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Old 08-17-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,168 posts, read 42,301,748 times
Reputation: 13908

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
Did that get you an Article 15 for malicious obedience?
No, they just yelled at me to go put my uniform back on.
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Old 08-17-2013, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
8,036 posts, read 4,240,487 times
Reputation: 15241
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
The Navy does not issue Article 15's.... They present them with a "captain's mast"...
I've attended numerous Captain's Mast proceedings. Never as the man of the hour, lol. In the Navy, you are placed on report like any of the other services. Then, depending on the severity of the offense, is how the case is handled. A run of the mill offense is first given to the XO (aka Executive Officer) mast. S/He brings the offender front and center and they find out what's what. Then it goes to CPO (aka Chief Petty Officer) DRB (aka disciplinary review board). Watch out. Here's where the **** hits the fan. Your LCPO (leading CPO) is there, the offender is standing tall, and it's run by the CMC (Command Master Chief, E-9) in the Chief's Mess. The gloves come off. Long story short, the DRB can recommend handling at the chain of command level and the case can be dropped. But that's if the DRB's significant emotional event is thought to have been enough to steer the young man to the straight and narrow. I never have seen a female DRB (or Captain's Mast). Females were for the most part better behaved, from the last couple of years that I served with them.
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Old 08-17-2013, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,168 posts, read 42,301,748 times
Reputation: 13908
Quote:
Originally Posted by f.2 View Post
I've attended numerous Captain's Mast proceedings. Never as the man of the hour, lol. In the Navy, you are placed on report like any of the other services. Then, depending on the severity of the offense, is how the case is handled. A run of the mill offense is first given to the XO (aka Executive Officer) mast. S/He brings the offender front and center and they find out what's what. Then it goes to CPO (aka Chief Petty Officer) DRB (aka disciplinary review board). Watch out. Here's where the **** hits the fan. Your LCPO (leading CPO) is there, the offender is standing tall, and it's run by the CMC (Command Master Chief, E-9) in the Chief's Mess. The gloves come off. Long story short, the DRB can recommend handling at the chain of command level and the case can be dropped. But that's if the DRB's significant emotional event is thought to have been enough to steer the young man to the straight and narrow. I never have seen a female DRB (or Captain's Mast). Females were for the most part better behaved, from the last couple of years that I served with them.
I went to Captain's Mast once. I was convicted, sentenced, fined, then the sentencing and fine were both suspended, and I was promoted [E4 to E5]. My LPO [my Div CPO] and COB were both present at my CO's Mast.

I have never seen an XO mast. I have never seen a DRB CMCs are also called COB and they can be an E8.

On boats I have served on the COB usually decides whether the Chief can handle things or not. Then he brings the charge to the XO. The XO decides whether to put it in front of the CO.

I have never served with females at sea. I was only on Active Duty from the '70s until '01, mine was not a very long career. I have no idea if females behave better or worse.

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Old 02-27-2017, 05:49 PM
 
1 posts, read 188 times
Reputation: 20
Talking A memorable first in-port watch !

I reported to my first ship the evening before getting underway for 12 days, so my first in-port watch was after I was somewhat settled in already. Being new, I had been assigned one of the less preferred bunk spaces, right next to the door to the head. We had pulled into port just before suppertime, and I was put on watch, UI (under Instruction), walking around the Engineering spaces and taking readings on various pieces of equipment.

During the 2000 - 0000 watch, I could hear calls from a small crew who was doing maintenance on the CHT system, and yes, that's exactly what it was if you pronounce the 'C' as an 'S' ! Right as my watch was finishing up, they had finished the work and prepared for a test. Our system operated on a freshwater flush with a vacuum on the 1,400 gallon tank to pull all the 'material' into it. Due to fatigue on the part of the guys connecting it back together, they inadvertently connected 30 psi of compressed air to the tank instead of several inches of vacuum. Now, the flushing mechanism was designed to open briefly and then close by the suction caused by the vacuum in the line, and if pressurized instead, the valve would not close. With the crew working on it being Engineers, they sent one guy into the head in Engineering berthing to test the system. At the test flush, the 30 psi worked very much differently than the 14 inches of vacuum, causing the line to spew at 30 psi a foul mixture right out of the toilet in a geyser about a foot high. Can you imagine this? Fourteen hundred gallons pouring out a three inch line under pressure until the compressed air was shut off, and bled, which took several seconds, say, maybe thirty or so. Luckily, the head was designed for rough seas and we were secure at the pier, so the six inch boundary of the head contained the waste, but my rack was about two steps away. The person who hooked up the wrong line was 'volunteered' to clean it up, and not surprisingly other volunteers were scarce. I was new and didn't really know any good places to hide and sleep on-board, plus since I was on duty I needed to be available, just in case.

So I volunteered to help the poor sap and we waded in to clean it up. With two of us working, it was only the matter of a few hours with buckets, mops and a lot of bleach. We double-bagged our boots and had our work uniforms washed separately from all other clothes, and maybe tossed a few articles. By the time we finished there were still a few hours before reveille and we were exhausted. And now I wasn't worried about how my rack smelled. We also knew exactly what everyone on board had eaten for the past 48 hours.

I had a great story to tell and a guy who was very grateful for my assistance so that he finished the nasty job before breakfast was served. Plus, I was sure that I would never have a worse in-port watch for the rest of my time in the Navy, and I didn't.
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Old 02-27-2017, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,168 posts, read 42,301,748 times
Reputation: 13908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlyx View Post
I reported to my first ship the evening before getting underway for 12 days, so my first in-port watch was after I was somewhat settled in already. Being new, I had been assigned one of the less preferred bunk spaces, right next to the door to the head. We had pulled into port just before suppertime, and I was put on watch, UI (under Instruction), walking around the Engineering spaces and taking readings on various pieces of equipment.

During the 2000 - 0000 watch, I could hear calls from a small crew who was doing maintenance on the CHT system, and yes, that's exactly what it was if you pronounce the 'C' as an 'S' ! Right as my watch was finishing up, they had finished the work and prepared for a test. Our system operated on a freshwater flush with a vacuum on the 1,400 gallon tank to pull all the 'material' into it. Due to fatigue on the part of the guys connecting it back together, they inadvertently connected 30 psi of compressed air to the tank instead of several inches of vacuum. Now, the flushing mechanism was designed to open briefly and then close by the suction caused by the vacuum in the line, and if pressurized instead, the valve would not close. With the crew working on it being Engineers, they sent one guy into the head in Engineering berthing to test the system. At the test flush, the 30 psi worked very much differently than the 14 inches of vacuum, causing the line to spew at 30 psi a foul mixture right out of the toilet in a geyser about a foot high. Can you imagine this? Fourteen hundred gallons pouring out a three inch line under pressure until the compressed air was shut off, and bled, which took several seconds, say, maybe thirty or so. Luckily, the head was designed for rough seas and we were secure at the pier, so the six inch boundary of the head contained the waste, but my rack was about two steps away. The person who hooked up the wrong line was 'volunteered' to clean it up, and not surprisingly other volunteers were scarce. I was new and didn't really know any good places to hide and sleep on-board, plus since I was on duty I needed to be available, just in case.

So I volunteered to help the poor sap and we waded in to clean it up. With two of us working, it was only the matter of a few hours with buckets, mops and a lot of bleach. We double-bagged our boots and had our work uniforms washed separately from all other clothes, and maybe tossed a few articles. By the time we finished there were still a few hours before reveille and we were exhausted. And now I wasn't worried about how my rack smelled. We also knew exactly what everyone on board had eaten for the past 48 hours.

I had a great story to tell and a guy who was very grateful for my assistance so that he finished the nasty job before breakfast was served. Plus, I was sure that I would never have a worse in-port watch for the rest of my time in the Navy, and I didn't.
It was long ago decided that pumping a sanitary tank to sea is too noisy. So we pressurize the sanitary tanks and 'vent' them to sea. To make it flow smoothly the pressure needs to be greater than sea pressure. Which varies depending on how deep we are. So it could be as much as 3600psi that we are putting into that sanitary tank.

On subs the toilets are all 4" ball valves. The lever for the ball valve is a 2 foot long handle. To operate the ball valve, you basically have to bend over with your face near the toilet seat. The secret is to be fully wake and alert. You open a faucet that puts a little water on the ball valve, and you operate it slowly, watching for bubbles. If you see any bubbles coming up from the ball valve, that tells you the tank has pressure, stop. Anyone who is too tired or groggy, not paying attention, who opens a pressurized toilet ball valve is called a 'venter'. They have 'vented' the sanitary tank inboard. Sub heads are all stainless steel. The walls, doors, ceiling, everything can be safely hosed down and the floor has a deck drain. So cleaning a sub head is not difficult. Each toilet stall has a brass plaque mounted on the door that lists the names of every crewman who has vented that toilet. From plank-owners to decom crew some of those lists are long.

Sub docs are well experienced in the process of helping crewmen to flush out their sinuses and removing feces from underneath their eyelids. When it comes at you with a few thousand psi behind it, it will fill your sinuses and under your eyelids.

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