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Old 07-08-2011, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Glen Mills
699 posts, read 831,697 times
Reputation: 423

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I’ve been here about 6 weeks. There’s never a completely normal day. A threat or a threat of a threat always exists. Later today a couple of platoons will be conducting a patrol of some of the streets nearby. We’ve done it before but each day makes you a little more weary. You can never let your guard down. You have to be cautious every move and step. I just got done writing a letter to Cindy and my two kids Ross and Cheryl. I think of them many times a day and anticipate I leave this country and return home. Cindy and the kids bought me a little prayer book; and, in it, a picture of her and the kids. It’s special to me and keeps me going every day. It’s about time now the platoon leaders have determined our route and are briefing us. We will be keeping a distance of about 20 feet apart, staggered. We must not stir up the locals by being careless and shoot without cause. The patrol leaders have told us not to take anything for granted. Our mission is to insure that the locals know of our presence and give them a sense of security. Funny!!! We are to give them a sense of security. The street is about 18 foot wide. We are staggered and in full gear. We’ve travelled about 1 mile and a half. It’s about 4:00 PM local time. There’s a young man approaching our front. He’s pretty far away so we can’t determine much. He’s walking up towards us not running not threatening at this point. I visualize him approaching and an explosion whipping through our patrol – wounded lying scattered about and human parts about us. I try to erase the tape but it plays over and over. He’s about 100 foot ahead of us now and still approaching – no fear. This scares me – about 50 foot now – 25 foot – he’s even with us and passes us. No threat today but you can never know. I must always be vigilant – for Cindy – for the kids.

Last edited by Norm Barnes; 07-08-2011 at 02:31 AM.. Reason: Proposed Fiction

 
Old 07-08-2011, 05:39 AM
 
1,308 posts, read 2,918,063 times
Reputation: 613
Do what you have to do to make back safe and sound and keep your chin up and mark off the day as it pass intill you get on the Freedom Bird headed toward home ..
 
Old 07-08-2011, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Glen Mills
699 posts, read 831,697 times
Reputation: 423
Please!!! This my perception -- not an actual hero in service. My time was spent during the Vietnam age.
 
Old 07-08-2011, 09:52 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,162 posts, read 38,978,487 times
Reputation: 28158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norm Barnes View Post
Please!!! This my perception -- not an actual hero in service. My time was spent during the Vietnam age.
What is the purpose of this post?


Rich
 
Old 07-08-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,693 posts, read 22,497,069 times
Reputation: 14290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
What is the purpose of this post?


Rich
I was wondering that myself. Seems like someone just trying to write what it feels like for someone in that situation.
 
Old 07-09-2011, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Glen Mills
699 posts, read 831,697 times
Reputation: 423
When on the internet I came across a photo of troops on patrol on a street in the middle east and in the photo it shows a kid strolling right up between them and passing through. Knowing the ability to conceal explosives has been brought to new levels by terrorists -- I was wondering what was going through the minds of the troops. You have to stand down or create a reportable incident and yet you know there's a risk with every passing civilian even a young person.
 
Old 07-16-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Glen Mills
699 posts, read 831,697 times
Reputation: 423
Default Remember SSG Barry Sadler?

Barry Sadler (November 1, 1940 – November 5, 1989) was an American soldier, author and musician. Following his airborne training, Sadler volunteered for the US Army's elite Special Forces and passed the difficult selections tests. Following lengthy training as a combat medic at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, he was sent to South Vietnam. In May 1965, while on a combat patrol in the Central Highlands southeast of Pleiku, he was severely wounded in the knee by a feces-covered punji stick. He was already taking an antibiotic for dysentery, and no ill effects from the punji stick were seen. He used a cotton swab and an adhesive bandage, then finished the patrol. However, he developed a serious infection in his leg, and was flown to Walter Reed Hospital in the United States. Sadler's doctors were forced to surgically enlarge the wound to drain it and to administer penicillin. While he was recuperating, he heard Senator Robert F. Kennedy dedicate the new JFK Center for Special Warfare at Fort Bragg. Sadler promised himself that if he successfully fought off the infection, he would give away the rights to his song "The Ballad of the Green Berets". He recovered completely and kept his promise.
All credits to Wikipedia 2011
 
Old 07-17-2011, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,780 posts, read 21,833,733 times
Reputation: 27855
Norm, this is the first time that I have ever heard the story behind "The Ballad of the Green Berets". Very interesting.
 
Old 07-17-2011, 08:54 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,162 posts, read 38,978,487 times
Reputation: 28158
That's not the whole story of Barry Sadler he was a complex person. He died at the age of 49. He will be remembered by many.


Rich
 
Old 07-21-2011, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Glen Mills
699 posts, read 831,697 times
Reputation: 423
Default A lady's gotta do, what she's gotta do!!!!

Dorothy Lawrence:
This dynamic lady was born in Polesworth, Warwickshire (4 October 1896-1964). From the very beginning Dorothy Lawrence had a strong desire to be a war reporter. In the year 1914, with the commencement of World War 1, she strongly tried to get employed as a war reporter but it seemed improbable since, men also had a reportedly tough time to procure the same job. She finally managed to secretly pose as a man and thus became a soldier in World War 1. She was assisted by two English soldiers who helped her cut her hair in the typical military style. She underwent a lot of hardships and even managed to use a forged identity later on. Due to ill health, she finally presented herself to the commanding sergeant. After this incident, she was declared as a spy. Her tale of disguising herself as woman was kept under wraps for fear many women would follow suit. She was not even permitted to write or publish any articles regarding the same. It was only after the end of World War One, Dorothy Lawrence wrote about all her experiences, which was finally discovered by a historian.
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