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Old 04-05-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: The Land of Reason
13,292 posts, read 10,108,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zot View Post
See if your son would care to spend time with some disabled vets. The vets may appreciate his help, and he may learn a bit about service that a recruiter may forget to mention.
True, a good start would be to visit the VA hospital and sit in one of the clinics and talk to those who recently served. they will not lie about what they did or where they been and how they are/were treated by the government.
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Old 04-05-2014, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,554 posts, read 8,019,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simetime View Post
True, a good start would be to visit the VA hospital and sit in one of the clinics and talk to those who recently served. they will not lie about what they did or where they been and how they are/were treated by the government.
While there are many solid vets getting treated at the VA, you'll find a lot of disgruntled vets there also and these guys probably are not the best ones to get the "real scoop" on military service. A lot of the disgruntled vets will be disgruntled at the military when in actuality their behavior is what got them in trouble in the first place.

The problem Sailors I had on active duty that I kicked out for disciplinary issues spent a lot more time at medical than the squared away Sailors that kept their noses clean and did their job. I'd suspect you'll find a similar situation at a VA hospital.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:00 PM
Status: "It takes a lot of balls to golf like me" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Charleston, SC
3,964 posts, read 3,196,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramidsurf View Post
Locate Schools | goarmy.com

Nearly every state school has a program.

Most state school programs let smaller schools nearby participate by coming to campus for the military classes. That's how it was for the Army ROTC program at my school.

You can also apply for scholarship and they cover tuition (not sure about room and board) and, in return, you owe 5 years after graduation. You can also self sponsor which means you pay your way but are guaranteed a commission upon graduation.

It's the best and easiest route (relatively speaking) to a commission.

OCS is extremely difficult to get accepted to.

The military academies provide full tuition, room and board, and a stipend. The catch is the academies are very prestigious and very difficult to get accepted to.
Thanks I'll check it out!
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:17 PM
 
Location: The Land of Reason
13,292 posts, read 10,108,645 times
Reputation: 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBTRS View Post
While there are many solid vets getting treated at the VA, you'll find a lot of disgruntled vets there also and these guys probably are not the best ones to get the "real scoop" on military service. A lot of the disgruntled vets will be disgruntled at the military when in actuality their behavior is what got them in trouble in the first place.

The problem Sailors I had on active duty that I kicked out for disciplinary issues spent a lot more time at medical than the squared away Sailors that kept their noses clean and did their job. I'd suspect you'll find a similar situation at a VA hospital.
Nope, those who get kicked out of the military are not seen there (no benefits). The vast majority who are there have served and have honorable discharges and most will gladly share their experiences both good and bad. Would you rather get an ex-Navy Seal or Green Beret to tell you what it is like to serve in the face of danger or some pencil pushing private who never left his desk?

I have talked to many combat vets and they all agree that there are too many "video-Game Commados" who are led to believe that the military life is just like the games that they play, but when they see someone get killed or they have to kill someone they are the first to claim PTSD and are "babied" by the government for the rest of their lives.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:29 PM
Status: "It takes a lot of balls to golf like me" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Charleston, SC
3,964 posts, read 3,196,083 times
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We have a large VA hospital here in town, I will ask him if he would like to go visit. I don't think it's a bad idea. I'm not trying to shelter him by no means.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,633 posts, read 4,399,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramidsurf View Post
I am a prior enlisted Officer and I can confidently tell you that being prior enlisted has absolutely no bearing on how you perform as an Officer.

Good Officers are good because they understand the job, their position, and how to be a leader. Spending some time in the enlisted ranks does not mean that you'll understand leadership or the correct way to handle things.

Sure, the enlisted men might like a prior e, but it's not an Officer's job to be well liked because of their past life. It's their job to work with the senior enlisted and make decisions.

You don't have to believe me, but I'm talking from first hand experience. It's gotten to the point that many prior enlisted Officers in the Navy that I know try and hide their past because they don't want to be associated with it.

And obviously, I'm not the only who thinks this. Other posters (both senior enlisted and Officer) can corroborate my views.
I was a prior enlisted that became an Officer, and I completely disagree with this.

You come across like it is actively bad to have been prior enlisted.

A good Officer doesn't need to have been prior enlisted, but having walked a mile in the subordinate's boots goes a long way to understanding what they are thinking. Understanding that helps you formulate decisions that not only accomplish the mission, but may take morale and Soldier welfare into account, also. There is a big difference between that and trying to be liked.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:45 PM
Status: "It takes a lot of balls to golf like me" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Charleston, SC
3,964 posts, read 3,196,083 times
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Ok let me ask this. If he were to enlist, then switch to officer training. Would he still be able to retire at the same age as if he'd gone to O school to start off? Or would it be pushed back 5 years?
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,633 posts, read 4,399,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseManOnceSaid View Post
Ok let me ask this. If he were to enlist, then switch to officer training. Would he still be able to retire at the same age as if he'd gone to O school to start off? Or would it be pushed back 5 years?
Under current rules, 20 years of *active* service to get an active retirement, full stop. Any combination, but to retire as an officer, the last 10 must have been as an officer.

Note I said active. Doing Guard or reserve isn't going to be creditable in the same proportion as an active year.

Also note there are most likely changes coming to the retirement plan. It keeps coming up and I suspect it's only a matter of time.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:23 PM
 
9,358 posts, read 15,818,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseManOnceSaid View Post
Besides the Citadel and West Point, what recommendations are out there for ROTC Army colleges?

Most colleges have a ROTC program.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:27 PM
 
9,358 posts, read 15,818,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseManOnceSaid View Post
Ok let me ask this. If he were to enlist, then switch to officer training. Would he still be able to retire at the same age as if he'd gone to O school to start off? Or would it be pushed back 5 years?
Yes, he'd be pushed back four or five years. If he can get some college while he is in, it might only be three years. Regardless, he will do much better in retirement retiring at an O pay grade as opposed to an E pay grade; he will just be in his early 40s instead of his late 30s.

Last edited by joe from dayton; 04-05-2014 at 06:37 PM..
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