US are car dependent due to a primarily suburban nature, be it Atlanta, Denver, Houston, Phoenix, LA, Seattle, etc. And for that reason and others, why are we comparing NYC to Miami? Apples and oranges.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,614 posts, read 3,731,402 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyers29 View Post
Mister, I'm not sure why you're making Miami out to be so backward because it's not very accessible in terms of public transport. There's only a handful of cities in the US that I'd put in that category (NY, Chicago, Boston, maybe a couple of others like SF, DC, and Philly to an extent). It's just a fact that most major cities in the US are car dependent due to a primarily suburban nature, be it Atlanta, Denver, Houston, Phoenix, LA, Seattle, etc. And for that reason and others, why are we comparing NYC to Miami? Apples and oranges.
IF that's the case, you better address this to me, Gixxer, Chelsa, and everyone else here. Everyone on this thread is making a comparison to some other place. I'm not the only one. Address it to everyone, not just me.

And, yes when it comes to public transportation, Miami is indeed backward. If you want to call it a world class city with horrible mass transportation (in comparison to NY, DC, Chicago etc), yes in that aspect, it is backward. No doubt about it. You and I both know that. Your post said it clearly.
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