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Old 12-29-2011, 09:15 AM
 
4,914 posts, read 5,522,333 times
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First and foremost let me say that I respect any person who puts his/her life on the line for the rest of us Americans.

My question is, when you make the conscious decision to join the armed forces, you're fully aware of the chances that you will be deployed overseas whether its to participate in battle, or be stationed elsewhere. So when the time comes to be deployed, why is it that many soldiers and their families take it so hard. Even further more, complain about being there and wanting to come back home to be with the family. I personally know many active duty members who constantly say that all they want to do is come home. So what baffles me is, why enlist in the first place if all you're going to do is be depressed, stressed, and in some cases, resort to committing suicide about being away from home? I hope i'm not coming off as "insensitive", but it just doesnt make sense to me. I myself know that I would not want to be in that predicament, therefore I never had any urge to join the military, and if I were indeed one of those who wanted to join the military, I would accept all aspects of it and not complain about being deployed and away from home. I can understand this behavior if there was a draft in place, but these people I speak of Voluntarily join.

Last edited by louie0406; 12-29-2011 at 09:31 AM..
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:42 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 4,283,584 times
Reputation: 3402
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevel79 View Post
First and foremost let me say that I respect any person who puts his/her life on the line for the rest of us Americans.

My question is, when you make the conscious decision to join the armed forces, you're fully aware of the chances that you will be deployed overseas whether its to participate in battle, or be stationed elsewhere. So when the time comes to be deployed, why is it that many soldiers and their families take it so hard. Even further more, complain about being there and wanting to come back home to be with the family. I personally know many active duty members who constantly say that all they want to do is come home. So what baffles me is, why enlist in the first place if all you're going to do is be depressed, stressed, and in some cases, resort to committing suicide about being away from home? I hope i'm not coming off as "insensitive", but it just doesnt make sense to me. I myself know that I would not want to be in that predicament, therefore I never had any urge to join the military, and if I were indeed one of those who wanted to join the military, I would accept all aspects of it and not complain about being deployed and away from home. I can understand this behavior if there was a draft in place, but these people I speak of Voluntarily join.
There are hundreds of thousands of US troops - the great majority of the troops and their families accept deployments as a regular part of life and
"suck it up" with little to no complaining.....

Huh? PTSD is about a little more than missing home...... your post is really insensitive to say the least....

Yeah, right... accept all aspects? Unless you are in the military and deployed you don't even have a clue as to what "all aspects" are, much less that you'd accept them without complaining!
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:41 AM
 
1,738 posts, read 3,883,003 times
Reputation: 4566
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakeneko View Post
There are hundreds of thousands of US troops - the great majority of the troops and their families accept deployments as a regular part of life and
"suck it up" with little to no complaining.....

Huh? PTSD is about a little more than missing home...... your post is really insensitive to say the least....

Yeah, right... accept all aspects? Unless you are in the military and deployed you don't even have a clue as to what "all aspects" are, much less that you'd accept them without complaining!
Don't be so sensitive. I think the OP has a legitimate inquiry. I would tell the OP in all honesty that the complaining he/she hears stems from the fact the military changes the rules on you all the time. That causes friction. Also, the person's values and personal priorities when first entering the military do shift as life and family morph into the different life stages we go through. At some point, the lifestyle of military service is no longer congruent with what we want for ourselves and our families. At that point, once again, friction ensues.

One has to determine what is most important to oneself and family. Military service of any kind is appreciated. I have no problems accepting the mantra of doing it until it is no longer tenable. That is still more than the majority of citizens do for this Country anyways. As I reach my seventh year of commissioned service I have come to roost on adopting this philosophy. I'll continue to serve until I can no longer tolerate to do so. There are many many elements of military life I don't agree with, but it hasn't hit "Im through!" territory yet. When it does, I'll act accordingly. One needs not have rank on your arm/shoulders to have Honor.

The point is to say, it is not all an irresponsible "lack of research" that leads to these "frictions"; the military changes and takes things back on you, and you also change in your priorities as you go through your contract. Hopefully this provides some context as to why the complaining is not all gratuitous and the result of lack of research.
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,116 posts, read 20,148,778 times
Reputation: 8204
I joined the miltary to blow things up. That's what I did and I was good at it. Being stationed in the US is only so you can practice for the time when you actually blow things up. I was born to do this and thank GOD that there is a place like the Army where I can do what I enjoy and get paid for it
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,693 posts, read 22,464,412 times
Reputation: 14290
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevel79 View Post
First and foremost let me say that I respect any person who puts his/her life on the line for the rest of us Americans.

My question is, when you make the conscious decision to join the armed forces, you're fully aware of the chances that you will be deployed overseas whether its to participate in battle, or be stationed elsewhere. So when the time comes to be deployed, why is it that many soldiers and their families take it so hard. Even further more, complain about being there and wanting to come back home to be with the family. I personally know many active duty members who constantly say that all they want to do is come home. So what baffles me is, why enlist in the first place if all you're going to do is be depressed, stressed, and in some cases, resort to committing suicide about being away from home? I hope i'm not coming off as "insensitive", but it just doesnt make sense to me. I myself know that I would not want to be in that predicament, therefore I never had any urge to join the military, and if I were indeed one of those who wanted to join the military, I would accept all aspects of it and not complain about being deployed and away from home. I can understand this behavior if there was a draft in place, but these people I speak of Voluntarily join.
You are facing a perception issue here. The only people you hear from or about are people who are discontented, unhappy, disgruntled or have other sad situations. You are not taking into account that there are tens of thousands of service members who do their duty with no complaints and some even really enjoy it.

It is human nature that some people are not going to like their situation even if it is one of their own choosing. I work alongside many people who have the freedom to quit and find another job and yet they choose to stay somewhere that supposedly is so terrible.

As far as suicide due to homesickness, they probably had some underlying issues to beging with. Also, many Marines, soliders, etc. are young bucks who have never been away from home so it affects them in ways they did not expect.
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Old 12-29-2011, 11:00 AM
 
1,738 posts, read 3,883,003 times
Reputation: 4566
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
I joined the miltary to blow things up. That's what I did and I was good at it. Being stationed in the US is only so you can practice for the time when you actually blow things up. I was born to do this and thank GOD that there is a place like the Army where I can do what I enjoy and get paid for it
LOL Then you make rank and get told the duty of blowing stuff up is no longer the focus of your existence, making rank is. And more "friction" ensues.... I'm telling y'all, life is a moving target. Only fools attempt to freeze frame life.

To your point though, the ARMY does have the warrant officer rank, which is exactly that, a tactical expert who essentially does not get forced out of the "mish". The Air Force sure could use some of that wisdom. I know I'd take a 25% paycut to get told all I have to do is do my primary job until I can no longer medically do so, and not worry about time-in-grade affect my ability to serve my country to my heart's content. But I digress. I should start a "things that weren't accurately disclosed in the brochure when I signed the dotted line..."
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Old 12-29-2011, 11:02 AM
 
358 posts, read 561,355 times
Reputation: 532
There is a popular portrayal of military people out there that is grossly oversimplified.

I'm not a media-hater, but there are some media outlets that push a lot of these "bring the troops home" or likewise "bring us home" stories because it fits conveniently with the larger arguement about whether our country should be conducting these operations in the first place.

Also, I would argue that our society as a whole is more comfortable with the idea that the 'troops want to come home' than the alternative, which is are guys might like what they are doing over there and are actually compensated relatively well for it. We are no so comfortable discussing this, so it doesn't get much coverage. Bottom line: people have varied experiences over there and deal with it differently.

A lot of it comes down to politics. The Department of Defense is a very, very big place. A thousand different types of people, different jobs, different motives, different levels of committment. Despite this, people who are looking to make a point will try to characterize the entire defense effort in a way that suits their purposes.

So there are some mythologies out there. In the 60s, one popular myth was that we were all baby killers. You could argue that the pendullum has swung close to the other extreme at this point...now everyone wants to cast military people as hapless victims of this or that policy. You are right we are not victims, we signed up to the volunteer force.

We are in a much better place than we were in the 60s of course, and sometimes these myths serve a good purpose and correct past wrongs...but it doesn't make terribly accurate portrayals of what's really going on at the personal/family level amongst those who join up.

Now aside from all this...there is a line you cross as a nation to where you are now over-extending your military forces...over-using and abusing the committment they made. This line is different for everyone, but it's there and it's real. Despite that fact that military essentially sign themselves over to follow orders, let be real, they have families and that is an equal or greater committment in just about every scenario outside of national survival. So people should be free to speak up and complain it they feel they are on the receiving end of bogus defense policy.
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,116 posts, read 20,148,778 times
Reputation: 8204
Quote:
Originally Posted by hindsight2020 View Post
LOL Then you make rank and get told the duty of blowing stuff up is no longer the focus of your existence, making rank is. And more "friction" ensues.... I'm telling y'all, life is a moving target. Only fools attempt to freeze frame life.

To your point though, the ARMY does have the warrant officer rank, which is exactly that, a tactical expert who essentially does not get forced out of the "mish". The Air Force sure could use some of that wisdom. I know I'd take a 25% paycut to get told all I have to do is do my primary job until I can no longer medically do so, and not worry about time-in-grade affect my ability to serve my country to my heart's content. But I digress. I should start a "things that weren't accurately disclosed in the brochure when I signed the dotted line..."
Yeah turning a good soldier into a lousy supervisor is where the military falls down. I actuaally moved backward from Field Artillery Cannons to 4.2 in Mortars to stay with a primitive weapon system I enjoyed. I always found E-6 to be my best rank, from E-7 on you were busy with Vogon work

Vogon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-29-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,480 posts, read 4,366,654 times
Reputation: 1418
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevel79 View Post
First and foremost let me say that I respect any person who puts his/her life on the line for the rest of us Americans.

My question is, when you make the conscious decision to join the armed forces, you're fully aware of the chances that you will be deployed overseas whether its to participate in battle, or be stationed elsewhere. So when the time comes to be deployed, why is it that many soldiers and their families take it so hard. Even further more, complain about being there and wanting to come back home to be with the family. I personally know many active duty members who constantly say that all they want to do is come home. So what baffles me is, why enlist in the first place if all you're going to do is be depressed, stressed, and in some cases, resort to committing suicide about being away from home? I hope i'm not coming off as "insensitive", but it just doesnt make sense to me. I myself know that I would not want to be in that predicament, therefore I never had any urge to join the military, and if I were indeed one of those who wanted to join the military, I would accept all aspects of it and not complain about being deployed and away from home. I can understand this behavior if there was a draft in place, but these people I speak of Voluntarily join.
I don't know, and that's a fair question. Everyone gets homesick but that's to be expected. No one can really can really grasp the hardship of going to war before they experience it and there's really no way to tell how each person will deal with it when the time comes. (I have not seen combat, thank God.)

What amazed me was that there were men in basic training who seemed surprised that they were being yelled at and "bossed around" and they acted like they were going to crack. I really don't know what they expected when they joined the military. And this was Navy boot camp, for Pete's sake... it wasn't even that hard! I guess I was just used to having my a$$ chewed out all the time before I ever got there.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,744,983 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by mouzon View Post
There is a popular portrayal of military people out there that is grossly oversimplified.

I'm not a media-hater, but there are some media outlets that push a lot of these "bring the troops home" or likewise "bring us home" stories because it fits conveniently with the larger arguement about whether our country should be conducting these operations in the first place.

Also, I would argue that our society as a whole is more comfortable with the idea that the 'troops want to come home' than the alternative, which is are guys might like what they are doing over there and are actually compensated relatively well for it. We are no so comfortable discussing this, so it doesn't get much coverage. Bottom line: people have varied experiences over there and deal with it differently.

A lot of it comes down to politics. The Department of Defense is a very, very big place. A thousand different types of people, different jobs, different motives, different levels of committment. Despite this, people who are looking to make a point will try to characterize the entire defense effort in a way that suits their purposes.

So there are some mythologies out there. In the 60s, one popular myth was that we were all baby killers. You could argue that the pendullum has swung close to the other extreme at this point...now everyone wants to cast military people as hapless victims of this or that policy. You are right we are not victims, we signed up to the volunteer force.

We are in a much better place than we were in the 60s of course, and sometimes these myths serve a good purpose and correct past wrongs...but it doesn't make terribly accurate portrayals of what's really going on at the personal/family level amongst those who join up.

Now aside from all this...there is a line you cross as a nation to where you are now over-extending your military forces...over-using and abusing the committment they made. This line is different for everyone, but it's there and it's real. Despite that fact that military essentially sign themselves over to follow orders, let be real, they have families and that is an equal or greater committment in just about every scenario outside of national survival. So people should be free to speak up and complain it they feel they are on the receiving end of bogus defense policy.
I would think most people are uncomfortable with the idea of war and that's why they push to have limited engagement whenever possible. War is never pretty, so honestly, those that enjoy that particular aspect of it outside of "serving country" may have some deeper issues to address.
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