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Old 08-14-2013, 07:39 PM
 
7,669 posts, read 6,032,594 times
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3 long stories short

1. Odessa Ukraine, sailor got drunk on vodka and woke up married to a member of the Russian mafia
2. Gaeta Italy, sailor drunk at a bar rubs up against the wrong woman. Next day Italian police and NIS (now NCIS) met him on the ship and told him the local Italian mafia had a hit out on him and he wasn't to leave the skin of the ship while in Italy until they gave him the all clear. BTW, Gaeta Italy was our home port.
3. Drunk sailor awakes in his own rack wearing women's Mickey Mouse panties and all his nights clothing are in the female berthing. He had no memory of the night.
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Old 08-14-2013, 10:29 PM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,300,151 times
Reputation: 886
My priority in the USN was fun. It cost me in advancement but I travelled the world and had a great time for the 4 years of my enlistment. I left the navy An E 3 radioman and was pretty good at my job and paid enough attention to shine on one day shortly before I was discharged

We had been in the yards overhauling my ship and one day during the yard period when we were putting the ship back together and ET who was installing our equipment pulled me aside to show me what he was doing. He was re arranging patch panels to accomodated some new state of the art medium speed printers that were installed. When He did this he had to move a patch to a teletype that went to combat used only for mapping weather. So he moved this patch way over to a panel that was completely empty all the way to the end in patch position #1. If you didnt see this happen you would never know this patch had been moved so therefore would not be able to make use of the weather teletype in combat. The ET left shortly after this so I was the only person on the boat who knew how to patch this weather teletype so it could be used

After the yards you do what is called a shakedown cruise where you go out and test eveything to make sure it works and that is followed by several excersizes to troubleshoot all systems on the boat to make sure everything is battle ready. One day during these excersizes i came up to radio to do my 12 hour shift that started a 6 in the evening to 6 in the morning. Radio is freaking chaotic from a heavy amount of message traffic and it was full of officers which was highly unusual. Everyone was scrambling and panicking as something seemed very wrong. As a lowly E 3 I didnt concern myself with such drama as the guy I was relieving passed the status of our task on to me. Afte a few minutes of setteling in at my job I started to tune into the big crisis and you guessed it. They had a strong weather signal up on a reciever but didnt know which patch would send it over to the teletype in combat. How could they, me and that ET were the only people on the planet who knew where the patch was. So I played it off for a little bit and waited until the right people were in radio and asked

"whats the problem"?

The whole place stopped, everyone looked at me. An E 5 who I had been serving with for a long time and a very good friend to this day asked in the most hopeful way, Dave do you know what happened to the patch for the teletype over in combat. I walk over to pull the patch and set it and immediately over the intercom combat comes up and says the teletypes up and running, crisis over. The TAO, DIV OFF and Chief the RM 1 were all like, oh thats right, hes just an E3 but he has been on this boat working in this radio shack longer than any of us.

So the lowley E3 who was in and out of trouble was the hero. To this day I smile at the memory of the looks on their faces when I threw that patch
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Old 08-15-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,760 posts, read 43,604,189 times
Reputation: 14664
While I was on my first boat, we took her into the Newport News shipyard for overhaul and refueling.

While in the shipyard, we all had to wear hardhats and steel-toe boots. It was included with our normal daily uniform. To even walk through the gate into the shipyard you had to have a hardhat on.

One day our command put up a bunch of notices saying that the following day we were going to have a formation on the pier and we were to all wear hardhats and steel-toe boots.

I spoke with our chief about it. Since we were required to wear hardhats and steel-toe boots everyday anyway, what is the sense of having a hardhats and steel-toe boots formation?

He insisted that the CO/XO knew what they were doing, so I should just be on time and make sure I was wearing a proper hardhat and steel-toe boots.

The next morning I showed up on the pier in my hardhat and steel-toe boots.

Boy they got mad at me.

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Old 08-15-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley,az summer/east valley Az winter
2,014 posts, read 3,318,200 times
Reputation: 7708
Was flown into Cam Rahn Bay to give OJT to a new guy fixing doppler radar. Chief there was a guy that had worked right beside me in Hawaii. At that time I was the UHF radio tech. He said they needed some UHF radios up immediately, do whatever I wanted to get it done. Stopped at supply and picked up a couple radios and headed for the workbench. 1st class tried to chew me out for drawing 2 radios for repair at same time. Only one on workbench at time was the rule. Told him to check with the chief and to bring me another couple radios on way back. In about 15 minutes he returned to the bench carrying 2 more radios and apologized. With a little canniblisation had three radios up in about an hour, cleared through the 1st class who was the inspector and a couple army types picked up the radios right from the bench (unusual). Seems that the perimeter helicopters were all down for lack of radios do to lack of tech. They were up and flying within the hour. Their radio tech checked in a week later (just as I left) but for that week I was not bothered by many of the petty workplace rules the others complained to me about.

reason no techs~ obsolete equipment. That seems to be my specialty as I could fix a lot of the stuff that they said was obsolete but was still being used. Just a matter of reading the manual more times than not. nobody else was willing to try to fix it.
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Old 08-16-2013, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
8,575 posts, read 4,628,375 times
Reputation: 16432
Quote:
Originally Posted by boner View Post
came up to radio to do my 12 hour shift that started a 6 in the evening to 6 in the morning.
yeah, join the navy and work half days.
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Old 08-16-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,760 posts, read 43,604,189 times
Reputation: 14664
Quote:
Originally Posted by f.2 View Post
yeah, join the navy and work half days.
Even when I was on shore-duty [I did two tours of shore-duty], we only worked half of each month. We rotated a one month of day-shift and then a month of night-shift. 12 on and 12 off.

12 off gives plenty of time to file reports, maintain equipment, and any other office routines that can not be done while on-duty, then commute home, eat a meal, laundry, visit the wife and kids, before the next shift starts.

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Old 08-16-2013, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
13,997 posts, read 12,794,721 times
Reputation: 30423
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
While I was on my first boat, we took her into the Newport News shipyard for overhaul and refueling.

While in the shipyard, we all had to wear hardhats and steel-toe boots. It was included with our normal daily uniform. To even walk through the gate into the shipyard you had to have a hardhat on.

One day our command put up a bunch of notices saying that the following day we were going to have a formation on the pier and we were to all wear hardhats and steel-toe boots.

I spoke with our chief about it. Since we were required to wear hardhats and steel-toe boots everyday anyway, what is the sense of having a hardhats and steel-toe boots formation?

He insisted that the CO/XO knew what they were doing, so I should just be on time and make sure I was wearing a proper hardhat and steel-toe boots.

The next morning I showed up on the pier in my hardhat and steel-toe boots.

Boy they got mad at me.

I don't understand the joke.
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Old 08-17-2013, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,760 posts, read 43,604,189 times
Reputation: 14664
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
I don't understand the joke.
I did as we were instructed, I wore my hard hat and steel toe boots. Everyone else wore their uniform, plus hard hat and steel toe boots.
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Old 08-17-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: The South
3,405 posts, read 2,441,261 times
Reputation: 4972
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I did as we were instructed, I wore my hard hat and steel toe boots. Everyone else wore their uniform, plus hard hat and steel toe boots.
Did that get you an Article 15 for malicious obedience?
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Old 08-17-2013, 10:06 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
22,881 posts, read 34,695,070 times
Reputation: 26541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
Did that get you an Article 15 for malicious obedience?
The Navy does not issue Article 15's.... They present them with a "captain's mast"...
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