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Old 03-29-2011, 12:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTLightning View Post
I answered below based on my tours on a conventional carrier (USS America) nuke carrier (USS Eisenhower) very old sub tender (USS Hunley) and an amphib assault (USS Tortuga)










Thanks, I am not that fond of daylight.
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Old 03-29-2011, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Fuquay Varina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Java378 View Post
Thanks, I am not that fond of daylight.
Then it really depends on your rating (job) that you choose. Some are outside day or night rain or shine! Engineering ratings usually are the ones stuck inside most of the time! I could have gone 2 weeks without seeing daylight if I didn't go outside on my own lol


many times on a cruise I would get up early before flight ops or anyone was busy up there, I would go to the very front of the carrier flight deck and sit there looking forward watching the sun come up on the ocean. Moments like that can't be forgotten nor replaced. I would for a few minutes forget I was in the navy, forget how far away from home I was and just enjoy the beauty of it. Sounds corny i guess but those moments were some of my favorite times on ship.
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Old 03-29-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
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If you're one of those gusy who works on the flight deck you will be outside all the time!
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Old 03-29-2011, 03:19 PM
 
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I can stand the sun, I'm not a vampire. I just don't care if I see it. If I have to deal with steel passageways all the time, I'm just fine.

I only have a problem with two sources of light at one time. It feels draining sometimes. So when I'm in my home, I turn off all the lights til 6:00PM.
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Old 03-29-2011, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
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I was a pitsnipe MM2. Worked in the engine room of steam driven ships. At sea we could put in 18 hour workdays and be lucky to get 4 to 5 hours sleep. The average engine room temp was about 95 in front of the vent. Some areas away from the vent could get between 115 to 120. Some jobs worked a more normal schedule.
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Old 03-29-2011, 05:05 PM
 
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Aside from considering what rate you will choose upon joining the Navy, also consider how employable that rate will make you upon re-integrating back into civilian world.

Like others here, I was in the engineering division. We worked with boilers, pumps, and a vast array of machinery. Soon after my 4 year enlistment (and with a little civilian technical schooling and licensing) I easily walked into the power generation field. This has been my vocation for 26 consecutive years. Haven't been without work or gone without a paycheck in that amount of time. The demand for power plant workers has normally been high for as long as I've been in the field. Currently, 75% of the guys I work with are ex-Navy propulsion engineering Sailors.

Early last year I met an active duty Sailor stationed on a nuke aircraft carrier. He was a load dispatcher. A few months before his enlistment was up, he contacted a few of my acquaintances in the field. Long story short. . .upon getting out he started as an entry level load dispatcher. His starting salary? $87,000/year.

Food for thought!
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Old 03-29-2011, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
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That's true. I work in a hospital boiler room. Been here 11 1/2 years now.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:06 PM
 
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Working for a power generation company now, most ex non nuclear snipes start at between $ 22 to 25 an hour. After they earn their quals. with over time they are around $100k. Also depending on your job also means more or less money. Some guys are happy with working in a control room where they don't get dirty, can watch tv, listen to the radio etc, however most work swing shifts. Other guys want to actually work on something and don't want to work swings so they opt for something else.

I do telecomm work and work 8 to 4:30. I however get called out at all hours.

As for sun light I spent usually 2 hours of my day when I was in the Navy in a concrete vault with a bank door on it. So it all depends on your job.
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Old 03-29-2011, 11:32 PM
 
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I concur with the last three posters,engineering is a virtual lock on a good high five,low six figure salary.I was an MM2,have been out for 25 plus years,and have never wanted for work.However,most propulsion today is either nuke (subs and flattops),or gas turbines (cruisers and destroyers).Very little boiler work left,most auxiliaries and amphibs are diesels.This is a minor disadvantage as most civilian power plants operate with some form of boilers,either as their main generation,or as a HRSG (heat recovery steam generator).So some civilian tech training in chemistry would be helpful.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:58 AM
 
2,563 posts, read 3,083,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitroae23 View Post
I concur with the last three posters,engineering is a virtual lock on a good high five,low six figure salary.I was an MM2,have been out for 25 plus years,and have never wanted for work.However,most propulsion today is either nuke (subs and flattops),or gas turbines (cruisers and destroyers).Very little boiler work left,most auxiliaries and amphibs are diesels.This is a minor disadvantage as most civilian power plants operate with some form of boilers,either as their main generation,or as a HRSG (heat recovery steam generator).So some civilian tech training in chemistry would be helpful.
I concur. Most power plants still rely on the typical boiler/steam-turbine simple cycle arrangement. Newer installations seem to be going in the combined cycle direction. Regardless, as others here have agreed, the OP would benefit from taking future employability into account when selecting a rate.

Mind you, some rates DO NOT transfer well into civilian employment. For example, my brother was an Aviation Ordnanceman (AO). He serviced ammunition handling equipment, and was stationed at a Navy airbase. What did he do with his AO training after the Navy? Absolutely NOTHING!
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