U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-22-2011, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,756,136 times
Reputation: 4611

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmlowman View Post
I've lived in southern California for 35 years and have not heard any Californians speak this way. Most annoying here is the Valley Girl/surfer dude-speak.

California is just the opposite. In the teens and 20s, it's like a speed-talking contest. That, and slurring syllables and words together.
I agree..I lived there (off Highland Ave(SanBerdo)) for 36 years and the only ones I've noticed having a slow speech are ones with a speech impediment.

"jmlowman" must be talking about a new generation of beachbums..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-28-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Bloomfield Twp, MI
57 posts, read 63,568 times
Reputation: 43
It wasn't until my adult years, late twenties perhaps that I began to notice my own Michigan accent. Indeed the accent is quite noticeable and distinct to people from different regions of the USA and even abroad. What caused me to take notice of my own accent was when I began to travel more frequently. My trips were to many states all over the USA, and also to the Caribbean, West Indies, Alaska, Hawaii, Canada, and most recently to Europe (France, Germany, Hungary, Serbia, Austria and Switzerland). When you interact with people from different parts of the world they make you aware of your accent, and are happy to cite specific examples. Also, my wife, who is from Western Canada, also helps me to recognize my accent, since she speaks with an accent from her home city of Calgary. We also have many friends from France - expats who are most fascinated with accents too.

So considering the above, it would fair to assume that those people from Michigan who maintain that they do not have a noticeable accent, simply don't take notice of it. Probably having no interest or desire to study their own speech and compare it to other people from different places. Therein, they are convinced that their Michigan accent is 'normalized', 'generic' or 'plain' english. But what about all the people they watch (and listen to) on television or radio? I suggest that when a person is watching TV or listening to the radio, it would be a rare occurrence that their brain is engaged to the speech patterns, pace, intonation, inflection of the actors, news anchors, interviewees, politicians and all the other varieties of individuals whom we take in from different forms of multimedia. So they do not take notice.

Talking about radio, I think a fantastic way to recognize one's own accent and speech anomalies in general, is to listen to NPR (National Public Radio). If you listen to the announcers, anchors, researchers, and even those that they interview, you quickly can notice the many differences in a Michigan accent. This is because all of the employees of NPR are from very diverse backgrounds, nationalities, and are all (usually) highly educated. The guests and interviewees are also diverse. It is also little known (maybe?), that all of the spoken words on NPR are edited in advance to ensure flowing, well-structured speech. That is, they remove all of the 'ahhs', 'ums', stutters, pauses and sometimes even combine paragraphs to create more continuity in speech and the content. So if one uses NPR for a 'reference', it's perfect for studying one's own accent.

The Michigan accent, to me, is one of fuzziness. I'd describe the sound as rolled with heavily relaxed ennunciation, but with no 'twang'. Soft around the edges with minimal peaks. The tone is rather chummy sounding. Many words lose their hard consonants, most notably with the hard 'T'. Vowels are pronounced in the most easy way possible, sort of merging together. The pace of speech may seem fast, but this may be an illusion, because of the slurring of words together. I also notice intrusive consonants as well, like 'L', which gets inserted in words like 'both' - which becomes 'bowlth'; 'Chrysler' becomes 'Clyesler'. Another one is 'stole', which gets a 'D' on the end of it, so it comes out as 'stold'. 'Milk' is 'Melk', 'Sherbet' is 'Sherbert', 'Doll' is 'Dull' and 'Twitter' becomes 'Twidder'. Select proper nouns suddenly are possessive, like 'Krogers', 'Fords', 'Meijers', 'Nordtroms' and 'K-Marts'. Other proper nouns elude this for some unknown reason. The pin/pen merger, along with the windy/wendy, and min/men are quite common. Also the weak vowel merger, as in ribbon/cabin is widespread as well. A weird one is the pronunciation of 'Lake Orion' (a city name), which is said as 'Lake Oreon', with the accent on the first syllable. Which should be pronounced as 'əˈrīən' or 'oh-RYE-in'. There are many more examples of incorrect pronunciations in Michigan, which I don't really consider to be the result of an accent
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2011, 04:26 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,484 times
Reputation: 10
Default awwwnt

OK, I get that the internet is full of pitfalls and opportunism, but I just want to know if black people say "awwnt" because of French influence in the South, or what.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: FL
1,716 posts, read 2,629,740 times
Reputation: 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyageur97 View Post
Southerners speak so ridiculously slowly that anyone working off the farm doesn't have all day to listen to them utter one simple sentence.
They do that on purpose so they don't confuse the deficient yankee gray matter. Next time your at a Southern yard sale and come across one of these,

http://ts3.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=1291195580646&id=f97476bceb502aa1 9d9c546f9aa556d9&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.toys-world.co.uk%2ftoys_catalogue%2fwooden%2f14%2fwoode n_shape_sorter_toy_cover.jpg (broken link)

don't waste our time indulging in a how-to conversation. Pay the 50 cents, take it home and practice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2011, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Michigan--good on the rocks
2,544 posts, read 3,595,063 times
Reputation: 1940
Not sure we yankees care what kind of educational tools are needed in southern universities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2011, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Lansing, MI
2,953 posts, read 6,148,376 times
Reputation: 3254
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
Not sure we yankees care what kind of educational tools are needed in southern universities.
Need to make a correction here just to clarify the confusion.

Michigan folk are not "Yankees," we are "Northerners." Just ask any real Yankee (Hailing from NY, NJ, etc) and they will be sure to tell you that you are not a Yankee because you do not talk like them or come from that area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,612 posts, read 63,082,800 times
Reputation: 30777
As I was told in south Carolina "If you ain't from the south, you are a Yankee"

In response to my saying why do you call me a Yankee, I live in Southern California.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2011, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,756,136 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
As I was told in south Carolina "If you ain't from the south, you are a Yankee"

In response to my saying why do you call me a Yankee, I live in Southern California.
It's where your originally from that counts. I lived in SoCal for 36 yr's and haven't lived in Mi, since 1969,
yet I'm still called a Yankee. (not that it bothers me)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2011, 09:11 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,194,892 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sgt. Buzzcut View Post
They do that on purpose so they don't confuse the deficient yankee gray matter. Next time your at a Southern yard sale and come across one of these,

don't waste our time indulging in a how-to conversation. Pay the 50 cents, take it home and practice.
Well you may think "Yankees" have deficient gray matter, but at least we know that not all Northerners are called Yankees. Just those from the Northeast (more specifically New England), and that "your" is totally wrong, it should be "you're." Keep telling yourself that we are the slow ones if it makes you feel better about yourself, and we'll continue laughing at the Southerners who don't even know who to use the name "Yankee" on. Not that we Northerners continue to use terms "Yankee or rebel" to indicate where a person is from, we stopped fighting the Civil War back in 1865.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2011, 11:41 PM
 
Location: FL
1,716 posts, read 2,629,740 times
Reputation: 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Well you may think "Yankees" have deficient gray matter, but at least we know that not all Northerners are called Yankees. Just those from the Northeast (more specifically New England), and that "your" is totally wrong, it should be "you're." Keep telling yourself that we are the slow ones if it makes you feel better about yourself, and we'll continue laughing at the Southerners who don't even know who to use the name "Yankee" on. Not that we Northerners continue to use terms "Yankee or rebel" to indicate where a person is from, we stopped fighting the Civil War back in 1865.
Ah..... a spell check cop. You gotta love it, especially when your first 2 sentences are a grammatical nightmare; a comma and the use of "just" as a conjunctive adverb would have been more appropriate. I guess if it passes for 12th grade English in MI, it's good enough for CD.

I have another lesson you may find helpful. The term "Yankee" was in use long before the Civil War.

Speaking of laughing, I about split a seam behind a Michigan-plated car at the ATM drive-thru yesterday. It took the fool about 10 minutes to make a simple withdrawal. I hollered at him to take his MARVIN card and insert it stripe to the right. He just shook his head in disgust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top