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Old 10-12-2012, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,220 posts, read 18,917,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
I think that CW is no longer required as a base-level skill in obtaining a HAM radio license these days. Seems they don't see any possible use for it.
Code is no longer required to obtain an amateur radio license.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Georgia
1 posts, read 2,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellhead View Post
Right now I don't know any current CTR's or Signal intercept operators, but I am pretty sure they have to still learn Morse Code. It's the basis for their job in a lot of ways.
CTR Huh?.... I was one of those also. Used to tune in to KKN50. ....i....e.....KUCLUB
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Old 02-15-2013, 02:21 PM
 
Location: El Dorado County near Placerville
3 posts, read 4,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewisfkasnicker View Post
CTR Huh?.... I was one of those also. Used to tune in to KKN50. ....i....e.....KUCLUB





All very interesting; in fact, I was just thinking about this exact topic recently and was under the impression that, with the advances in satellite and other hi-tech means of communications, the need and/or use of Morse code in the military and especially the Navy, has been extremely marginalized or put to bed for general non-emergency use, in ship to ship and ship to shore communications.

I, too, am proud to have been a USN CT-R brancher, wherein after several months of Class ‘A’ School training at USNCTC, Corry Field, Pensacola, FL, Class 02A-68(R), I was assigned to the US Naval Security Group Activity station, at Galeta Island, Panama, CZ.

I do remember that, upon graduation at Pensacola, most of us were ‘copying’ on a typewriter, upwards to 100+ groups per minute vs. WPM; wherein, a ‘group’ was a grouping of five (coded) alpha and/or numeric characters in Morse, which would then be deciphered by other personnel.

We were never tested in WPM, always GPM. In this regard, it is amazing how the brain and ear can be trained to perceive code at such a fast speed, wherein it sounds like a continuous harmonic tone to the untrained ear; vs. the series of dots and dashes, most are accustomed to hearing for basic radio training or in an old movie.

While in my first week or two of ‘A’ School, the USS Pueblo AGER-2, was captured by the North Koreans, on January 23, 1968.

I remember the instructors speaking to the fact that some of the CT’s on board had been recent graduates of that training facility.

Then, while, still at Galeta Island, a United States Navy Lockheed EC-121M Warning Star, was shot down on April 15, 1969, by a North Korean MiG, with the loss of the entire crew, including all the CT’s. The aircraft was on a routine patrol and well out over International Waters/Airspace. (Not many folks remember this incident.)

I thoroughly enjoyed my service with the US Navy and my role as a CT-R branch operator; wherein I felt so blessed to be stationed in the Canal Zone, during the height of the Viet Nam war. I have many memories from the months at Corry Field, and also at Coco Solo, in the Canal Zone.

Last edited by NorCal-09; 02-15-2013 at 02:30 PM..
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Old 02-15-2013, 03:44 PM
 
4,615 posts, read 5,142,068 times
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I am not even sure they teach map reading and orienteering as common military skills anymore.

Was trying out a convoy trainer the other day and just got back from the abrams, and they do GPS now.

drives me crazy. train to drive on a road, turn left or right, etc. but no map, compass training. etc

Now I could be wrong and I hope these are common skills taught maybe in basic training or something but with all the new technology am not so sure.
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Old 05-07-2013, 02:41 PM
 
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Although the numbers keep getting smaller, Morse code is still taught in the military. I teach about 30 students a year in Morse, and the Navy still teaches it for ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communications. Some of our Special Ops guys still use it, as it is the only thing pretty much guaranteed to get through when all else fails. I've enjoyed over 35 years working in and with the US Army using this cutting edge of Civil War technology.
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Old 05-07-2013, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,417 posts, read 3,866,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post
I am not even sure they teach map reading and orienteering as common military skills anymore.

Was trying out a convoy trainer the other day and just got back from the abrams, and they do GPS now.

drives me crazy. train to drive on a road, turn left or right, etc. but no map, compass training. etc

Now I could be wrong and I hope these are common skills taught maybe in basic training or something but with all the new technology am not so sure.
Land navigation (map and compass, manually, on foot) are absolutely taught, drilled, and tested in the Army, TODAY, as a Skill Level I task.

Last edited by GeorgiaTransplant; 05-07-2013 at 03:31 PM..
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Old 05-07-2013, 03:38 PM
 
4,615 posts, read 5,142,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
Land navigation (map and compass, manually, on foot) are absolutely taught, drilled, and tested in the Army, TODAY, as a Skill Level I task.
No, i did not speculate on whether it was taught or not. I said I was not sure. I said that I had just been out on trainer devices, including convoy trainers, and it is not used at all or included in the training.

If land nav is still done as a common skill task - wonderful. It is a necessary skill IMO. If Morse Code is still done as a common skill task - wonderful. It appears that Morse is trained to small groups and thankfully if those who need it have the skill it can save lives and missions.
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Old 05-07-2013, 03:39 PM
 
4,615 posts, read 5,142,068 times
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I am so sorry GeorgiaT, someone posted that I speculated and it wasn't you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post
No, i did not speculate on whether it was taught or not. I said I was not sure. I said that I had just been out on trainer devices, including convoy trainers, and it is not used at all or included in the training.

If land nav is still done as a common skill task - wonderful. It is a necessary skill IMO. If Morse Code is still done as a common skill task - wonderful. It appears that Morse is trained to small groups and thankfully if those who need it have the skill it can save lives and missions.
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Old 05-07-2013, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,417 posts, read 3,866,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post
I am so sorry GeorgiaT, someone posted that I speculated and it wasn't you.
No, it was me. Then I reread your message and realized I'd been a little overboard-so I edited it down. Bottom line: it's taught. The theory is if GPS goes down, we still have the hands-on skills.
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Old 05-07-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
22,865 posts, read 34,658,239 times
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VOR aircraft navigation systems still transmit their station ID in Morse Code as well as voice for civilian aircraft at over 3,000 locations. The Morse Code ID is easier to identify than the voice from greater distances. But then I have bad hearing. I don't know if the military still uses VOR.
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