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Old 09-30-2013, 09:42 AM
 
12,703 posts, read 12,108,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
'Combat' [or hazardous duty] means different things in different communities.

A P-3 Orion sub-hunting squadron goes into combat in an entirely different manner from how a marine platoon does it.

I received combat-pay for about 18 years of my career. Combat-pay takes on different names in different communities, in the Silent Service it is called sub-pay.
Sub-pay is not anything remotely close to combat pay.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Most subs have a couple running machines. Though I never witnessed them operating after the first month underwater. They seem to be very high maintenance items.
Luckily, ours were always working.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I have tried jogging laps around Upper Level Missile Compartment, and it can be done. But there are a lot of pipes hanging at head level, steel boxes sticking out, and sharp lock-wire sticking out [from folks doing nuc-weaps maintenance]. So if you try jogging on the track you end up with a lot of cuts, bruises and concussions.
I have never witnessed this, though they seem to always show this on any show about the Ohio class. I could not imagine even trying, especially me being at 6'4". As use to count laps as roving patrol to see how far a watch I would walk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
On every sub I served on, we had a few body-builders. It was never encouraged, though it was never actually forbidden either. Body-building brings along with it a host of it's own unique ailments. Along with the problems inherent in bulking-up, there are the pulled muscles, sprains, liver damage, etc.
Never heard of such stuff, like never. Body building has the same injury risk as any other workout. Where you get the liver damage from? Heck, anyone doing any activity has a risk for a sprain, pulled muscle, etc. I will state further that I never knew of any body builder or power lifter that had an injury, compare this with the more than few individuals who always seem to have issues when PT testing came up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
In the service your body is the government's. To knowingly do damage to your body is illegal. To knowingly do activities that put your body at higher risk for becoming disabled can be seen in a poor light.
Your body does not "belong" to the government. You are under contract to perform certain duties, and any attempts to get out of that contract either on purpose or by negligence will be punished. I have never witnessed or heard of article 115 being used in a NJP; so my guess is it is not very common at all.
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:45 AM
 
12,703 posts, read 12,108,167 times
Reputation: 17396
Oh yes, to answer the question; sea duty sucks, it is THE main reason I got out after 12 years. One sea rotation is enough for me.

I reaaly feel sorry (well, not at all actually) for the guys who do all they can to stay at sea due to needing the money (sea pay and sub-pay) to keep their finances from unwinding. Those types will just end up keeping their sub-pay during shore duty in exchange for promising to go back to sea.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
9,681 posts, read 5,674,281 times
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i loved sea duty. from my first tour aboard a carrier forward deployed to japan, to an LHA (helo carrier), destroyers, cruisers, frigates, a cable laying ship, and an msc oiler. not being in a sea intensive rate, i always volunteered to take sea tours - back to back to back.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:07 AM
 
8,869 posts, read 7,356,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
If you are on a submarine or ship, how do you stay fit for combat? Do they let you go swimming every now and then? Is there a weight room or gymnasium for you to play in?
Depends on the ship. I served on a large amphib (a helicopter carrier) and we had a fully stocked weight room that included stationary bikes, rowing machines, wrestling mats, and other equipment. The flight deck was large enough for jogging. The ladders (very steep stairs) alone are an exercise. We regularly ran up and down these ladders. Working in the engine room, we found ways to exercise depending on the make up of the space. Between our flash type evaporators (evaps for short) I could do lunges, squats, push-ups, and jumping jacks. We had a large pipe that was chair height and in front of it was a small copper pipe a few inches off the floor. Hook feet on the small copper pipe and do sit ups while sitting on the large pipe leaning back until the back is horizontal to the floor before coming up. The engine was about 2 stories tall and surrounded by catwalks. We could do pull-ups by hanging on the handrails of the catwalks. Manhandling working parties were a workout. People formed lines and tossed supplies from one person to another until all the supplies were loaded. Some smaller ships had a universal weight machine and a stationary bike.
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,539,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Oh yes, to answer the question; sea duty sucks, it is THE main reason I got out after 12 years. One sea rotation is enough for me.

I reaaly feel sorry (well, not at all actually) for the guys who do all they can to stay at sea due to needing the money (sea pay and sub-pay) to keep their finances from unwinding. Those types will just end up keeping their sub-pay during shore duty in exchange for promising to go back to sea.
The money was addicting.

I got:
BAQ,
BAS,
COLA / VHA,
Sub pay,
Career sub pay,
Sea pay,
Career sea pay,
Sea pay kicker,
Female separation pay,
All in addition to base pay.

Base-pay normally runs 1/3 of your paycheck. At least for the crew, officers not so much.

My SRB level was $65k every four-years during my career. It went up to $90k the year I retired. When I started, we got lump-sum. Then it was changed to only give you 50% of your SRB up-front and annual installments for the next four years. They were talking about dropping the big payment entirely. So every time you re-up you only got 25% of it, and annual installments of 25% each.

The tax-exempt status kept us from paying income taxes, which is effectively a 24% pay-raise by itself.
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Old 10-05-2013, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
9,871 posts, read 8,021,943 times
Reputation: 11232
Interesting responses. I loved to operate. Not always glamorous, but better than being stuck at a pier connected to the paperwork providers. We were once on line for 100 days, or so, due to an emergency situation in Korea and the fact that our replacement ship was not qualified to relieve us....and that got a little dreary after a while, but not any worse than a Minnesota winter!
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
9,681 posts, read 5,674,281 times
Reputation: 17459
i worked it so i almost never had to use ship's laundry; lots of pairs of t-shirts, underwear, etc. wash my stuff in the sink, dry, iron. no more busted buttons from the steam press. i washed my own pt gear, hung them to dry in the head. most ports were laundry stops for me. either diy, or pier side service. asian ports; hong kong, japan, etc. were the best. drop off your bundle. pick it up, pay, and it's all clean, folded, packaged. reasonable prices too.
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