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Old 08-21-2017, 06:41 AM
 
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My aunts husband passed on yesterday. He was a Vietnam veteran.He talked very little of his experiences there,which I am sure is in part because of some of the hell he experienced. Salute Richard, you will be missed.
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Old 01-01-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
5,698 posts, read 3,692,674 times
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My father passed away Dec 22, at the age of 93. He never wanted to talk about his military service, only saying he was just a clerk typist. He did spend two years in the Pacific, according to his discharge paperwork, receiving several unit awards, including 3 Bronze Stars. The paperwork does not say what they were for.

I came home from the funeral service with his burial flag, and started researching display cases for it. Some included a space for medals. My sister says she has never seen any medals, so I guess I can assume he never asked for them. Before I order a case, I would like to find out what his medals were for, and if I can get medals for the display case.

Having enlisted in the Air Force during Viet Nam, I felt for a long time, that I didn't really do that much, and maybe, if he were "just a clerk typist" he might have felt the same way. However, I believe that every job in a combat area is critical to get the job done, and even if he was in a local HQ billet, it probably wasn't his choice, and he was doing the job they gave him which supported those who were in direct combat. Therefore I feel he earned any unit citations he was qualified to have.

Is there a place I can write or email, to acquire the details of his awards, and or get a copy of his medals?

Thanks for any help.
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Old 01-01-2018, 10:15 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,928 posts, read 38,388,662 times
Reputation: 27900
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post

Is there a place I can write or email, to acquire the details of his awards, and or get a copy of his medals?

Thanks for any help.
Sorry for your father's passing...

Check out this page:

"Veterans or next-of-kin of deceased veterans can use the online order form at vetrecs.archives.gov (or use the SF-180). Archival requests may also be processed online (or via the SF-180).

Obtain and Fill out Standard Form 180 (SF-180)
Or Write a Letter to Request Records"

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/mi...ndard-form-180
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Old 01-01-2018, 12:00 PM
 
4,000 posts, read 1,789,933 times
Reputation: 3194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
My father passed away Dec 22, at the age of 93. He never wanted to talk about his military service, only saying he was just a clerk typist. He did spend two years in the Pacific, according to his discharge paperwork, receiving several unit awards, including 3 Bronze Stars. The paperwork does not say what they were for.

I came home from the funeral service with his burial flag, and started researching display cases for it. Some included a space for medals. My sister says she has never seen any medals, so I guess I can assume he never asked for them. Before I order a case, I would like to find out what his medals were for, and if I can get medals for the display case.

Having enlisted in the Air Force during Viet Nam, I felt for a long time, that I didn't really do that much, and maybe, if he were "just a clerk typist" he might have felt the same way. However, I believe that every job in a combat area is critical to get the job done, and even if he was in a local HQ billet, it probably wasn't his choice, and he was doing the job they gave him which supported those who were in direct combat. Therefore I feel he earned any unit citations he was qualified to have.

Is there a place I can write or email, to acquire the details of his awards, and or get a copy of his medals?

Thanks for any help.



Salute to your father. He served In a combat zone for two years. I am sure he deserved whatever medals he received.
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Old 01-02-2018, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,660 posts, read 4,407,254 times
Reputation: 5876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
My father passed away Dec 22, at the age of 93. He never wanted to talk about his military service, only saying he was just a clerk typist. He did spend two years in the Pacific, according to his discharge paperwork, receiving several unit awards, including 3 Bronze Stars. The paperwork does not say what they were for.

I came home from the funeral service with his burial flag, and started researching display cases for it. Some included a space for medals. My sister says she has never seen any medals, so I guess I can assume he never asked for them. Before I order a case, I would like to find out what his medals were for, and if I can get medals for the display case.

Having enlisted in the Air Force during Viet Nam, I felt for a long time, that I didn't really do that much, and maybe, if he were "just a clerk typist" he might have felt the same way. However, I believe that every job in a combat area is critical to get the job done, and even if he was in a local HQ billet, it probably wasn't his choice, and he was doing the job they gave him which supported those who were in direct combat. Therefore I feel he earned any unit citations he was qualified to have.

Is there a place I can write or email, to acquire the details of his awards, and or get a copy of his medals?

Thanks for any help.

Cruzincat your father was a hero. 3 Bronze stars are the primary indicator. The Bronze Star is an individual award not a unit award. That award is generally and almost always given for action in a combat zone. To have got 3 of them shows that he certainly did not just sit behind a typewriter typing reports.

That being said the form you should request from the link Poncho_NM posted is DA Form 638. This form is the narrative that nominated the award and will give at least something of the action that required the nomination.

Thank you for your father's service. It was his generation (assuming late WWII and Korea) that inspired me in my service. His generation and those veterans of both Korea and Vietnam showed what selfless sacrifice really meant.
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Old 01-02-2018, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
5,698 posts, read 3,692,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
Cruzincat your father was a hero. 3 Bronze stars are the primary indicator. The Bronze Star is an individual award not a unit award. That award is generally and almost always given for action in a combat zone. To have got 3 of them shows that he certainly did not just sit behind a typewriter typing reports.

That being said the form you should request from the link Poncho_NM posted is DA Form 638. This form is the narrative that nominated the award and will give at least something of the action that required the nomination.

Thank you for your father's service. It was his generation (assuming late WWII and Korea) that inspired me in my service. His generation and those veterans of both Korea and Vietnam showed what selfless sacrifice really meant.
Thank you for your comments. Wish me luck in getting the information. It may have all been lost in the 1973 fire, which resulted in the loss of 80% of the Army records on hand at the time. It will just take time to try, so I won't quit trying.

Cat

edit: This is a list of his awards from the discharge paperwork (not a DD214 as far as I can tell - it's white on a black background like an old photocopy).
ASIATIC-PACIFIC THEATER RIBBON W/2 BRONZE STARS
PHILLIPINE LIBERATION RIBBON W/1 BRONZE STAR
GOOD CONDUCT RIBBON
DISTINGUISHED UNIT BADGE
MERITORIOUS UNIT AWARD
WORLD WAR II VICTORY MEDAL

The copy my sister sent was blurry on quite a bit of it, so I cannot even figure out what unit he was in at this time. I am waiting for a better copy. As soon as she gets time away from playing Facebook games...

Last edited by Cruzincat; 01-02-2018 at 08:27 AM..
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
5,698 posts, read 3,692,674 times
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The form is: WD AGO 53-55

I searched that and found an explanation for the different boxes. The explanation for the box listing medals and awards included:
"There were 2 different Bronze Star Medals, one was for campaigns, and 1 for valor or distinguished service in action."

In the box listing "Battles or Campaigns", his listed New Guinea; Luzon.

So, it is possible that someone could get a Bronze Star for being part of a unit involved in a campaign. I won't know until I can get the information from Archives at this point.

Either way, in my opinion, anyone who went over there and managed to come back with a good conduct ribbon is a hero.
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Old 01-02-2018, 02:06 PM
 
17,593 posts, read 9,592,454 times
Reputation: 17027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
The form is: WD AGO 53-55

I searched that and found an explanation for the different boxes. The explanation for the box listing medals and awards included:
"There were 2 different Bronze Star Medals, one was for campaigns, and 1 for valor or distinguished service in action."

In the box listing "Battles or Campaigns", his listed New Guinea; Luzon.

So, it is possible that someone could get a Bronze Star for being part of a unit involved in a campaign. I won't know until I can get the information from Archives at this point.

Either way, in my opinion, anyone who went over there and managed to come back with a good conduct ribbon is a hero.
Anyone can be killed by enemy action in a combat zone. If his service was good enough for his chain of command to bother with an advanced award (which a Bronze Star is), then it should be considered good enough for anyone.
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:50 AM
 
88 posts, read 121,686 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
Thank you for your comments. Wish me luck in getting the information. It may have all been lost in the 1973 fire, which resulted in the loss of 80% of the Army records on hand at the time. It will just take time to try, so I won't quit trying.

Cat

edit: This is a list of his awards from the discharge paperwork (not a DD214 as far as I can tell - it's white on a black background like an old photocopy).
ASIATIC-PACIFIC THEATER RIBBON W/2 BRONZE STARS
PHILLIPINE LIBERATION RIBBON W/1 BRONZE STAR
GOOD CONDUCT RIBBON
DISTINGUISHED UNIT BADGE
MERITORIOUS UNIT AWARD
WORLD WAR II VICTORY MEDAL

The copy my sister sent was blurry on quite a bit of it, so I cannot even figure out what unit he was in at this time. I am waiting for a better copy. As soon as she gets time away from playing Facebook games...
Your father did not earn 3 Bronze Stars.
The Bronze stars indicate that he earned more than one of the same medal.
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Old 05-22-2018, 06:29 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,078 posts, read 3,325,783 times
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Rest in Peace Dearest Sir

A very beloved family member!

Feb 5, 1938 – May 17, 2018 (Age 80)

Colonel Taylor dedicated his life to serving God, his family, and as a decorated veteran and hero, served his country, which he loved so much, 33 years in the US Air Force. Colonel Taylor enlisted in the Air Force in San Antonio, in 1955, completing his Basic Training at Lackland Air Force Base.

Colonel Taylor then began his career as a pilot, upon completing flight school. Colonel Taylor served his country through two tours during the Vietnam War flying B-52 Bombers. He continued his career in significant leadership posts, commanding positions in Aviation, Military Intelligence, Training & Instruction, stationed at Castle AFB, Washington DC, Hickam AFB Hawaii, which most notably culminated to a distinguished position and honor; as a United Nations Joint Services Armistice Affairs, Political & Military Liaison Officer, at Yongsan Army Post, Seoul Korea. There he served as a liaison and negotiator on the DMZ, between South Korea and North Korea. Colonel Taylor, later returned to San Antonio to serve at Kelly AFB at the US Air Force distinguished Electronic Security Command.

Colonel Taylor retired from the Air Force in 1989, and later continued to serve his country by passing on his knowledge, expertise and passion for this country and freedom, by developing young people to carry the torch for this country. He dedicated his remaining years by beginning two High School ROTC programs in Bakersfield, CA and most recently at Oak Ridge HS in Houston, TX. He has touched numerous lives through is life lessons and mantra of "Duty, Honor, Country". He inspired, motivated and educated hundreds of young people to believe in themselves, achieve dreams through education and give back to this country he loved so much.
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