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Old 03-30-2011, 07:39 AM
 
3,242 posts, read 4,763,919 times
Reputation: 1323

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
I concur. Most power plants still rely on the typical boiler/steam-turbine simple cycle arrangement. Newer installations seem to be going in the combined cycle direction. Regardless, as others here have agreed, the OP would benefit from taking future employability into account when selecting a rate.

Mind you, some rates DO NOT transfer well into civilian employment. For example, my brother was an Aviation Ordnanceman (AO). He serviced ammunition handling equipment, and was stationed at a Navy airbase. What did he do with his AO training after the Navy? Absolutely NOTHING!

Almost all new plants being built are Combined Cycle mainly because of three things.

1.) Efficiency is improved to +50% vs. 28 to 33% on old CT natural gas and coal plants.
2.) Price of natural gas futures are very cheap making it 20% less expensive to burn gas to make steam vs. coal right now.
3.) Maintenance and overall staff required for the plants is much lower vs. a traditional coal plant.

A 1.2 GW CC facility only needs about 30 technicians and engineers needed. All outage work is contracted out to the manufacturer on a contract. Compare to coal where a small coal plant may have 100 to 150 people for 300 MW's.

Also if it was me I would stay away from Aviation at all costs as the job prospects are very limited due to Airlines downsizing and the overall amount of people in the field.

The CT and IT fields are excellent because of the clearances and what they prepare you for when you exit, and the engineering rates because of training.
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Old 03-31-2011, 06:27 PM
 
630 posts, read 1,630,860 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellhead View Post
Almost all new plants being built are Combined Cycle mainly because of three things.

1.) Efficiency is improved to +50% vs. 28 to 33% on old CT natural gas and coal plants.
2.) Price of natural gas futures are very cheap making it 20% less expensive to burn gas to make steam vs. coal right now.
3.) Maintenance and overall staff required for the plants is much lower vs. a traditional coal plant.

A 1.2 GW CC facility only needs about 30 technicians and engineers needed. All outage work is contracted out to the manufacturer on a contract. Compare to coal where a small coal plant may have 100 to 150 people for 300 MW's.

Also if it was me I would stay away from Aviation at all costs as the job prospects are very limited due to Airlines downsizing and the overall amount of people in the field.

The CT and IT fields are excellent because of the clearances and what they prepare you for when you exit, and the engineering rates because of training.
Bellheads staffing numbers translates likewise to the USN,engineering needs alot less staffing on Gas Turbine powered ships,therefore,alot less people coming on to the job market. P.S. Most employers in the power industry look at Navy experience as the gold standard.
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Old 04-01-2011, 09:18 AM
 
2,558 posts, read 3,080,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitroae23 View Post
Bellheads staffing numbers translates likewise to the USN,engineering needs alot less staffing on Gas Turbine powered ships,therefore,alot less people coming on to the job market. P.S. Most employers in the power industry look at Navy experience as the gold standard.
Hopefully the OP (Java 378) is taking note of our response posts. Given that he's not much into "sunlight" getting into propulsion engineering should appeal to him.

Two questions remain to be answered:

1. Is Java 378 interested in propulsion engineering?

2. If so, what must he do to get into the field as a GS, MM, or EM?

I wish him the best.

It's been almost 28 years since I got out after a brief 4 year hitch as a BT. I was interested in "re-upping" for another 4, but was unable to secure what I wanted. However, upon getting out I immediately looked for ways to get into power generation. Took several related courses at a local tech college, and obtained the necessary licensing. Less than 2 years after getting out of the Navy I was hired at a power plant as an Operator Assistant. My salary darn near doubled over night.

Despite its few inherent hardships, I've truly enjoyed this vocation. I regularly recommend it to young men unsure of what line of work to get in to. Sadly, as soon as the hardships are mentioned, the conversation usually comes to an end. It's comical to watch young faces contort when informing them that the job often entails rotating shifts, working weekends & holidays, or the rare 16 hour shift.
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Old 04-01-2011, 10:42 AM
 
3,774 posts, read 9,891,313 times
Reputation: 1824
I was an ET, and currently work for an energy systems division in my company.
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Old 04-01-2011, 12:43 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 3,018,763 times
Reputation: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Hopefully the OP (Java 378) is taking note of our response posts. Given that he's not much into "sunlight" getting into propulsion engineering should appeal to him.

Two questions remain to be answered:

1. Is Java 378 interested in propulsion engineering?

2. If so, what must he do to get into the field as a GS, MM, or EM?

I wish him the best.

It's been almost 28 years since I got out after a brief 4 year hitch as a BT. I was interested in "re-upping" for another 4, but was unable to secure what I wanted. However, upon getting out I immediately looked for ways to get into power generation. Took several related courses at a local tech college, and obtained the necessary licensing. Less than 2 years after getting out of the Navy I was hired at a power plant as an Operator Assistant. My salary darn near doubled over night.

Despite its few inherent hardships, I've truly enjoyed this vocation. I regularly recommend it to young men unsure of what line of work to get in to. Sadly, as soon as the hardships are mentioned, the conversation usually comes to an end. It's comical to watch young faces contort when informing them that the job often entails rotating shifts, working weekends & holidays, or the rare 16 hour shift.

1. Yes, I am interested.

2. I do not know.
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Old 04-01-2011, 03:15 PM
 
3,242 posts, read 4,763,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JavaPhil View Post
I was an ET, and currently work for an energy systems division in my company.

Nuke or conventional?

If conventional

Comm or radar?
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Old 04-01-2011, 03:45 PM
 
7,047 posts, read 15,970,258 times
Reputation: 4396
Even though I spent most of my Active Duty/4 yrs onboard a Destroyer in a Destroyer Escort Group out of San Diego from '68 to '72, too many rates have changed in the Navy to give a good opinion. For example, there use to be a rate of SK (Storekeeper), but now the Storekeeper and Postal rates have become one as a Logistics Specialist! Anyway, if your onboard a Destroyer and you are docked, doing Sea Trials or on a Cruise, the rate that see's a lot of outside weather is a Boatswain's Mate! Another thing, from what I understand "shipboard life" has changed some-to-quite a bit since I was in. No "civi's" (civilian clothes) were allowed onboard when I first went in and later that changed. Heck, I don't even know if the old "dungerees" type work clothes are worn anymore!

Last edited by LoveBoating; 04-01-2011 at 03:53 PM..
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Old 04-01-2011, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 22,949,319 times
Reputation: 7957
Nope, they don't even wear boondockers. Saw an official Navy YouTube video on bootcamp and the recruits were standing on a Dr Sholls type machine to tell them which type of insole they need.
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Old 04-02-2011, 09:57 AM
 
3,242 posts, read 4,763,919 times
Reputation: 1323
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
Nope, they don't even wear boondockers. Saw an official Navy YouTube video on bootcamp and the recruits were standing on a Dr Sholls type machine to tell them which type of insole they need.

Rift.....

Man what have we come to???

No more dungerees, no more boondockers, soon no more tacking on the crow...

Bunch of softies..
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Old 04-03-2011, 02:54 PM
 
4,159 posts, read 4,188,178 times
Reputation: 2196
Pick your rate, pick your fate. Be very careful on which rate you pick because you won't have much of a chance to change late. Anything in the engineering dept. will be long hours. The electronic techs/IT's have it a bit better, but if it breaks, you will be working late to get it back on line.

One thing to remember, you will be working, living with people that you would most likely not want to associate with if you had a choice. About 10 percent of any organization is "dead weight". The services have got very good at eliminating the drug users, but still, they sometimes get by. Theft, of course that goes on. My one disappointment during my time was the constant negative attitude displayed so often. All in all, it was a good career for me, very difficult at times, but looking back, I enjoyed it.
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