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Old 01-14-2017, 07:46 PM
 
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what if you catch up on your bills and pay off the things you have in collections to join ?? then can you get in ??
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Old 01-15-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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That depends on the squadron commander. Ours will let you join without a waiver if the collections accounts are less than 4 total accounts and are all paid off. Anything not paid off= waiver. 5 or more accounts ever delinquent=waiver.
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:06 PM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
16,756 posts, read 7,467,199 times
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DMarie,


You probably received this as well, some updated standards for tattoos and accession waivers. A lot of it you already disclose. Some good-to-know that seems to be quite popular on this forum, including a graphic for tattoos.



10 Jan 2017 SecAF/PA

While medical accession standards are standardized across the Services, the Air Force has modified some of its more restrictive service policy, or established specific criteria to streamline and standardize waiver processes to increase the number of qualified candidates entering service. These changes include:

• Eczema: Select candidates medically classified as having mild forms of eczema will be processed for a waiver. Certain occupational restrictions may be applied to secure personal and mission safety.

• ADHD: Candidates who do not meet the standard of never having taken more than a single daily dosage of medication or not having been prescribed medication for their condition for more than 24 cumulative months after the age of 14 will be processed for a waiver if they have demonstrated at least 15 months of performance stability (academic or vocational) off medication immediately preceding enlistment or enrollment and they continue to meet remaining criteria as outlined in Defense Department Instruction 6130.03.

• Asthma: The Air Force will use the Methacholine Challenge Test to provide an objective measure of candidates with an ambiguous or uncertain history of asthma. Candidates who successfully pass this test will be processed for a waiver.

• Pre-accession marijuana usage: The revised policy will remove the service prescribed numerical limitations on prior use of marijuana when determining accession qualifications. In accordance with DOD standards, a medical diagnosis of substance-related disorders or addiction remains medically disqualifying for service. Additionally, any legal proceedings associated with pre-service use will continue to be reviewed and adjudicated separately and may be disqualifying depending on the nature of the offense(s). The Air Force will maintain a strict “no use” policy. An applicant or enlistee will be disqualified for service if they use drugs after the initial entrance interview.


The whole article is at the public website, and is not as detailed as the Air Force Portal page.

AF evolves policies to access more talent, maintain high standards > U.S. Air Force > Article Display
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Old 01-15-2017, 03:06 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,369 posts, read 9,894,084 times
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Yes, I'm very happy to see these changes!
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:26 PM
 
Location: At mah house
615 posts, read 317,131 times
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This is a very informative thread. My son has already said he wants to join the Air Force when he gets older, so it's good information like this is readily available.

I'm curious about something, though. Why does the USAF, and really any other branch, worry about specific height/weight requirements when they have specific fitness requirements? It would seem to me if someone is a few lbs. heavier than they would prefer but can still meet the fitness requirements (x amt of miles, x push-ups, x sit-ups, etc), their specific height/weight shouldn't matter.

I'm also curious about the credit requirements. In general I get why they would want someone who has shown financial responsibility over someone who hasn't, but I wonder how deliberative the process is. Life can be complicated and doesn't necessarily paint a full picture on your credit report. If someone loses their job, they're probably going to be late on a few bills. If someone just happens to miss a payment, it may get reported by their creditor. It's especially difficult for college students who rack up thousands of dollars in student loan debt and then can't find a job after graduation. It just seems like maybe that requirement made more sense back when everything wasn't centered around credit, and the stability of a military paycheck can be accounted for whereas civilian jobs can be somewhat dicey depending on any number of factors.
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Old 01-16-2017, 08:52 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,369 posts, read 9,894,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdmil View Post
This is a very informative thread. My son has already said he wants to join the Air Force when he gets older, so it's good information like this is readily available.

I'm curious about something, though. Why does the USAF, and really any other branch, worry about specific height/weight requirements when they have specific fitness requirements? It would seem to me if someone is a few lbs. heavier than they would prefer but can still meet the fitness requirements (x amt of miles, x push-ups, x sit-ups, etc), their specific height/weight shouldn't matter.

I'm also curious about the credit requirements. In general I get why they would want someone who has shown financial responsibility over someone who hasn't, but I wonder how deliberative the process is. Life can be complicated and doesn't necessarily paint a full picture on your credit report. If someone loses their job, they're probably going to be late on a few bills. If someone just happens to miss a payment, it may get reported by their creditor. It's especially difficult for college students who rack up thousands of dollars in student loan debt and then can't find a job after graduation. It just seems like maybe that requirement made more sense back when everything wasn't centered around credit, and the stability of a military paycheck can be accounted for whereas civilian jobs can be somewhat dicey depending on any number of factors.
Weight: It's complicated. We aren't approved to administer the fitness test to applicants, so we use the Ht/Wt as a stop-gap. The Air Force works off of waist measurement, but we don't want male recruiters asking female applicants to life their shirts in order to measure their wastes. This is a big can of worms. We use the ht/wt because it's the next best thing. We have to have something to use so we're not putting in obese people, and standing on a scale is less invasive than recruiters touching applicants' stomachs to measure them.

Credit: Because we want people in the Air Force to have credibility with society. Those who won't pay their just debts lose credibility. Right now, if you're Air Force, you can more easily get a mortgage, car loan, credit card, line of credit, etc, because creditors know you will pay it due to being in the Air Force and being forced to pay it. If people start going delinquent, we'll lose that for the rest of us. It's also a security clearance issue. The Air Force doesn't run security clearances. We don't issue our own. OPM does security clearances, and they will refuse to issue high level clearances to people with financial issues because those people are theoretically easier to blackmail. If you've got $60K in student loans, and they've been delinquent, and you're stressed over them, and someone offers you $60K to smuggle out a classified file, you're way more tempted than if you have no stress over debt. Make sense?

We also want/need responsible adults in the military. Adults should not take on more debt than they can handle. I've done many many many financial waivers. More often than not, a person is getting fired from jobs (not a good sign), or has decided not to pay their bills (not a good sign). Being unable to adhere to employer expectations and being unable to hold a job can also be an issue with OPM and can make it harder to get a clearance. We don't want people who can't adhere to standards and rules and follow authority, or who can't come to work on time, or who have interpersonal issues with coworkers, or the million other reasons people often lose jobs. You have to commit to us for 4 years, but you've never been able to hold a job? Not a good sign.
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Old 01-17-2017, 07:36 PM
 
Location: At mah house
615 posts, read 317,131 times
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Thanks for your response.

The weight restrictions make sense. The credit part makes sense too for the most part, but I think the USAF might need to rethink its position as far as student loan debt is concerned. I'd rather my son learn a trade or go into the military than go to a university unless he knows what he wants to do and/or he's academically motivated. Reason being, so many young people go into tens of thousands of dollars in debt before they're even old enough to drink because they feel like they have to go to college.

The government has made accessibility for college into a crutch of sorts. They basically write a blank check to kids so they can go to college, which gives universities no incentive to make tuition/expenses affordable, so kids wind up buying a brand-new Camry every year they're in school. And once they have that debt, they can't do anything but pay it, since student loan debt can't be written off in bankruptcy and most loan forgiveness programs take awhile to kick in, if you even qualify. It would seem to me being delinquent on student loan debt is less representative of lifestyle/work ethic than if you have a few maxed out credit cards.

I'm not trying to argue anything -- I know you don't make the rules -- but that does seem like one area where they should re-think the requirements a bit and allow for present-day economic struggles.
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Old 01-17-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,369 posts, read 9,894,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdmil View Post
Thanks for your response.

The weight restrictions make sense. The credit part makes sense too for the most part, but I think the USAF might need to rethink its position as far as student loan debt is concerned. I'd rather my son learn a trade or go into the military than go to a university unless he knows what he wants to do and/or he's academically motivated. Reason being, so many young people go into tens of thousands of dollars in debt before they're even old enough to drink because they feel like they have to go to college.

The government has made accessibility for college into a crutch of sorts. They basically write a blank check to kids so they can go to college, which gives universities no incentive to make tuition/expenses affordable, so kids wind up buying a brand-new Camry every year they're in school. And once they have that debt, they can't do anything but pay it, since student loan debt can't be written off in bankruptcy and most loan forgiveness programs take awhile to kick in, if you even qualify. It would seem to me being delinquent on student loan debt is less representative of lifestyle/work ethic than if you have a few maxed out credit cards.

I'm not trying to argue anything -- I know you don't make the rules -- but that does seem like one area where they should re-think the requirements a bit and allow for present-day economic struggles.
I've been a recruiter for 8 years. I've never turned a single person away for student loan debt. Never. Not one. I put a lady in who had over $300K in debt (put her in as a doctor, but still). We're not turning away many people for student loan debt. We are turning them away for delinquencies though.

I've done waivers for people with previously delinquent student loans, but all the waivers have been approved. None have been denied.

I've done waivers for people with excessive student loan debt, but all the waivers have been approved. None have been denied.

I'd done waivers for people delinquent who have set up payment plans as low as $25 a month. The payment plan allows them to get a waiver... and guess what... they're all approved. None have been denied.

We're simply not turning people away from student loan debt. There may be additional hassle, or additional steps, or additional vetting, but they're not being turned away.
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Old 01-17-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: At mah house
615 posts, read 317,131 times
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Well that's good. Maybe it's more of a discretionary thing. They'll keep the requirement in place, but they won't necessarily turn you away if that's the only, or primary, credit issue.
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Old 01-19-2017, 02:25 AM
 
Location: In a state of mind
6,000 posts, read 6,850,765 times
Reputation: 11300
Interesting thread about AF standards. When I was in the Army I think they took anyone who wasn't on death row. Maybe that's the difference between being dumb enough to jump OUT of airplanes, and smart enough to fly them...
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