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Old 12-05-2012, 08:08 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
14,611 posts, read 6,715,959 times
Reputation: 6533

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Army_Guy View Post
...
And I don't think it was 6 weeks of training, most likely it was LDAC for 30 days done at Ft. Lewis up in Washington state.

The government doesn't give you something for nothing. If she accepts the commission, it's what we refer to as ADSO, Active Duty Service Obligation and people will do extra years of ADSO for various reasons such as choice of branch (MOS) or duty station.

If she doesn't accept the commission, I believe she will owe the government the cost of that education. I'm not exactly sure as I'm an OCS guy myself.

And I feel sorry for her if she has no intentions of ever doing Army stuff because the Army loves to send 2LT's to units that are soon to deploy.
My ADSC when I signed up for ROTC was for 4 years. (ADSC=ADSO, committment vice obligation). However, when I accepted the scholarship it had recently changed to 6 years. No matter, my ADSC after completing pilot training was 6 years as well from the date of graduation.

We had a couple "contract cadets", those of us on scholarship, who failed to maintain GPA in college, and one who screwed up big time at Field Training (the 30 days of training mentioned in earlier posts) by getting hammered during our one off-base Saturday and spending the night on the beach with a local girl (Vandenberg AFB). He was absent during the next day's open-ranks inspection, and was booted out. Not completely, he owed the USAF 4 years as enlisted, and entered as an E-1 Airman Basic. Contract cadets who failed to complete the program entered active duty as an enlisted member and owed for the education already paid for. Non-contract cadets could withdraw from ROTC with little if any obligation since the government had spent nothing on them.

There were two "summer camps", or Field Training courses. One for the 4-year course was between the sophomore and junior years in college and was 4 weeks long, and for those entering the Professional Officers' Course (POC) before their junior year it was six weeks long. It's all changed since 1980 when I went through, and is likely different for the Army and Navy.

During my 4 years as an ROTC cadet I was a Airman Basic. I was paid one month during Field Training, and again for the summer between my junior and senior year.
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Old 12-05-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,532,009 times
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I served with a sailor [Vince] who applied for an OCS program while we were both in A and C schools. We graduated together, as E4s. I went to the fleet, he went to Purdue.

We both made advancement to E5. He was only paid base-pay, while I got all of the other pays.

Vince was in a NROTC program, he wore uniforms on campus, drilled weekends, and his summers were spent as a 'cadet' touring various Naval vessels. I spent that enlistment making deployments.

Four years later, I caught up with Vince again in a shipyard. He had failed out from the program in his senior year. So the Navy booted him to the fleet, he was assigned to a boat in the same shipyard where my boat had gone into for overhaul. While going through overhaul he was able to re-do his senior year class assignments and exams. We finished our six year enlistments within weeks of each other. At that time he had gotten his B.S. from Purdue, and we both had the GI-Bill available for us to utilize.
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Old 12-05-2012, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
499 posts, read 1,806,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SluggoF16 View Post
My ADSC when I signed up for ROTC was for 4 years. (ADSC=ADSO, committment vice obligation). However, when I accepted the scholarship it had recently changed to 6 years. No matter, my ADSC after completing pilot training was 6 years as well from the date of graduation.
Sluggo-

Perhaps the USAF is different but in the Army, our obligation is for 8 years--- it's been that way for as long as I have been in the Army (1988). It's always a combination of active service and reserve service. The same holds true for reservists-- active reserve and inactive reserve. We can also incur ADSOs for additional reasons: specialty training, schooling, etc. However, they can run concurrently.
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Old 12-05-2012, 04:30 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,152 posts, read 38,928,795 times
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DoD Instruction Number 1304.25 August 25, 1997
http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/c...df/130425p.pdf

Quote:
4. POLICY

It is DoD policy under 10 U.S.C. (reference (b)) that:

4.1. Every person, on initial entry into a Military Service, shall serve a total of 8 years, to be fulfilled, in accordance with this Instruction.

4.2. The MSO for any person whose initial entry into a Military Service is on or after June 1, 1984, shall be for a period of 8 years from the date of enlistment, appointment, or, when authorized by law, induction.
and before that it was a 6 year obligation, at least to the 1960's that I remember. When you got out of your "active duty time" you would go into the inactive reserves (or active reserves) if you still had a remaining Military Service Obligation (MSO)

Rich
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Old 12-05-2012, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,194 posts, read 4,243,159 times
Reputation: 9436
Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
My Sister in Law and Husband are currently contemplating joining the Military- but my MIL only wants my Sister in Law to join if she can go to school Full Time while on Active Duty (which as DH and I say, is very do-able but we haven't heard of the above situation before).
Which do they want?

I think I see what they want, they want the benefits but not the commitment and sacrifice. They want to be "active duty" but go to school full time so they don't have to train, report and go to war.

If they can't fathom that joining the military means you sign a blank check payable up to your life, then they need to stay away.

Sorry if I sound rude but I'm a Army Officer and we definitely do not need more people who join for the benefits but really don't want to be here.
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:12 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
14,611 posts, read 6,715,959 times
Reputation: 6533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army_Guy View Post
...If they can't fathom that joining the military means you sign a blank check payable up to your life, then they need to stay away.

Sorry if I sound rude but I'm a Army Officer and we definitely do not need more people who join for the benefits but really don't want to be here.
Absolutely agree. I was fortunate that I never personally commanded anyone who signed up and then did everything they could to avoid service, but I HAVE been associated with several personnel, enlisted AND officers, whose motives had less to do with service before self and more to do with self before, well, everything.

In 1990 there were several incidents of active and reserve component personnel doing anything possible to get out of deployment to Desert Shield/Storm. Whether intentionally getting pregnant, drug/DUI, or insubordination, anything to get out of it. A couple of ANG pilots who were airline captains even resigned their commissions because they would lose a lot of money while deployed (and subsequently not make their three alimony payments AND the payments to their homes, cars, etc).

While this is somewhat off-topic, it reiterates the fact that when you join the military, it is TO SERVE. The US Constitution, the people, and each other, but not one's self. Anyone else need not apply.
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,194 posts, read 4,243,159 times
Reputation: 9436
Sluggo,

Those things are still happening today. Before we left, our CDR told us that if you get a DUI, you're still deploying but you'll be busted in rank downrange and after we get back, that's when he'll attempt to chapter you.

The military is not a place to pad your resume!
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Old 05-21-2014, 09:30 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,771 times
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YES OF COURSE THIS IS TRUE Called "BOOST / NAPS" look it up yourself. There was a program out there for minority's, females and low income whites. To get into the officer ranks across all branches, they signed an enlisted contract went to basic training, then to OCS then college, the program was called boost.
The reason you go to basic training is because you are enlisted until you finish school/college, and yes you get paid active duty pay while in school full time, you only report once a years and go to school full time. If you fail out of school or get into trouble you then are automatically obligated to fulfill your enlisted contract.
I did 22 years in the US Navy, I encounter many people in this program started back in the late 80"s early 90"s.
I have know idea if the program is still around.
And just because someone does a few years and in armed forces and don't know about the program doesn't mean anything. Programs come and go as they ranks swell and deplete.
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Old 05-22-2014, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,633 posts, read 4,399,964 times
Reputation: 4214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief jay View Post
YES OF COURSE THIS IS TRUE Called "BOOST / NAPS" look it up yourself. There was a program out there for minority's, females and low income whites. To get into the officer ranks across all branches, they signed an enlisted contract went to basic training, then to OCS then college, the program was called boost.
The reason you go to basic training is because you are enlisted until you finish school/college, and yes you get paid active duty pay while in school full time, you only report once a years and go to school full time. If you fail out of school or get into trouble you then are automatically obligated to fulfill your enlisted contract.
I did 22 years in the US Navy, I encounter many people in this program started back in the late 80"s early 90"s.
I have know idea if the program is still around.
And just because someone does a few years and in armed forces and don't know about the program doesn't mean anything. Programs come and go as they ranks swell and deplete.

Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic
My MIL's neighbor claims that when her daughter went Active Duty in the Army
There is no such program in the Army. There has not been such a program in the Army since at least the mid-1980s.
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Old 05-22-2014, 09:14 AM
 
9,360 posts, read 15,818,519 times
Reputation: 17166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief jay View Post
YES OF COURSE THIS IS TRUE Called "BOOST / NAPS" look it up yourself. There was a program out there for minority's, females and low income whites. To get into the officer ranks across all branches, they signed an enlisted contract went to basic training, then to OCS then college, the program was called boost.
The reason you go to basic training is because you are enlisted until you finish school/college, and yes you get paid active duty pay while in school full time, you only report once a years and go to school full time. If you fail out of school or get into trouble you then are automatically obligated to fulfill your enlisted contract.
I did 22 years in the US Navy, I encounter many people in this program started back in the late 80"s early 90"s.
I have know idea if the program is still around.
And just because someone does a few years and in armed forces and don't know about the program doesn't mean anything. Programs come and go as they ranks swell and deplete.
The BOOST program is no longer around. My understanding is that BOOST allowed people to attend NROTC as civilians on scholarship with a stipend-- not as active duty enlisted -- or allowed them to apply to the USNA. Sailors who were already on active duty and selected for college were on active duty and were paid. Nursing candidates were paid as E-3s while in nursing school and earning their BSN for a direct commission. I am not aware of the army ever having such a program.

Last edited by joe from dayton; 05-22-2014 at 09:33 AM..
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