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Old 01-01-2012, 04:53 AM
 
4,159 posts, read 4,196,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xsthomas View Post
Those are the ones that were lied to by the recruiter about what they would be doing after they signed on.
I'm not sure. I would think they were too pampered by the "University of Mom and Dad" prior to joining up, then wham!. They actually have to get up at a certain time, go to work on time, and work!. That for many people was just "too much". I was always amazed how so many people just could not show up to work on time and never felt they did anything wrong.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:48 PM
 
4,424 posts, read 5,209,880 times
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There may be jobs that 11Bs get hired for but nothing that is an equivalent. Last time I checked there were no bunkers needing to be taken out around here. Heck, even when I went to ACAP the instructor sat me down at the job search computer and told me to type in my MOS and it would list civilian equivalent jobs. I typed in "11" and he said "Get up! There aint a single thing out there for you". Sure I could get a job somewhere because i was in the military but the only thing 11B adds to my resume is the fact that I know how to take orders and clean equipment.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:09 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 4,597,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zembonez View Post
^^^ This.

You only hear about the pathetic losers who only signed up for the check and free college.
I hope this attitude has gone away as we enter our second decade at war. It was very pronounced in the late 80's, early 90's when I was in and it drove me nuts. The only - only - time I ever flat out chewed up and spit out a soldier in my time in the service is when we got off the plane for Desert Sheild and one of my RTO's started up with the "I don't want to be here, I just signed up for the college money" whine. Here got a very loud, very sucinct reminder of what he actually had signed up for.

Never heard that complaint from the rest of the soldiers in the company again.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,517,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pythonis View Post
There may be jobs that 11Bs get hired for but nothing that is an equivalent.
The opening that I mentioned is for 11B personnel to do exactly the job for which they are trained to do.



Quote:
... Last time I checked there were no bunkers needing to be taken out around here.
Even the Army does not have 11B personnel doing that job in your home town. The Army ships them to somewhere else where the job is needed.

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Old 01-03-2012, 01:24 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 4,597,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pythonis View Post
There may be jobs that 11Bs get hired for but nothing that is an equivalent. Last time I checked there were no bunkers needing to be taken out around here. Heck, even when I went to ACAP the instructor sat me down at the job search computer and told me to type in my MOS and it would list civilian equivalent jobs. I typed in "11" and he said "Get up! There aint a single thing out there for you". Sure I could get a job somewhere because i was in the military but the only thing 11B adds to my resume is the fact that I know how to take orders and clean equipment.
Don't sell yourself short.

Service in the infantry, or any of the combat arms, comes with an extra dose of all those intangible qualities civillian employers like to get from vets - discipline, teamwork, drive for results, can do attitude, ability to work under pressure, leadership, followership etc. Whenever we had to do something hard or crappy or both, we used to always joke that it "builds charachter". That's actually true. And 11B's get to "build charachter" more then just about any other MOS. Employers like that charachter. You can teach anyone how to do most jobs, but its the intangibles that make a really good hire. Don't forget that you bring those to the table & that they are valued.
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:05 PM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,475,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OC Investor2 View Post
Don't sell yourself short.

Service in the infantry, or any of the combat arms, comes with an extra dose of all those intangible qualities civillian employers like to get from vets - discipline, teamwork, drive for results, can do attitude, ability to work under pressure, leadership, followership etc. Whenever we had to do something hard or crappy or both, we used to always joke that it "builds charachter". That's actually true. And 11B's get to "build charachter" more then just about any other MOS. Employers like that charachter. You can teach anyone how to do most jobs, but its the intangibles that make a really good hire. Don't forget that you bring those to the table & that they are valued.
Hey now ... don't get too carried away . I don't take anything away from infantry, 11B, whatever ... hard nasty stuff ... but there's lots of hard nasty stuff that "builds character". I recall another Vietnam vet saying something similar to the effect: if you didn't get a CIB you weren't there ... Well, I don't have a CIB ... all I did was pull pilots and 11B's out of the bush in air rescue ... yet I distinctly recall being there, flying in at hundreds of mph loaded with tons of ordinance making copious quantities of noise, fire, concussion, and mud -- and flying out sometimes holding bloody tourniquets and body parts in bags (and my arse) -- until I got wrecked enough myself to be medical'd out and hospitalized. Silly airmen. No CIB. No character? No offense. None intended. None taken. And furthermore, I know some folks never in service or war who did things like fight forest fires for a living who seem to have plenty character ... Just sayin'.
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:47 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 4,597,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Hey now ... don't get too carried away . I don't take anything away from infantry, 11B, whatever ... hard nasty stuff ... but there's lots of hard nasty stuff that "builds character". I recall another Vietnam vet saying something similar to the effect: if you didn't get a CIB you weren't there ... Well, I don't have a CIB ... all I did was pull pilots and 11B's out of the bush in air rescue ... yet I distinctly recall being there, flying in at hundreds of mph loaded with tons of ordinance making copious quantities of noise, fire, concussion, and mud -- and flying out sometimes holding bloody tourniquets and body parts in bags (and my arse) -- until I got wrecked enough myself to be medical'd out and hospitalized. Silly airmen. No CIB. No character? No offense. None intended. None taken. And furthermore, I know some folks never in service or war who did things like fight forest fires for a living who seem to have plenty character ... Just sayin'.
Easy there, airman. Just pointing out to an old 11B that his service in the Queen of Battle has been a valuable experience that is marketable in the civillian workforce.

However, I do think that the infantry has it harder then most. Its where most of the bleeding & dying is done. Even when your not fighting its rough duty. That's probably why the army invented the EIB/CIB - to honor men who had some of the hardest service. Its not a statement meant to exclude anyone or belittle others, just an acknowldegement. And this is coming from a former Artilleryman, so I am not included in the fraternity.

As for the comment you mentioned, Someone who mocks combat service that does not result in a CIB probably did'nt have a hard time earning their CIB. Thanks for your service!
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,116 posts, read 20,158,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
The opening that I mentioned is for 11B personnel to do exactly the job for which they are trained to do.





Even the Army does not have 11B personnel doing that job in your home town. The Army ships them to somewhere else where the job is needed.

Ever been a Police Officer/ Fireman/ EMT?

Going armed and knocking down doors comes with some jobs
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Old 01-03-2012, 06:10 PM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,475,247 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by OC Investor2 View Post
Easy there, airman. Just pointing out to an old 11B that his service in the Queen of Battle has been a valuable experience that is marketable in the civillian workforce.

However, I do think that the infantry has it harder then most. Its where most of the bleeding & dying is done. Even when your not fighting its rough duty. That's probably why the army invented the EIB/CIB - to honor men who had some of the hardest service. Its not a statement meant to exclude anyone or belittle others, just an acknowldegement. And this is coming from a former Artilleryman, so I am not included in the fraternity.

As for the comment you mentioned, Someone who mocks combat service that does not result in a CIB probably did'nt have a hard time earning their CIB. Thanks for your service!
Oh no problemo at all ... I have a good sense of humor ... and, as I wrote: no offense taken .... not a bit. Furthermore, I acknowledge the infantry with full respect due ... unquestioned ... and my point remains: there are actually quite a number of particularly grueling jobs / professions, both in the military and non-military, that offer just as much "character development".

As far as rough duty "when you're not fighting", I'd step up in a heartbeat to point to life on a carrier flight deck ... same in peace as in war just about ... constant operations ... one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. But you can even beat that in a season of winter crab fishing in Alaska. I got a pocketful of more comparables. Infantry is bloody tough duty. So are a lot of other things a person can find to do in life. Growing up in certain city neighborhoods is quite a challenge to character itself.

Hats off to the infantry (really) ... and hats off to everybody else who has the backbone in life to pull a straight course in heavy seas.
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,517,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
Ever been a Police Officer/ Fireman/ EMT?

Going armed and knocking down doors comes with some jobs
I have been an MP serving both stateside and in combat; and I have been an EMT.
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