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Old 04-21-2013, 03:14 AM
 
1,613 posts, read 1,001,926 times
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A friend of mine was turned down by the Navy because he suffered an asthma attack at the age of 14. He volunteered the information that he had childhood asthma. He did well on the ASVAB test however.

I am told that he made a mistake admitting this asthma problem, because his medical records wouldn't have been checked if he had stayed quiet about asthma. Is this true? His recruiter told him to try another branch. Anybody have any suggestions about what he should tell them or not tell them about asthma? Should he just stay quiet about having tried to enlist already? What about the fact that his ASVAB score is on file.

Thanks.
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Old 04-21-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
499 posts, read 1,537,806 times
Reputation: 997
Was he diagnosed with asthma? If he was, he needs to disclose it. If he wasn't, he doesn't need to disclose it because there's no official diagnosis. The reason I ask if he was diagnosed by a doctor is because it's not uncommon for someone to say, "I had "x" when I was a kid", because mom or dad told them they did. Asthma is one of those conditions. A parent bought an OTC inhaler, etc., because their child has "asthma".

Bottom line-- there's a very valid reason his medical information needs to be 100% accurate. If he doesn't medically qualify, then he doesn't medically qualify. Lying about it is illegal but more importantly, can prove to be dangerous. Medical waivers and what is allowed do change and very by service. When I was in a recruiting battalion (US Army), not every asthma waiver was denied. But with recruiting going well and add the fact that even the Army is downsizing, they may not approve any of those medical waivers today.
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Old 04-21-2013, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Where I'm At
582 posts, read 769,780 times
Reputation: 1362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Led Zeppelin View Post
A friend of mine was turned down by the Navy because he suffered an asthma attack at the age of 14. He volunteered the information that he had childhood asthma. He did well on the ASVAB test however.

I am told that he made a mistake admitting this asthma problem, because his medical records wouldn't have been checked if he had stayed quiet about asthma. Is this true? His recruiter told him to try another branch. Anybody have any suggestions about what he should tell them or not tell them about asthma? Should he just stay quiet about having tried to enlist already? What about the fact that his ASVAB score is on file.

Thanks.
Was he disqualified at MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Station) or was he disqualified before he went to MEPS (in the recruiter's office)?
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Old 04-25-2013, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,197 posts, read 6,522,110 times
Reputation: 5348
If he's been to MEPS already and was disqualified he isn't going to be able to hide anything as he has a computer record in MIRS. As has been said already...if he wasn't diagnosed with it then he should not say he had it. Grandma stating you had asthma when you were little but you never seen a doctor for it doesn't mean you had asthma.
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Old 04-27-2013, 03:40 AM
 
3,885 posts, read 3,595,081 times
Reputation: 1989
If he can't get into the Navy, check out the Military Sealift Command. They do all the logistics for the Navy, have a variety of jobs, and pay 3 times what the Navy pays, treated much better and you get a lot of overtime.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: KC, MO
699 posts, read 515,128 times
Reputation: 579
Default He's a Weak Link in an Army that Moves as a Group

Quote:
Originally Posted by Led Zeppelin View Post
A friend of mine was turned down by the Navy because he suffered an asthma attack at the age of 14.

Should he just stay quiet about having tried to enlist already? What about the fact that his ASVAB score is on file.

Thanks.
Hello,

Sorry to sound unsympathetic but this person, assuming he was in combat, would be a threat to the integrity of any unit to which he is assigned.

We don't need a (could have been avoided) incident where a gun bunny or grunt is not able to provide suppressive fire during an ambush.

Also, were he in the jungle/bush while having an attack, his medic would be calling up a dustoff/medevac to come get him. An Air Ambulance being tied up to retrieve some wing nut with a serious/debilitating health problem is a NO-GO.

Suggest to him he join his State Militia where the odds of his being called up are nil (but he could still wear the uniform and play around in the dirt).

[This reminds me of the guy I met who was color blind, the guy who had a peptic ulcer and the two guys, who -believe it or not- were blind in one eye. And surprisingly, the latter two were both Chiefs of Smoke.]

In an army of its size, almost anything can happen.

Paul
RVN '70 - '71
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:10 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
22,315 posts, read 33,192,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadhunterPaul View Post
Suggest to him he join his State Militia where the odds of his being called up are nil (but he could still wear the uniform and play around in the dirt).
Sorry but you are incorrect. I guess by "State Militia" you mean the National Guard. The National Guard, the oldest component of the Armed Forces of the United States. A bit outdated, so the numbers are greater. Between September 2001 and November 30, 2007, a total of 254,894 National Guard, have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

In 2008, 7% of U.S. Forces in Iraq was by National Guard.
In 2008, 15% of U.S. Forces in Afghanistan was by National Guard.

REFERENCE: www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RS22451.pdf

There have been 4,210 U.S. Army service members who have died in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, and 480 from the U.S. Army National Guard

REFERENCE: Faces of the Fallen - The Washington Post
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:23 PM
 
Location: KC, MO
699 posts, read 515,128 times
Reputation: 579
Default Poncho! I Said "State Militia"!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
Sorry but you are incorrect. I guess by "State Militia" you mean the National Guard.
Poncho, I am a combat veteran.

I certainly know the difference between the Active Army, the Army Reserve and the National Guard.

I served about four years Active and several in the NG.

I said, "State Militia'.

YOU look it up.

I could be mistaken (but not likely, yuk, yuk) but I'm thinking it has been AGES since the State Militia has been called to Active Duty.

When one is in the SM one wears a real army uniform and one can even apply for NCOES.

To my surprise, while attending BNOC, we had a SM guy in our midst.

I stared and stared but he really was in the SM.


Look Before You Leap, Poncho.


Paul
RVN Jul '70 - Dec '71
25th ID/101st ABN DIV (Airmobile)
2/77th FA
2/22nd (Mech) Inf
Convoy Medic/Hai Van Pass
Eagle Dustoff
CMB
ACB
Two awards of the BSM, one with a V
PH

And forgive me for bragging but when General Thurmon was passing out medals to us, I'm the only one with whom he had a conversation. Which was odd, I thought, since the other guys got Silvers that day.

I'm not saying I'm the coolest, I am saying I certainly know the diff between the SM and the NG.

Last edited by HeadhunterPaul; 04-29-2013 at 07:29 PM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
467 posts, read 1,112,241 times
Reputation: 449
HeadhunterPaul,

You are correct. There is a difference between the State Militia and the National Guard.

We have a Oklahoma State Militia and it consists of three classes. Although I've never done any reasearch on what distinguishes the classes because I never had a reason to. Now you've given me a reason to learn something new. Dang you. :-)


Oklahoma Code 4441.
Composition of Militia Classes.
The Militia of the State of Oklahoma shall consist of all ablebodied citizens of the United States and all other ablebodied persons who shall be or shall have declared their intentions to become citizens of the United States, who shall be more than seventeen (17) years of age and not more than seventy (70) years of age, and said militia shall be divided into three (3) classes: The National Guard, the Oklahoma State Guard, and the Unorganized Militia.
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Old 05-01-2013, 07:36 PM
 
254 posts, read 152,632 times
Reputation: 130
Tell him C-O-L-L-E-G-E
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