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Old 11-30-2011, 07:56 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,572 posts, read 21,756,199 times
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My daughter is in 10th grade. She is an excellent student, and she is already thinking about college.

She excels Science and Math. She enjoys helping others, and volunteers through our church at a local health care clinic for the underprivileged. She enjoys this work very much.

She is consequently thinking of helping to pay her way through college through military service after college.

With her interests in mind what would be her best options?

She thought of the Guard because here in Wilkes-Barre, they came to help during the flood this past fall. She had their opportunity to meet some Guardsman and Women during the flood crisis here and she was impressed by their, service.

Any ideas would be helpful!
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Schertz
581 posts, read 1,005,437 times
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Simply put, what does she want to do after school? Nurse, Lawyer, Doctor? If she has good scores in math and science, then she really can do anything opened to her,it's just a matter of her likes. Now, I'm not familiar with Air National Guard. I was Army and now Reserves but characteristics are different but the foundation is the same, to help our communites, state, and country. Why not Active service? In any case, have her research jobs online that fit her goals. She's already spoken with people involved so she's on the path. Also have her look at all the other branches, Reserve and Active. She may find something more attuned to her. Have her speak with a recruiter next year. He or she will have better information for her. Good luck to you both.
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Old 12-01-2011, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Indy
664 posts, read 2,573,232 times
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Also have her speak with the ROTC detachment at the school she wants to attend. They usually have a few scholarships available.
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Old 12-02-2011, 01:19 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,572 posts, read 21,756,199 times
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She would like to be physician. That would be her first choice. She has also thought about becoming a PA or a Nurse Practitioner.

I have been somewhat hesitant to encourage her to attempt medical school because I have known quite a few people who were very bright in High School, and received mediocre grades in college, thus ruining their GPAs and futures in other fields.

I have thought that Physician's Assistant or Nurse Practitioner might be better routes.
She is in Honors Chemistry now and her average is B+ - A-.

Is ROTC the main way to do this? Or do some people owe the military time after graduation?
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Old 12-02-2011, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,189 posts, read 14,068,763 times
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You definitely need to hook up with a recruiter because all the rules and programs change and you want the most current information available. I went into the Air Force and we had a few young ladies that were either Guard or Reserve going through basic and tech school with us. My older son joined the Junior ROTC when he was a junior in high school. I did not want him to do this but signed his paper any way because this is what he wanted to do. He attended college, 3 years - year round (very bright too like your daughter), used those weekends, summer camp and whenever he could get extra time in at the unit, plus the scholarships and pretty much paid his entire way through school. I can't remember if he owed time or not but was planning to go active duty Army when he got out. He was an officer once out of college. He went active Army for 3 years and then went back to the Army Reserve where he has been active for several years (active - full-time Reserve and made Major at 33 years old, very good money). With the Reserve, it gives him the flexibility to revert to the weekend/2 week summer camp if he chooses. He now has a Master's degree. The military offers an excellent opportunity to continue one's education. It is VERY important to have a plan of what you want to accomplish in order to make the military work for you and to be very careful - IF it is not in the contract, it does not matter what the recruiter or anyone says, any job or assignment to a particular location MUST be in WRITING on the CONTRACT. You should both talk with the recruiter of your choice and it doesn't hurt to talk to different branches just to see what they have to offer at this time and then try to see if your daughter can talk to a female in the branch of her choice. I think it can be a really good choice. My mother absolutely hated my going into the Air Force and made it more than known - ah, but she never approved of anything I did so...........I even considered going back in to the Guard or Reserve but life just turned and twisted and time passed by quickly. There is much to be said for any branch of the military and it can be used to one's advantage if they have a plan and generally that does involve getting an education/travel etc.
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Old 12-02-2011, 05:26 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,516,574 times
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I think it's not a bad idea for a young person in difficult economic times, but there are ways to get on track to serve as an officer which is the way to go. Look into all the options. JROTC/ROTC is a good start.
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Old 12-02-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Schertz
581 posts, read 1,005,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
She would like to be physician. That would be her first choice. She has also thought about becoming a PA or a Nurse Practitioner.

I have been somewhat hesitant to encourage her to attempt medical school because I have known quite a few people who were very bright in High School, and received mediocre grades in college, thus ruining their GPAs and futures in other fields.

I have thought that Physician's Assistant or Nurse Practitioner might be better routes.
She is in Honors Chemistry now and her average is B+ - A-.

Is ROTC the main way to do this? Or do some people owe the military time after graduation?

Well, first, have her look over some medical careers. Look at Physicans, PAs, RNs, Pharmacist, and even allied health professionals. While she might like being a Physican, she may find that the course load and time invested might not be what she wants but she may find something else better suited. There are dozens of medical disciplines out there that can satisfy her career goals as well as pocketbook. May not have that MD behind her name but she'll enjoy her work.

Speak with an JROTC/ROTC detachment at her school. If she does decide to go to college while in the ROTC, she will more than likely have some type of Active component commitment but she'll be an officer. Also speak with any Guard and Reserve recruiters. There are a good amount of programs and scholarships through colleges and universities that one can use involving military service. Though again, rules and policies do change every hour. For anything medical, I would recommend the military route. The price of tuition and increasing debt from that can be stifling. Saved me a pretty penny.

But why discourage her from trying medical school? If she's as bright and together as you say she is, if she really WANTS to be a doctor or nurse, educate her that she'll have to bust a little in college. You never know, she may surprise you. And if she continues to volunteer, it'll only help with admissions. I've known those who also were bright in high school and then fell off. But I've also seen plenty who were bright in high school and continued to be bright in college and beyond. That being said, good on you for helping her try to find her way.
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Old 12-02-2011, 09:31 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,136 posts, read 38,883,622 times
Reputation: 28104
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
She would like to be physician. That would be her first choice. She has also thought about becoming a PA or a Nurse Practitioner.

I have been somewhat hesitant to encourage her to attempt medical school because I have known quite a few people who were very bright in High School, and received mediocre grades in college, thus ruining their GPAs and futures in other fields.

I have thought that Physician's Assistant or Nurse Practitioner might be better routes.
She is in Honors Chemistry now and her average is B+ - A-.

Is ROTC the main way to do this? Or do some people owe the military time after graduation?
Physicians Assistant (PA) is common in the military.

Nursing is also common in the military.

ROTC is one way to do it. Get your college paid for and pay back by serving in the military. As a commissioned officer I have seen nurses who make Captain (O-3) before their four year obligation is up. If you are not familiar with the military pay, the 2012 pay with an o-3 with over 4 years service is $5,031.00. That does not include other pay, benefits and allowances...

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) is a college-based, officer commissioning program. ROTC produces officers in all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. ROTC graduates constitute 56 percent of U.S. Army, 11 percent of U.S. Marine Corps, 20 percent of U.S. Navy, and 41 percent of U.S. Air Force officers, for a combined 39 percent of all active duty officers in the Department of Defense.

Each of the U.S. Armed Forces offer competitive, merit-based scholarships to students, often covering full tuition for college in exchange for extended periods of active military service. The U.S. Coast Guard offers a similar program to ROTC under a different name: CSPI. For example, in the U.S. Army ROTC, students who receive an Army ROTC scholarship must agree to complete a four year period of service with the Army after college.

Many of the military nurses I met over the years got their fully funded degree through ROTC.

JROTC Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps, is a high school program, does not really produce college credit. Can be a help to the student. My granddaughter was in the program her last three years of High School.

My granddaughter is amongst this group, (Marine Corp's JROTC during a Veterans day ceremony):



Rich
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:25 PM
 
738 posts, read 928,525 times
Reputation: 991
Has she thought about a military academy? If she is interested, contact your congressman.
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