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Old 05-06-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Long Island,New York
8,163 posts, read 12,815,258 times
Reputation: 2474

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
My last USAF job was Element Chief of Mountain Home AFB's Transient Alert. Yes, we had a tough time with our Navy/Marine aircrew who mostly operate from carrier decks and have no need for red lines...
I was a security specialist at Whiteman AFB in the early 90's as a (missile cop) so most of the areas we guarded were fenced in with barbed wire at the top so rarely did we have to challenge anyone. When I worked the flightline for the Blue Angels show it was quite different. It was a 2 day event. They showed up very early. They were arrogant and gave me a hard time. When the first one approached the aircraft, I challenged him. He refused to stop and I quickly introduced him to the pavement. The others got a little pissed at me but I radioed in for assistance. My commander chewed them all a new one before removing them from the area. I guess I won that one.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
3,823 posts, read 13,133,630 times
Reputation: 1895
I was in the Air Force 1972-1998. I started out as a Communications Analyst (20230) and my first tour was in Okinawa. After that, due to an overseas in-balance (more positions overseas than in the US) I was put into the Fuels Specialist (631XX) field and sent to Dyess AFB, TX. Going from Intel to working on flight line was definitely different, but I enjoyed the change of pace. As soon as I made SSgt, under 3 1/2 years, they sent me back to Okinawa as an Analyst again. Now, I was behind the people in my career field and had to catch up quickly. Most of my tours were overseas, but I liked them and the jobs, except it was usually inside closed buildings and cold due to A/C on to keep equipment cooled. Finished out my last 8 years in San Antonio working up my way to Superintendent (1N490) before retiring. The politics usually increased with rank.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Earth
4,227 posts, read 20,280,133 times
Reputation: 2209
I see there's some responses here. I guess I should have went into detail.

My AFSC is 2A6X2 Aerospace ground Equipment. In a nut shell, it's maintaining the portable ground units that the aircraft maintainers use to upkeep the aircraft.

Like anything else it has it's pros and cons, but I'd be willing to say the cons outweigh the pros.

The pros are you get to work no a wide variety of units, and you get to deal with hydraulics, diesel mechanics, electronics, pneumatics, etc.

The cons...and I'll just rattle off a few...are the equipment is old, built cheap, always breaks (be it due to old age or stupid aircraft maintainers who aren't intelligent enough to operate it w/o breaking it) and you can't get new units until it hits a certain age (usually around 25 years)...some of the equipment is even older than that/is so old you can't even get parts for anymore...then you have instances where the paint is peeling off and management makes a big stink about corrosion on units, but at the same time you aren't supposed to apply a corrosion treatment, but instead you're supposed to paint it...only problems are we are not authorized to spot paint our own units, and we have to farm out the paint jobs to a shop who is already backed up painting aircraft parts and our stuff...except when their paint booth ventilation system breaks, it limits how big of units they can work...then you have a bunch of 3 levels who you have to take time out of the day to train while trying to ensure their following tech data, doing the job right, looking in the MSDS before they use chemicals...oh and the stifling hot hangar you get to work out of that doesn't even have adequate ventilation, not even any fans to keep the bay cool in the summer...and I won't even go into the detail of the delivery drivers who could be on his 5 minute lunch break but is being asked by the aircraft expediter to move a unit 1 spot down while he has 10 airmen standing around doing nothing...there's plenty more I could throw down, but I think you can see the point.

Now you probably think I'm sniveling but after 13 years of this it really gets to you. I really enjoy serving in the AF don't get me wrong, just I need a change. That's why I was kind of wanting to see what other AFSC's had to offer or if it's the same crap among the AFSC's.
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Old 05-08-2012, 04:44 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 19,120,969 times
Reputation: 6171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
Now you probably think I'm sniveling but after 13 years of this it really gets to you. I really enjoy serving in the AF don't get me wrong, just I need a change. That's why I was kind of wanting to see what other AFSC's had to offer or if it's the same crap among the AFSC's.
if it helps any, you WILL have a job waiting when you get out. Your skill set is transferable to many civilian jobs in the aircraft and general machine service area.
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Old 05-12-2012, 11:44 AM
 
763 posts, read 1,070,413 times
Reputation: 709
Whether the person b****es and moan about their AF job, or not, depends on the individual's behavior. My husband hates his job on Flightline, and even hated his job as a jet mechanic, but there are a handful of guys he works with who like their jobs (or just don't complain about it as much). My husband just doesn't see the positive on top of the little negative of him being in the military, because he despises the way the military treats him too much. Otherwise, his job is outside 80% of the time, even when it's 120 degrees out here in AZ summers, and in their thick AbU wear. As the mechanic, however, he did work indoors lots of times, but their cooling was from swamp coolers, which even in 120 degrees weather was still miserable. So, I'd say, it depends on what job you do specifically and where you are located to work, to how well you might actually like your position.
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Old 05-12-2012, 02:40 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 18,878,100 times
Reputation: 9894
Deez Nutttz, I've found that maintainer training on AGE equipment varies WIDELY from base to base and trainer to trainer. Sometimes we got pretty good training on units and sometimes it was a "quickie" once-through. (Are you kidding me; manually push a -60 when there's AGE drivers available???)
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Old 05-12-2012, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Long Island,New York
8,163 posts, read 12,815,258 times
Reputation: 2474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deez Nuttz View Post
I see there's some responses here. I guess I should have went into detail.

My AFSC is 2A6X2 Aerospace ground Equipment. In a nut shell, it's maintaining the portable ground units that the aircraft maintainers use to upkeep the aircraft.

Like anything else it has it's pros and cons, but I'd be willing to say the cons outweigh the pros.

The pros are you get to work no a wide variety of units, and you get to deal with hydraulics, diesel mechanics, electronics, pneumatics, etc.

The cons...and I'll just rattle off a few...are the equipment is old, built cheap, always breaks (be it due to old age or stupid aircraft maintainers who aren't intelligent enough to operate it w/o breaking it) and you can't get new units until it hits a certain age (usually around 25 years)...some of the equipment is even older than that/is so old you can't even get parts for anymore...then you have instances where the paint is peeling off and management makes a big stink about corrosion on units, but at the same time you aren't supposed to apply a corrosion treatment, but instead you're supposed to paint it...only problems are we are not authorized to spot paint our own units, and we have to farm out the paint jobs to a shop who is already backed up painting aircraft parts and our stuff...except when their paint booth ventilation system breaks, it limits how big of units they can work...then you have a bunch of 3 levels who you have to take time out of the day to train while trying to ensure their following tech data, doing the job right, looking in the MSDS before they use chemicals...oh and the stifling hot hangar you get to work out of that doesn't even have adequate ventilation, not even any fans to keep the bay cool in the summer...and I won't even go into the detail of the delivery drivers who could be on his 5 minute lunch break but is being asked by the aircraft expediter to move a unit 1 spot down while he has 10 airmen standing around doing nothing...there's plenty more I could throw down, but I think you can see the point.

Now you probably think I'm sniveling but after 13 years of this it really gets to you. I really enjoy serving in the AF don't get me wrong, just I need a change. That's why I was kind of wanting to see what other AFSC's had to offer or if it's the same crap among the AFSC's.
Alot of people I know have cross trained to other careers. Quite a few chose medical fields and have been very happy. The one thing I would take into consideration is what might help you as an outside career? X-Ray Technician is popular and a good stepping stone for a few that I knew. Good luck.
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: In The Pacific
986 posts, read 1,133,668 times
Reputation: 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post
Deez Nutttz, I've found that maintainer training on AGE equipment varies WIDELY from base to base and trainer to trainer. Sometimes we got pretty good training on units and sometimes it was a "quickie" once-through. (Are you kidding me; manually push a -60 when there's AGE drivers available???)
Yeah, I remember those -60 units! I even knew people who got ran over by one!
I knew a few AGE maintainers back in the days I was a young airman overseas stationed at Clark AB, Philippines, pretty warm place to work and pretty humid and wet during the monsoon season! I'm glad I don't work on airplanes anymore ever since I retired!
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Old 05-21-2012, 12:30 PM
 
22 posts, read 80,270 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbub22 View Post
I entered the AF as a Security Specialist (SS). My first assignment was exclusively Law Enforcement base, skate duty. My next assignment was brutal, a northern tier base, where I worked SS in an WSA. This is a very high stress environment demanding attention to detail. After a 1 year and some change of SS in the WSA, I laterally cross trained to Law Enforcement (LE). My next years as LE were fun, but I was still working near and around WSA. The career field is very tough on its people. A common phrase heard is that "we eat our own." Very true because I worried more about my leadership and than the outside functionals. Later, I cross trained out of the cop career field after 13 years into a more "respected" career field. Respected because no one, even our own leadership, liked us. Cross training was my best decision, because I am retired now and actually working in that current career field. I loved my years as LE & SS, because I learned that if I can make it there I can make it anywhere.
Care to share which base you were at for the fun in the WSA? I'm currently at Malmstrom working in building you guys were protecting. It's fun to talk to the retired guys and here stories of the W from back in the day.
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:17 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 3,129,961 times
Reputation: 891
I enlisted when I was 17 and did four years as Security Police (3P0) and I liked it. My first duty assignment was the 12th Missile Squadron at Malmstrom AFB in Montana doing missile field security, but I was only there for 10 months before I got orders to Germany. When you take account my 30 days leave before reporting to my overseas post, I was in Montana for exactly 11 months.

The remainder of my enlistment was spent at Allied Force Command in Heidelberg, Germany, a NATO assignment, and I worked with Army MPs and we deployed...A LOT. But we were like family. It was great times with a great bunch of guys. I'm glad I chose Security Police as my career field. I have a "typical desk job" now as a civilian, but I don't think I would have enjoyed being a desk jockey in the USAF. And I liked Germany so much, that I find myself back in Germany working for a great agency.
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