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Old 05-09-2010, 12:20 AM
 
Location: MN
3,736 posts, read 4,785,395 times
Reputation: 1618
Default Are there mountains in Michigan?!?

I'm from Minnesota.
I have been to Michigan about 10 times.
I have family in Benton Harbor, Lansing, East Lansing, Kalamazoo/BC area.
Also to the UP to Houghton, Marquette and Ironwood.


Are there mountains in Michigan? I have heard that there were. If so, can anybody post pictures?
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Old 05-09-2010, 05:26 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,146 posts, read 21,268,786 times
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Not like the soaring Rockies or that look like the White Mountains in the East. There are big hills that are called mountains, just like in MN. If you have been to the UP to those areas, you already know what we have that are called Mountains, why are you asking this question? Just to stir an argument or something?
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,499 posts, read 9,775,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Not like the soaring Rockies or that look like the White Mountains in the East. There are big hills that are called mountains, just like in MN. If you have been to the UP to those areas, you already know what we have that are called Mountains, why are you asking this question? Just to stir an argument or something?

Perhaps OP is looking to relocate(?) and loves to ski?

They don't call it Iron Mountain for nothing do they?
Attached Thumbnails
Are there mountains in Michigan?!?-autumn1.jpg   Are there mountains in Michigan?!?-vfumeefalls1.jpg  

Last edited by zthatzmanz28; 05-09-2010 at 09:16 AM..
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:24 AM
 
Location: MN
3,736 posts, read 4,785,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Not like the soaring Rockies or that look like the White Mountains in the East. There are big hills that are called mountains, just like in MN. If you have been to the UP to those areas, you already know what we have that are called Mountains, why are you asking this question? Just to stir an argument or something?

Yeah because driving from Duluth to Marquette shows soo many mountains.

I've heard of something called the porcupines? Is that by Marquette? Would I have been able to experience them on the drive to Marquette?
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Area, Michigan
1,097 posts, read 1,651,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I'm from Minnesota.
I have been to Michigan about 10 times.
I have family in Benton Harbor, Lansing, East Lansing, Kalamazoo/BC area.
Also to the UP to Houghton, Marquette and Ironwood.


Are there mountains in Michigan? I have heard that there were. If so, can anybody post pictures?
Category:Mountains of Michigan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Wherever I go...
397 posts, read 358,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Yeah because driving from Duluth to Marquette shows soo many mountains.

I've heard of something called the porcupines? Is that by Marquette? Would I have been able to experience them on the drive to Marquette?
They're called mountains... and technically, by what is taught in the US, they are:

Quote:
Flat to 500 feet, base to highest point - Rolling Plain
Highest point 501 to 999 feet above base - Hill
Highest point 1000 feet or more above base - Mountain
The Porkies reach a max height of 1,958 feet of elevation. Wiki has a few pictures and some descriptive info about them.

My husband goes up to them yearly to cross country ski, hike and camp, and he's rather proud of "Michigan's mountains."

Me, well, I used to live in Colorado Springs... so I'm a snob when it comes to mountains and love to tease him that the Porkies barely constitute foothills. LOL

I'm not sure if they are visible from route 28, which is likely the way you'd take to go from Duluth to Marquette... but I THINK you would be able to. If not, you could always drive just a little out of your way and head north on route 64. It'd be worth the short detour, I'd think.

There's also the Huron Mountains which include Mt Arvon, the highest elevation in Michigan (1,979 feet), but I think they're a little less accessible than the Porkies.
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Old 05-09-2010, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Marquette, MI
208 posts, read 347,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Yeah because driving from Duluth to Marquette shows soo many mountains.

I've heard of something called the porcupines? Is that by Marquette? Would I have been able to experience them on the drive to Marquette?
The Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park (a.k.a. the Porkies) are located near the western end of the U.P., about 15 miles west of Ontonagon. Beautiful place, especially if you can catch it during the peak of fall colors. Excellent hiking and waterfalls.

If you're coming from Duluth towards Marquette, take Thomaston Rd/County Rd. 519 north (turnoff is just past Wakefield). You can follow that to Presque Isle Park at the end and there's easy access to a few of the bigger waterfalls there. Taking a right turn on South Boundary Road before Presque Isle Park will lead you to the other side of the park and there's a lot of hiking access points along the way. Lake of the Clouds overlook is the most popular tourist spot, though it'll cost you a few bucks if you want to drive up.
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Old 05-09-2010, 11:38 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
7,938 posts, read 7,868,597 times
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I live in the Huron Mountains. Marquette is included in this very old worn down range. They are the oldest mountains in the world and once were higher than the himalayas.
Whats important as far as an area like this being dramatic is the rise in elevation and the view, not the overall height from sea level. My home is at 1300 feet on a mountain top, I have an unobstructed 50 mile view of Lake Superior, and am only 4 miles from Marquette. They are mountains to me for sure, considering the bulk of the U.P. is low swampy land.
Many people consider the Rockies as dramatic, and they are, yet most cities and towns are in the valleys, not a lot higher than many other areas in this Country where there is considerable variations in elevation. The Blue Ridge Mountains are a good example. I had a home at 4,000 feet in NC,on the side of a mtn. yet , the view here in the U.P. is just as dramatic, maybe more so...with Superior in view.
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Old 05-09-2010, 04:39 PM
 
258 posts, read 552,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darstar View Post
I live in the Huron Mountains. Marquette is included in this very old worn down range. They are the oldest mountains in the world and once were higher than the himalayas.
Whats important as far as an area like this being dramatic is the rise in elevation and the view, not the overall height from sea level. My home is at 1300 feet on a mountain top, I have an unobstructed 50 mile view of Lake Superior, and am only 4 miles from Marquette. They are mountains to me for sure, considering the bulk of the U.P. is low swampy land.
Many people consider the Rockies as dramatic, and they are, yet most cities and towns are in the valleys, not a lot higher than many other areas in this Country where there is considerable variations in elevation. The Blue Ridge Mountains are a good example. I had a home at 4,000 feet in NC,on the side of a mtn. yet , the view here in the U.P. is just as dramatic, maybe more so...with Superior in view.
Well, not really ...regarding the towns in the valleys being about the same elevation as most cities and towns. I lived in Wyoming for 12 years and am, also, a bit of a snob regarding mountains. I'd have to say I don't consider any of the hills in Michigan, including the Porcupines, as mountains. The valley floor in Jackson Hole is at 6300 feet. In Cody I lived at 5000 feet. In Casper/Douglas you'll be around 4500 or so. Heading north to Billings, MT, you'll descend to about 3500. Denver's at 5000. The elevations in the Rocky Mtn West is just higher all around than the 'flatlands' in other areas. And if you're a climber or even just a hiker who likes to scramble up mountain paths, you can quickly find yourself between 7500 and 13000 ft. Matters not whether you're on the valley floor or on the side of the mountains. Michigan has its own beauty with the wonderful lakes, rocky outcroppings at Pictured Rocks, etc., etc. But I sure wouldn't call any of it "mountainous"!!
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Old 05-09-2010, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Wherever I go...
397 posts, read 358,855 times
Reputation: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by dori36 View Post
But I sure wouldn't call any of it "mountainous"!!
Shhhhh... one thing I learned when I moved here 11 years ago... flat landers get VERY defensive about their speed bumps!

I'm teasing... *chuckling* I love Michigan and am going to miss it when we move to Iowa next month.

People seem to think Michigan is all, or even mostly, industrial. Even I had no idea how amazingly beautiful it is here until I'd lived here a few years and had plenty of time to spend weekends traveling around the state. Our tours around the UP or weekends at Leelanau are some of my favorite vacation memories... and I'm going to miss it here a great deal.

I'm glad our family is still here... my father-in-law likes doing family weekend getaways in-state, and I'd imagine we'll still make arrangements to join as many of those as we can.

But I'm still going to miss it... Michigan is "home" for me now, and that's hard to give up.
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