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Old 04-13-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
9,871 posts, read 8,019,083 times
Reputation: 11232

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It doesn't make me uncomfortable. But I was really an awful Navy Officer and my Vietnam tour(s) were quite safe. I think I hurt the cause more than I helped it. I can't say I made America a more dangerous place, but I didn't help much to make a safer place, either.
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Old 04-13-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,165 posts, read 18,145,570 times
Reputation: 9904
Professional soldiers get my thanks when they cash their pay checks.
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Old 04-13-2014, 01:38 PM
 
33,057 posts, read 12,532,839 times
Reputation: 20944
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Why is it one or the other? How do you know that person saying thank you isn't also doing all of the above? Presume much?

I find it hard to believe that any servicemen or women that I pick a bar tab up for are feeling like charity cases.


I think of the horrible way the Vietnam Vets were treated and it makes my blood boil.
If everyone who said "Thank you for your service," to a strange soldier, got busy and voted for politicians who did the right thing by soldiers, this mess would be fixed.

We all stood by why Congress cut food stamps. Google how many soldiers and vets are on food stamps.

Every so often there is another expose of another medical mess with soldiers. They need decent medical care, not someone picking up a bar tab.

Our blood should be boiling over the way we are sending soldiers back time after time to be ground up in Afghanistan. And for what?
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Old 04-13-2014, 01:42 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
1,764 posts, read 2,227,128 times
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Again, you are being presumptuous. You don't know what people are doing to help veterans. Every male in my family and my spouse's family has served in some branch of the military. My brother is currently in Afghanistan and I want him (and everyone) to come home. You don't have the right to tell anybody what should make their blood boil or what they should do about your indigination about any given situation. The REALITY is these men and women deserve to be thanked regardless of what is or is not happening in Washington to bring them ALL home.
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Old 04-13-2014, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,532,009 times
Reputation: 17595
Most of my Active Duty career was accomplished in an era when US citizens generally were not happy with the military. We were always told to travel in civilian clothes, to avoid uniforms in public. I have been stationed in various places where you would be written up if you were seen commuting to work in uniform.

In the later 70s and through the 80s, we were hated, everyone knew it.

I was pretty much in shock, during DS#1 when civilians began acting like they liked the military. When yellow ribbons first came out, I remember sitting in a conference where they were asking what the meaning was. Were we being called yellow? Or if it was from the song "tie a yellow ribbon" then was it saying that we were all felons?

On-base, we really did not know. Nobody in uniform knew what it meant.

Times have certainly changes since then.

My older brother refuses to wear or display anything to acknowledge that he is a vet. The last time I went out to visit him, I was wearing a BDU ballcap with my rank insignia on it. I was in a store when a 20-something girl ran up to me, she hugged me, kissed me, and thanked me for serving. I was soon in tears. A bit later I told my brother about what had happened. He remains in complete denial that civilians could ever like the military.

Today I see communities that put together care packages for troops, letter writing campaigns, etc. This is just totally different.

When I was in A-school my grandfather died, a Red Cross message was sent to my school to notify me. 40 years later it has not arrived yet. Today I bet notification would arrive within a few days.
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Old 04-13-2014, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Rathdrum, ID
4,123 posts, read 3,875,461 times
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It hasn't happened often, but when I hear "Thank you for your service", it makes me a little uncomfortable. I always say, "you're welcome", and usually politely decline to answer many follow-up questions, other than where and when I served.

However, when I have the opportunity, I always say, "Thank you for your sacrifice in serving your country", because I just know that they have sacrificed something. Doesn't matter why they are serving, they have had to give up something. I also have anonymously paid for a few meals, as several others here have also done.
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Old 04-13-2014, 06:13 PM
 
Location: In your feelings
2,199 posts, read 1,491,317 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishtom29 View Post
Professional soldiers get my thanks when they cash their pay checks.
Uh, no. Paychecks aren't a token of gratitude, they are what an employee earns.
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Old 04-13-2014, 06:36 PM
 
33,057 posts, read 12,532,839 times
Reputation: 20944
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Why is it one or the other? How do you know that person saying thank you isn't also doing all of the above? Presume much?

I find it hard to believe that any servicemen or women that I pick a bar tab up for are feeling like charity cases.

My dad is a WWII veteran that had NINE ships sunk out from under him. Nine.

Every single day he gets thanked and he is very grateful for every kind word shown to him.
It's nice that your dad is grateful when someone shows him a kind word.

My dad is a WWII veteran. My husband a veteran of Vietnam. My nephew is back and forth to Afghanistan on six inch centers.

Dad's gone now, but neither my husband nor my nephew appreciate strangers approaching them with a "Thank you for your service." They think it is intrusive and awkward.

They want decent medical care, decent pay, they want to be treated like the honorable men they are. My husband still feels betrayed by Vietnam. We were there for bogus reasons. Sound familiar?

Our soldiers signed up to defend our country, not Halliburton. There was no evidence that Afghanistan attacked us on 9/11 or that Iraq had WMDs for that matter. This whole thing has been a huge mess, cost a lot of lives, left countless people with injuries that will never heal.

$100 donation to the Disabled American Veterans, picking up a bar tab, or a teary-eyed thank-you doesn't cover it. Not by a long shot.
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Old 04-13-2014, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,501 posts, read 18,468,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
$100 donation to the Disabled American Veterans, picking up a bar tab, or a teary-eyed thank-you doesn't cover it. Not by a long shot.
As a civilian, I know I am doing the best I can in order to show my appreciation. I donate regularly to the veterans through legitimate none profit organizations, I say thank you for your service to the veterans every time I get a chance; I am looking for information on the internet in order to volunteer at VA hospital; I even get into intense arguments with people on the internet in order to debunk myth about militaries.

Although my brother is considered to be peace time Marine, he has done ops overseas. He has done very dangerous jobs. He missed my school graduation, I had to seek professional help in order to deal with stress because I thought I was going to lose my own brother. Not a living soul has thanked my brother for his service, and nobody cared about his sacrifice and his service. He is very successful now and doesn't even bother to tell people his past military experience. But as soon as people learned he used to serve in the Marine Corps, they automatically assume he must be receiving all these fancy benefits we never heard of. My family sacrificed as well.

You are saying $100 donation doesn't cover it. But we are doing the best we can. I can not imagine in my wildest dreams that saying thank you for your service can cause such hard feelings.

The U.S. military and American society are drifting apart. It’s tough inside the civilian world to discern the drift. Military can sense it too. Why don't you read the shocking top story on TIME magazine called "An army apart."

Eventually, all wars will be looked down upon, but most of us civilians know that we thank our troops everyday for their service, and we truly mean it.

We civilians are truly doing the best we can. Most of us do have veterans best interests in our hearts and on our minds. Please give us some credits where credits are due.
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Old 04-13-2014, 07:43 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,166,433 times
Reputation: 3121
^^^^^^^

The best post i have read in a very long time lily. Mahalo

Me personally i was a non war vet (desert shield), but its nice to hear thank you but its not required nor expectted because it was an honor to do so. Further my time in the military i got more out of it then lost. We need to remember that theres a difference between policy and our soldiers. Hate the politics but not the soldiers.

Last edited by hawaiian by heart; 04-13-2014 at 07:55 PM..
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