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Old 01-15-2012, 10:28 AM
 
894 posts, read 2,812,257 times
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I'm a parent with a child on the spectrum, asperger's,and many parents on one support board have posed the question if their child can join the military. Many parents are reluctant to just ask a recruiter as some consider hiding the dx.

Does anyone here have specific knowledge as to whether someone with asperger's is denied entry into the armed forces based merely on their dx?

Thanks for any input!
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Old 01-15-2012, 11:49 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,080 posts, read 38,745,073 times
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I believe the Army Regulation 'AR 40-501', 'Standards of Medical Fitness' which is the basic regulation used by the entire Department of Defense (DoD) might start you on the path. Here is the regulation in PDF form: http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r40_501.pdf

Quote:
This regulation governs—
a. Medical fitness standards for enlistment, induction, and appointment, including officer procurement programs.
Rich

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 06-13-2013 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 01-16-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,591 posts, read 2,958,517 times
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There are MANY SM's with Aspergers but not revealed to the recruiter either because of fear or or because they were undiagnosed.

People with AS are well suited to the Military because of the structure and I know of five outstanding Officers with AS. One is a Full Bird with high hopes of becoming an BG.

My son has AS and has done very well in the Army. He brought his medical records with him as well as his HS records and NHS involvement, he also went to the State wrestling tournament three years in a role. The year he wasn't on the wrestling team he was in Hawaii and was on the judo team (no wresting at his school).. His scores on the ASVAB surprised the recruiter as he could pick and choose his MOS due to the very high score (the highest score ever in the area. Since he was never on any medication for his AS it was a non-issue.
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:52 AM
 
894 posts, read 2,812,257 times
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Default Thank you for the responses

Still reading the regs you sent Poncho, I also forwarded them to the group. Melanie, thank you for sharing the information about your son. This is absolutely wonderful to read and gives parents like me hope!! Btw, How long has he been in the army?
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:32 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,080 posts, read 38,745,073 times
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Skatergirl; There is no recruiter which can really give a medical evaluation. There are some medical conditions which may disqualify, but the final decision is up to medical personal, for people entering the military the evaluations usually are at the MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Station)

Doing a bit more research I ran into the "United States Military Entrance Processing Command" (USMEPCOM) web site. They have a page of electronic library of administrative publications and forms which may be of additional assistance: United States Military Entrance Processing Command There are other sections also which might be of interest.


Good luck!

Rich

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 06-13-2013 at 11:14 AM..
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,591 posts, read 2,958,517 times
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Skatergirl~
My son enlisted when he was eighteen and has been in almost five years. He is now an NCO and his "by the books" attitude and his adherence to following the rules has made him stand out to his Sr. NCOs and Officers. It has actually been a perfect fit and he is so happy that his days are "set" and there are always "rules" to follow.

I, too was worried when he was younger because I know that most of the world places little value upon daily routines and the urge to be regimented. Please feel free to send me a PM if you'd like to discuss this more privately.
Melanie
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Ashburn, VA
467 posts, read 1,273,008 times
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See the thread "shy nerd as a commissioned officer"

In all seriousness, it depends on where you are on the spectrum. If you are obviously autistic, then no, the military is not a good fit. If you are a shy geeky person who thrives in a highly structured environment, then the military could be the ideal fit.

Don't disclose Aspergers to the recruiter or medical officer. You don't have to volunteer that sort of information, which is a highly subjective diagnosis in any event.

"Many parents are reluctant to just ask a recruiter as some consider hiding the dx."

The kids should be the ones talking to the recruiter. If they aren't up to it, then they are not good fits.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,258 posts, read 10,425,628 times
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quote: "If you are a shy geeky person who thrives in a highly structured environment"

You mean to tell me that they are diagnosing people with Asperger's who are simply shy and geeky? This whole thing is even more out of hand than I, a tremendous skeptic, realized.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,080 posts, read 38,745,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
You mean to tell me that they are diagnosing people with Asperger's who are simply shy and geeky? This whole thing is even more out of hand than I, a tremendous skeptic, realized.
1. Do you believe everything you read on the internet?

2. What do you believe to be "out of hand"?


Rich
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,080 posts, read 38,745,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by looktowindward View Post
You don't have to volunteer that sort of information, which is a highly subjective diagnosis in any event.

Quote:
Deliberate omission, concealment, or falsification of a material fact in any written document or oral statement to the government when applying for security processing, processing for a position of responsibility, or in other official matters is a security concern. Under Title 18 of the U.S. Code, Section 1001, it is also a crime punishable by a fine up to $10,000 and imprisonment for not more than five years, or both.
Quote:
Making false statements (18 U.S.C. § 1001) is the common name for the United States federal crime laid out in Section 1001 of Title 18 of the United States Code, which generally prohibits lying to or concealing (information) from a federal official by oral affirmation, written statement or mere denial. The purpose of the statute is to "punish those who render positive false statements designed to pervert or undermine functions of governmental departments and agencies".

Overview

The statute spells out this purpose in subsection 18 U.S.C. § 1001(a), which states:

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully—

(1) falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device[ , ] a material fact;
(2) makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or
(3) makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry

shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 5 years or, …

Even constitutionally explicit Fifth Amendment privileges do not exonerate affirmative false statements.
References:
Falsification of Security Clearance Applications
Making false statements - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
United States Code: Title 18,1001. Statements or entries generally | LII / Legal Information Institute


Rich
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