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Old 03-15-2013, 09:09 PM
 
30 posts, read 109,565 times
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^ Thanks Rich. I saw the NY Times article too on Mildred Manning but didn't know how to put it on this thread nicely edited and with a picture. Her story is pretty amazing. I've read a few military nurse memories but reading her obit has inspired me to read more. There's quite a few Army nurse memoirs.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
22,312 posts, read 33,180,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clearer_skies_13 View Post
^ Thanks Rich. I saw the NY Times article too on Mildred Manning but didn't know how to put it on this thread nicely edited and with a picture. Her story is pretty amazing. I've read a few military nurse memories but reading her obit has inspired me to read more. There's quite a few Army nurse memoirs.
My pleasure. A photo from "U.S. Army Center of Military History", "US Army nurses from Bataan and Corregidor, freed after
3 years imprisonment in Santo Tomas Internment Compound climb into trucks as they Leave Manila, Luzon, P.I."



More photos and descriptions on this page: Captured Army Nurses - The Philippines - World War II This public website, "CMH Online",
is provided as a public service by the U.S. Army Center of Military History and contains information cleared for public release.
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
2,031 posts, read 1,578,029 times
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xxxxxxxx

Quote:
After leaping from a plane over northern France in June 1944, Bill Coleman spent almost a year as a prisoner of war during World War II.

He went without food or water for days. In 1945, he and other prisoners were forced to collect the charred bodies after the Allies firebombed Dresden. Coleman told the Sentinel in 2009 that he didn't expect to survive the war.

'We were sure we would be executed," the U.S. Army veteran said.

Those "traumatic experiences" stayed with Coleman, said his wife, Toni, shaping his passion for veterans' care later in life. Coleman was a vocal advocate for the new Orlando VA Medical Center taking shape at Lake Nona and expected to open 2013.

"He made this [the VA hospital] his priority," said U.S. Rep. John Mica, who knew Coleman for 40 years.

Coleman of Orlando died Thursday of complications from pulmonary fibrosis. He was 87.

A recipient of two Bronze Stars and a Purple Heart, Coleman returned to Orlando after World War II and began a career in public service.

He was a Republican state legislator in the late 1950s, Florida's first secretary of transportation and a member of the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority. He also ran for Congress and Orange County clerk of court.

In 1989, then-President George H.W. Bush appointed Coleman commissioner of the Public Building Service, an agency that oversees the work space for more than 1 million government employees.

"He was a political animal," said his son Kevin Coleman.

Born in Tennessee, Coleman spent time in Orlando as a boy, often visiting his grandparents who lived near the Lancaster Park neighborhood. The day he graduated from military school, Coleman enlisted in the U.S. Army and trained at Fort Benning in Georgia. He was a member of the 101st Airborne Division.

Fifty years after he made his first jump over Normandy, Coleman did it again in 1994, joining 40 veterans who parachuted into France as a way to commemorate the invasion. He jumped out of a plane again at age 80 on the 60th anniversary of D-Day.

Five years later, Coleman returned to France and received that nation's highest military award, the medal of the Legion of Honor.

Meanwhile back home, Coleman dedicated much of his time to veterans. He was a member of the Central Florida Veterans Memorial Park Foundation and sat on the Florida Commission of Veterans Affairs.

As a former POW and survivor of World War II, Coleman understood the need for proper medical care both physical and mental for returning veterans. The Orlando VA Medical Center will be his lasting legacy, his son said.
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Old 06-22-2013, 07:49 PM
 
Location: USA
3,966 posts, read 8,452,768 times
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Until I can find information about my dead grandfathers, I am going to find random vets who have passed and post them up here. Someone needs to always be remembered, many wars didn't fight themselves you know. I don't understand why the French people respect our soldiers more than this country does.



Quote:
Originally Posted by — Associated Press
Army Sgt. Benjamin W. Biskie
Died December 24, 2003 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom
27, of Vermilion, Ohio; assigned to the 5th Engineer Battalion, 1st Engineer Brigade, based in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., killed in action while in a vehicle that was struck by an improvised explosive device, on Dec. 24 near Samarra, Iraq.
Sgt. Benjamin Biskie was known for his philosophy on life: Lighten up.

“He liked doing anything that made life a little bit less serious,” said his sister, Andrea Brown of Tucson, Ariz. “He was the type of person that, if you met him for five minutes, you knew that you would never forget him.

Biskie, 27, died along with two other soldiers while traveling near the Iraqi town of Samarra on Dec. 24. Biskie joined the Army nine years ago, after graduating from high school, and was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Survivors include his wife, Marcie, and 6-year-old son, Benjamin Jr.

“He loved his family and friends and serving in the United States Army,” his wife said. “He was proud of his country, and he fully believed in his mission in Iraq.”
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: USA
3,966 posts, read 8,452,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fallen Warrior Site
Army Spc. Hilda I. Clayton
Died July 2, 2013 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom
22, of Augusta, Ga.; assigned to 55th Signal Company (Combat Camera), 21st Signal Brigade, Fort Meade, Md.; died July 2 in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, of injuries that occurred in a noncombat incident in Qaraghahi, Afghanistan.

Last edited by shiphead; 08-05-2013 at 10:42 AM..
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Old 08-06-2013, 11:30 AM
 
4,456 posts, read 2,979,554 times
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This post revolves around the veterans and specifcially those who died in WWI. It affected me deeply.

I read a letter in one of our papers a while back from a couple who visited the Meuse-Argonne American cemetery in the village of Romagne-sous-Montfaucon in France. The cemetery has the largest nuimber of American military dead in Europe. They noted that in contrast to Normandy where there were many people visiting graves, they didn't see anybody at the site in their 2 hour visit. They had the place to themselves and correspondingly among the dead. As they were walking looking at the graves they could just hear the birds singing in the trees. When they looked at the guest list, the last person came 2 months earlier. From that they figured the dead had no living friends or relatives to visit. Like the couple, I intend to go there one day soon to make the cemetery a place of pilgrimage and remember those who gave up their lives for our freedom as time has forgotten them. Thank you.
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Old 08-17-2013, 06:42 PM
 
Location: United States of America
1,735 posts, read 2,104,200 times
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Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

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Old 11-29-2013, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
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This man was British, not American, but I thought the story was neat and he was an ally during a very important time in our country's history.


A Veteran Died With Nobody To Attend His Funeral — What Happened Next Was Incredibly Moving


Quote:
Harold Jellicoe Percival, a veteran of Bomber Command in WWII, died last month aged 99. The death notice in his local paper said that there was nobody to attend his funeral.
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Old 11-29-2013, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
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.......

Quote:

INDIANAPOLIS -The Honor Flight program flies World War II veterans to Washington, DC to see the memorial dedicated to them before they die. The importance of that mission was underscored again Sunday.

World War II veteran, 92-year-old Warren Perney, died last week, just days after he took part in an Honor Flight.

It is hard to find a way to say 'thank you' to the world's greatest generation. The Indianapolis Honor Flight may be as good a way as any.

"I saw the real thing, but I haven't seen the memorial and I would like to," Perney said during a live interview on WTHR Sunrise before he boarded his Honor Flight one week ago.

As I sat with his widow, Jean, this Sunday, I said "...and the timing of it." She responded. "The timing was amazing. Amazing."

It truly was - because he died five days later.

"That was something he wanted to do, and he did it," she said. "Very important." When asked in what way - closure? Jean responded, "Yes it was, right."

A devout Christian, Warren Perney was a conscientious objector during WWII. So he was assigned to the only place where he could save lives instead of take them. So there he was, serving as a medic, on Omaha Beach.

Many of the men he served alongside all those years ago were at his side Sunday at Feeney Hornak Funeral Home. Men like 91-year-old Don Blair.

"The first day on Omaha Beach, I think, was the worst because the big push was on," Blair said.

And 91-year-old Jouett Faulkner added, "What made you feel bad, you'd be working on a man here and there would be four or five hollering 'medic' and you couldn't get to them."

"I know one thing for sure," said 98-year-old Marshall Horn, "there were no atheists there. There was a lot of praying done."

Warren's son, Dave, walked us up to a small cluster of medals on the table next to his dad's casket.

"These are the medals dad had in his drawer," he said.

The medals he never told his son about until his later years, including the Bronze Star he earned for saving a life on Omaha Beach on D-Day.

The Bronze Star was on display Sunday at his viewing, along with the Sagamore of the Wabash he received from Governor Evan Bayh in 1990 for starting the Indianapolis Chapter of Habitat for Humanity.

Perney's daughter, Diane Perney, told me her dad was "very humble." She was "proud to call him dad."

Son Dave observed, "He was wired to serve."

After 65 years of marriage, two children and four grandchildren, he had only one mission left in this life. To board that Honor Flight.

Johnny Cimasko, who works with the Indianapolis Honor Flight heard, heard Jean say what that flight meant to him. In fact, she said he was talking to her about it the night before he died.

"It means the world to me that Mr. Perney got to go to Washington with us five days before he passed away, to see the memorial that he earned. He earned it, along with his comrades," Cimasko summarized.

And fortunately, Warren Perney lived to see it.

The funeral for Warren Perney will be <Monday at 1 p.m. at Feeney-Hornak Keystone Mortuary of Indianapolis.
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Old 01-21-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Idaho
836 posts, read 1,123,923 times
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Master Sergeant Edward Paul Lotze

I didn't know this gentleman but stopped by and took photos for a friend.



More photos here:

http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/e...e/DSC00924.jpg
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