U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-25-2017, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Louisville
4,278 posts, read 4,048,316 times
Reputation: 7238

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
An interesting stat I saw in Detroit News today indicated that from March 2016 to March 2017 the number of active residential accounts in the city increased by 3,000. This coupled with 1,098 new residential unit permits indicates that the population decline of July 2015 to July 2016 is either non-representative of what was occuring between 16-17 (unlikely), or that the annual population estimates are biased toward historical trends and do not sufficiently reflect the actual population and demographic activity within the city of Detroit, in 2017 (more likely). I believe this may apply to Wayne County as a whole as I find it hard to believe that Livonia and Plymouth are shrinking based on the amount of construction activity (both residential and retail) I see when I'm out there.
One thing that may be contributing to population declines in those cities is shrinking home sizes as the population continues to mature.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-25-2017, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,640 posts, read 7,442,873 times
Reputation: 3747
The colors are based on percent changes from 2010.

https://mike63wilk.carto.com/viz/491...68f/public_map

Interactive map: See population changes in your community | Crain's Detroit Business

Michigan has an interesting population growth belt following the I-96 corridor (sans Detroit and most of Wayne County). There's also some modest growth around Marquette and some pretty decent growth around Traverse City.

Also what's going on in the Thumb region (especially Sanilac County) that makes it seems like the population loss is so great there? I can understand the UP and parts of northern Michigan where clearly defined economies have sputtered aside from tourism, but I've never heard too much about the Thumb region.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2017, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids Metro
8,885 posts, read 18,035,179 times
Reputation: 3882
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
The colors are based on percent changes from 2010.

https://mike63wilk.carto.com/viz/491...68f/public_map

Interactive map: See population changes in your community | Crain's Detroit Business

Michigan has an interesting population growth belt following the I-96 corridor (sans Detroit and most of Wayne County). There's also some modest growth around Marquette and some pretty decent growth around Traverse City.

Also what's going on in the Thumb region (especially Sanilac County) that makes it seems like the population loss is so great there? I can understand the UP and parts of northern Michigan where clearly defined economies have sputtered aside from tourism, but I've never heard too much about the Thumb region.
I read an article on this that the thumb and the rural parts of Northern lower peninsula are losing a lot of their young people. Most high schoolers move downstate after they graduate and never go back. The average age in those counties is quite a bit higher than the larger metro areas (and the poverty is pretty high).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, Kansas
758 posts, read 1,021,856 times
Reputation: 739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
... or underestimated in 2010? I worked census in 2010 for an inner-city area (Ogden, Utah) and we were more or less advised to skip homes that made us uncomfortable and mark them as vacant if they appeared to be. We were told to do this because under-counting was less of a problem than being in a dangerous situation. I of course agree with this, but it's worth considering with a city like Detroit where blight was much worse in 2010, large numbers of people live in homes which appear unoccupied, and high insurance rates cause some to claim residence in nearby communities. Trying to peg the population of a large, sprawling city with economic challenges like Detroit (or Ogden) is a lot more difficult than collecting data on the population of Sterling Heights.
This is what happened in my hometown where over 2000 people are estimated to have been not counted because the census workers weren't doing their job. The city was furious when the results came back showing a population loss of like 2000 people with the senses workers claiming that two large chunks of the town were empty. A large income-based apartment complex that isn't scary in the least, and a large trailer park built by a BP in the 1980s that isn't well-kept, but isn't scary during daylight at all. The census claimed like five people were living in the trailer park.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 09:36 PM
 
124 posts, read 114,740 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
An interesting stat I saw in Detroit News today indicated that from March 2016 to March 2017 the number of active residential accounts in the city increased by 3,000. This coupled with 1,098 new residential unit permits indicates that the population decline of July 2015 to July 2016 is either non-representative of what was occuring between 16-17 (unlikely), or that the annual population estimates are biased toward historical trends and do not sufficiently reflect the actual population and demographic activity within the city of Detroit, in 2017 (more likely). I believe this may apply to Wayne County as a whole as I find it hard to believe that Livonia and Plymouth are shrinking based on the amount of construction activity (both residential and retail) I see when I'm out there.
Their methodology contained a variable of tracking demolition permits. Considering the city's demolition program funded by the fed, this is a huge red flag and a massive negative bias in their method. I'm not surprised things aren't adding up.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top