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Old 12-22-2011, 01:04 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,041 posts, read 35,387,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermaine88 View Post
I'm a techie/geek/nerd kinda person. The Navy and Air Force seem to be most high tech branches.
The Army has a few "high tech" jobs... The Army sent me to electronics schools at Ft Devans, Redstone Arsenal, Ft Huachauca, Ft Monmouth, Ft Meade and a few other places.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermaine88 View Post
I was majoring in Aviation (I was a student pilot)for a while, that got expensive,
My wife and I are are Private Pilots. We owned our own plane, and also part owners of a few others, still members of EAA and AOPA. I started flying when I was 14 but finally got my plane and license while I was in the Army stationed in Maryland.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermaine88 View Post
I still have this insane interest for aviation and anything dealing with the sky. I'm a very active hobbyist programmer, and basically a computer geek.
The Army sent me to HP, Watkins-Johnson, Tektronics schools in the Bethesda, Rockville and Baltimore area to program various electronics systems. I was fortunate to attend two Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University courses in Munich, Germany in the 80's.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermaine88 View Post
So the Navy and Air Force seem to be the best choices.
Seemed? After my 22 year Army stint, I retired and was a consultant for 10 years. Then I basically fully retired at the age of 51, I might work a couple of weeks per year to meet up with old buddies....

You going for a technical career? Take the longest technical school which you can grab, and make sure you complete it... There are a lot of in's and out's in the Army.

Good luck to you...


Rich
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Old 12-22-2011, 07:24 AM
 
3,069 posts, read 7,149,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jermaine88 View Post
I'm a techie/geek/nerd kinda person. The Navy and Air Force seem to be most high tech branches.
I was majoring in Aviation (I was a student pilot)for a while, that got expensive, and the economy and jobs prospect turned really REALLY crappy. So I took up business.

(I am also 100% fluent in French, Spanish, currently trying to learn Chinese.)

I still have this insane interest for aviation and anything dealing with the sky. I'm a very active hobbyist programmer, and basically a computer geek. It's probably a little too late to be a fighter pilot, but just getting into the aviation/computer field, would be cool.
So the Navy and Air Force seem to be the best choices.
I'm a Marine Corps recruiter, but every branch has "high tech" jobs. I beleive some of the posters on this board were aviaition in the Army. The majority of the people I've put in the Marine Corps either work in aviation or electronics. On the oddicer side, Aviation is the largest Job field at almost 30% of Officers. And that is strictly pilots and and navigation/flight officers. That doesn't even include other related aviation fields. The AF has about 150 different Jobs, the Marines have almost 300. I'm sure the Army, the beast it is, has even more than that. The missions of the Marine and the Army or more varied than the AF or Navy so they have more job options that cover that breadth of missions. The ironic thing is that you have a better chance of getting the tech or aviation job you want in the Army or Marines, b/c of how jobs are chosen, than you do in the Navy or AF. I will say, the absolute best job opportunity in the military, based on civilian opportunity and pay, is the nuke field in the Navy. That said, you have to have a mighty fine ASVAB score to qualify.
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,088 posts, read 44,253,299 times
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I have been through expansions and down-sizing in the military. Keep in mind that even when the force size is being reduced, they are still recruiting.

Over-all the military is a young man's job; 18-24 year olds. NCOs and officers make up a smaller portion.

Every year people get out. People at their 4-year mark get out, people at their 10-year mark get out, people at their 20-year mark get out. So by reducing the over-all number of slots [in the Navy we call them billets], the force gets reduced without any actual pain in the process.

There have been times of forced draw-down [under Clinton] where they were reviewing each person's performance at re-enlistment time, and only allowing a percentage to re-enlist. That was painful for the guys who were focused to making it a career. I have a buddy who was at 18-years in his career, when they refused to allow him to re-enlist [only stellar performance, no bad marks, simply not enough billets]

It all depends on how forcefully the administration wants the draw-down to be.

I doubt if anyone is going to cut pay or benefits to Active Duty personnel. The training generally gets better and more advanced gradually over time as well. The computer techs coming out in the 1980s were better suited to the 1980s, today's computer techs are better suited to today's computer industry. The training keeps pace.

They are always recruiting, as there are always openings.



Arny / Navy / Air Force / Coast Guard / Marine: I won't go there. Everyone is needed, everyone has their place, all 'serve'.



I have served with a lot of Navy Nukes. There are other ratings closely related to Nukes that also get lumped in together as being very highly focused and trained. Their pay is good, their bonuses are astronomical, their benefits are great; but the job really truly is 'focused', and very few individuals can handle the stress and deployment schedule. Only after doing 20-years are retiring am I now finally realizing just how focused that was and the sacrifices that were made in order to stay in that career field.
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Old 12-22-2011, 10:01 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,041 posts, read 35,387,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macjr82 View Post
The AF has about 150 different Jobs, the Marines have almost 300. I'm sure the Army, the beast it is, has even more than that.
I had met a lot of Marines who had come over to the Army and Marines who attended Army schools.

I believe it is easier for enlisted personal to change careers in the Army (If you are willing to give up that big re-enlistment bonus, I did). I will just say I was in more than three career fields and there are a lot of good assignments as well as bad assignments in the Army.

Although I traveled a lot at times (500+ TDY days in 5 years) one regret (after the fact) was that I should have taken one more 3 year tour with my family in Europe or perhaps Asia.


Rich
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Old 12-22-2011, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,088 posts, read 44,253,299 times
Reputation: 15112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
I had met a lot of Marines who had come over to the Army and Marines who attended Army schools.
I never saw anyone from another branch attend a Navy school. The only school I ever attended in another branch was an Air Force school [and in it were Navy, A.F. and Marines].



Quote:
... I believe it is easier for enlisted personal to change careers in the Army (If you are willing to give up that big re-enlistment bonus, I did). I will just say I was in more than three career fields and there are a lot of good assignments as well as bad assignments in the Army.
That is very nearly impossible in the Navy.

I made inquiry a couple times. There is a procedure, but you need to get E9s from both career fields to agree to sign recommendations approving it, before your request has any chance of being approved.

In the Navy, we have communities [air, sub, gator, construction, carrier, tin can, diver, UDT]. Each of these communities tend to get tunnel vision and insist that no body can leave that community. Attempts to leave are seen as bucking the system, disruptive and against good order/discipline.



Quote:
... Although I traveled a lot at times (500+ TDY days in 5 years) one regret (after the fact) was that I should have taken one more 3 year tour with my family in Europe or perhaps Asia.

Rich
Best thing I ever did.
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:42 AM
 
3,069 posts, read 7,149,467 times
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Marines attend Navy aviation schools. This includes pilots, mechanics, electricians, and airfield/flightline services in Pensacola and airfield operations in Meridian. I believe the defense language institute is run by the Navy and all branches go there. Presidio de Monterey in California. Also the military music school is in Little Creek Naval Base and every branch attends except Air Force. There are many other joint services schools like the media school in Maryland. Marines specifically do a lot of joint training and attend other branches schools and have Marine Corps detachments for our job schools aboard other bases.

I know the Navy is horrible for cross-training. They even have a saying for it. "Choose your rate, choose your fate "

My speaking of Nuke was not a military career but an excellent door into a civilian one. There is a reason for those astronomical bonuses. Because nukes get out after one enlistment and make astronomical money in the civilian world for a lot less stress.
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, NC
1,490 posts, read 4,766,604 times
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Here is the job for you. French is a good language for Africa operations.

1A8X1 - AIRBORNE CRYPTOLOGIC LINGUIST
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:53 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,041 posts, read 35,387,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macjr82 View Post
I believe the defense language institute is run by the Navy and all branches go there. Presidio de Monterey in California.
It use to be called DLI and it was scattered at various places (Fort Bliss Texas and Presidio of San Francisco for example.) And I think a few services ran some small classes... But, here is the latest:
Quote:
The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC) is regarded as one of the finest schools for foreign language instruction in the nation. As part of the Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), the Institute provides resident instruction at the Presidio of Monterey in 23 languages and two dialects,

DLIFLC.edu - About DLIFLC
Rich

ADDED - Reading on from the above URL, some history:
Quote:
The U.S. Air Force met most of its foreign language training requirements in the 1950s through contract programs at universities such as Yale, Cornell, Indiana, and Syracuse. The U.S. Navy taught foreign languages at the Naval Intelligence School in Washington, D.C. In 1963, to promote efficiency and economy, these programs were consolidated into the Defense Foreign Language Program. A new headquarters, the Defense Language Institute (DLI), was established in Washington, D.C., and the former Army Language School commandant, Colonel James L. Collins, Jr., became the Institute’s first director. The Army Language School became the DLI West Coast Branch, and the foreign language department at the Naval Intelligence School became the DLI East Coast Branch. The contract programs were gradually phased out. The DLI also took over the English Language School at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, which became the DLI English Language Center (DLIELC).

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 12-22-2011 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:14 PM
 
175 posts, read 241,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
There have been times of forced draw-down [under Clinton] where they were reviewing each person's performance at re-enlistment time, and only allowing a percentage to re-enlist. That was painful for the guys who were focused to making it a career. I have a buddy who was at 18-years in his career, when they refused to allow him to re-enlist [only stellar performance, no bad marks, simply not enough billets]

It all depends on how forcefully the administration wants the draw-down to be.
Yes, I mean the rumors right now are saying that they could be doing this as far as cutting back by not allowing re-enlistments and such but who knows what will really happen as they are just rumors for now. Anything could change particularly depending on who we wind up electing (or re-electing depending how this turns out) next. Like some others have said, there are actually a lot of high tech jobs in the Army as there is almost every job to be found there. It all depends on what you're looking for in the service. You're more likely to get a guaranteed job in your contract with the Army and again as others said, chances to re-class if need be though again that could always change depending on how the draw-down may come about.

Another thing to consider is whether or not we end up going to a majority "peace-time Army". I say majority just because even in so-called peace-time, the Army will always be sending people to other countries to help out and not all of them safe places. In any case, as far as this being a good time to join, I guess it depends both on what happens in the next few years with our war-time deployments as well as what exactly you're looking to get out of it. This may not apply to you since you're looking more on the "high tech" job side but I've seen guys interested in combat arms looking at it from both sides. Some are fine with moving more towards a peace-time Army for various reasons from having deployed more than once and looking forward to more time at home all the way to those who join more to say they're a part of the infantry but don't actually want to have to deploy and potentially fight so they're happy to stay in garrison instead. Others are not looking as forward to peace-time Army because as much as they likely enjoy being home with their families and friends, they dislike the idea of doing a lot of combat arms training but never really getting to use it in a deployment. Those guys in infantry and similar end up doing a lot of boring and seemingly pointless details when not deployed and training doesn't stop but sometimes can feel more frustrating if you know you're not training to use it in any upcoming deployment. So again it depends on whether or not Afghanistan really does dwindle down and we don't jump into any more conflicts as well as what exactly you're hoping to get out of deployment.
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:20 PM
 
175 posts, read 241,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by th3vault View Post
The Marine Corps is the only branch that still trains males and females separately. They are housed separately in all branches.
Just to clarify a little here. The Army does have some Basic Training that is still only males and that's for those with combat arms jobs such as infantry. Ft. Benning and Ft. Knox are still male only basic training locations whereas there are both females and males at Ft. Leonard Wood, Ft. Jackson, and Ft. Sill (Sill just opened up to females a couple years ago). Also at the gender integrated training locations, males and females are housed separately as far as not being in the same rooms but they're still usually in the same building. Many times they're separated by floors in the buildings and I even know of some guys who said their platoon was on the same floor as one of the female platoons but was separated by an door that had an alarm on it at night. The locations with males and females do all their training right alongside each other working together.
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