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Old 04-13-2014, 10:47 PM
 
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My military friends hate being thanked. They don't feel that they deserve it nor did they do it for the public. They joined for themselves. One of them in particular will ignore those who thank him if he is in a bad mood. If he's in a good mood then he will say "thanks" and then ignore them. It may seem rude but it's not obligated to thank them nor did he(or other like minded soldiers) ask for your thanks. I'm sure they are in the minority but it is interesting how they hate receiving attention for doing their job.
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Old 04-14-2014, 04:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow Jacket View Post
My military friends hate being thanked. They don't feel that they deserve it nor did they do it for the public. They joined for themselves. One of them in particular will ignore those who thank him if he is in a bad mood. If he's in a good mood then he will say "thanks" and then ignore them. It may seem rude but it's not obligated to thank them nor did he(or other like minded soldiers) ask for your thanks. I'm sure they are in the minority but it is interesting how they hate receiving attention for doing their job.
I wonder if they are in the minority. Most of our military friends are retired now, so it only happens if they are wearing a jacket or cap with their unit on it. My nephew says it is usually older people and he says thank you and asks what unit they served in. Usually, they say something about never having served in the military but admire those who do.

It got me to wondering about folks on this thread who say, "Thank you for your service." How many have been in the military?
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,385 posts, read 18,420,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
My nephew says it is usually older people and he says thank you and asks what unit they served in. Usually, they say something about never having served in the military but admire those who do.

It got me to wondering about folks on this thread who say, "Thank you for your service." How many have been in the military?
1. I am still in my 20s, so I wonder if I am one of those "older people".

My brother served in the Marine Corps, he is in his late 30s. I don't remember he has ever been thanked for his service, but then again, he does not tell anyone he was in the Marine Corps, it is not necessary to broadcast it to civilians (his words, not mine.) When he was active duty, people perhaps have thanked him for his service, I have to ask. I don't know this for sure.

When my brother saw an active duty military service person, especially a Marine, he sometimes tried to have a conversation and told them to stay safe.

I say "Thank you for your service" every single time I get a chance because I want to let them know that I appreciate their sacrifices. I don't ask them what unit they served in because it doesn't matter to me. Even if they tell me what unit they serve in, I won't understand what they talk about anyway.

2. I've never served one day in the military, but I have many combat Marine friends. You can click on my user name and see the pictures I posted on my album. All my friends are in their late 20s, early 30s, many of them are combat troops from Afghanistan. I've lost friends in battle field.

They always told me "You are welcome" or "thank you for your support" after I told them "Thank you for your service." I asked them if they wanted to be thanked, they said it was always nice to be acknowledged.


As a matter of what, many of my combat troops friends have told me that it frustrated them because they couldn't share their experiences with their civilian girlfriends or civilians friends. Most people don't like to talk about military because this subject don't interest them.

So I will keep on saying "thank you for your service" to veterans and active duty service people. Politics aside, I think showing people with basic human decency shows good characters because kindness and compassion matter to me.

You posted that your nephew hated been thanked. I will respect that too.

Last edited by lilyflower3191981; 04-14-2014 at 06:07 AM..
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Old 04-14-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
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I have never thanked anybody who wasn't in uniform unless I knew, for an absolute fact, they were a veteran (the airport does some veteran events here). I wouldn't assume a person is affiliated with anything just because it was on a cap they were wearing.

I can only think of one time I was embarrassed (probably not the correct word) when thanking someone in uniform. She was in my doctor's office and checking out. I didn't see she had a drink in her hand because her back was to the waiting room. I said "Thank you for serving and be safe out there." She turned and said "Thank you for that!" with a mouth full of whatever she was drinking. I apologized for making her have to maneuver that and she smiled and waved goodbye.

As I mentioned, every male in my family and my spouse's family has served and I have lost family members in the service. I do not just think about our soldiers on Veteran's Day or Memorial Day, but every day. I am truly grateful for the privilege of living in a democratic society and regardless of how one feels about any of the wars or the politics behind them, these men and women stand up for our freedom.
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
The DoD thanks you? Really? I'm jealous. They just give my husband the paycheck that he earns. But I don't think he's ever gotten a thank you. I'm impressed! Maybe if he were in a rifle unit...
I don't think he meant the DoD thanks him literally, but by paying him.
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Old 04-14-2014, 07:56 AM
 
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I am a disabled veteran from the Viet Nam era. As such, I use my ID Card for a variety of things, including, for instance a discount at certain retail locations. Many times when I show the card, people thank me for my service. It is a little awkward...because....

During the time which I served, we were the lowest form of life. We were fighting a war (it was our job) that the people hated, had no interest in, and therefore anyone associated with it was the lowest form of dirt. We were told to NOT wear our uniform outside of military functions, and to 'blend in' with society and not draw attention to ourselves. People spit on us, burned the American Flag, and generally made us feel like scum.

Now, we have just the opposite: People saying "Thank You". I know they mean well. I wonder sometimes how sincere they are, or whether it is just a "popular" thing for the moment, and come another difficult military struggle which the 'people' don't embrace will they turn on us once again?

So, I take it for what it is worth. A little awkward. A little humble. A little twinge of remembering those around us who never lived to get any sort of thanks. A little angst over the pain I feel every day (fractured spine) which they can't possibly share, nor appreciate.And a little curiosity that the person offering the thanks doesn't really have any idea what they are saying but if it makes them feel better, it makes me feel better as well.

We're all people. It is just one way for us to be friends and get through the day. It's okay.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,334,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceAndLove42 View Post
I don't think he meant the DoD thanks him literally, but by paying him.
Yep. Got that.

My point was that earning a paycheck is not the same as someone noting that they appreciate your service. You get paid because you performed a job. It's not a thank-you. Despite what the "You gettin' paid thanks to mah tax dollars is all the thanks you gonna get" crowd asserts.
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Old 04-14-2014, 11:03 AM
 
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My wife's a medical doc at a VA and she always thanks vets for their service when we're out and about as well as at work. She works with many people who don't have a family support structure, don't feel appreciated/wanted/etc. and she says far more really appreciate a sincere thanks compared to some that it may make feel awkward. She thinks it's worth the trade off to continue doing it.
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Old 04-14-2014, 11:26 AM
 
33,027 posts, read 12,488,458 times
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Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
I am a disabled veteran from the Viet Nam era. As such, I use my ID Card for a variety of things, including, for instance a discount at certain retail locations. Many times when I show the card, people thank me for my service. It is a little awkward...because....

During the time which I served, we were the lowest form of life. We were fighting a war (it was our job) that the people hated, had no interest in, and therefore anyone associated with it was the lowest form of dirt. We were told to NOT wear our uniform outside of military functions, and to 'blend in' with society and not draw attention to ourselves. People spit on us, burned the American Flag, and generally made us feel like scum.

Now, we have just the opposite: People saying "Thank You". I know they mean well. I wonder sometimes how sincere they are, or whether it is just a "popular" thing for the moment, and come another difficult military struggle which the 'people' don't embrace will they turn on us once again?

So, I take it for what it is worth. A little awkward. A little humble. A little twinge of remembering those around us who never lived to get any sort of thanks. A little angst over the pain I feel every day (fractured spine) which they can't possibly share, nor appreciate.And a little curiosity that the person offering the thanks doesn't really have any idea what they are saying but if it makes them feel better, it makes me feel better as well.

We're all people. It is just one way for us to be friends and get through the day. It's okay.
You brought tears to my eyes Ted Bear.

I think it is sort of a "popular" thing for people to say right now. It will likely fade over time.

By using National Guard troops and deploying soldiers over and over and over, the powers that be were able to avoid the draft which would have undoubtedly made these wars as unpopular as the last. My husband served several tours in Vietnam and I never understood why he was so despised. The war decisions were made at much high pay grade than his. Why were people spitting on him?
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Old 04-14-2014, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, Fl
1,280 posts, read 1,366,194 times
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If I run into a service member who served in a war time, or in a capacity of protection and interest in the US, I thank them. Otherwise, it's young people who replaced mommy and daddy by going in the service. (to be taken care of by the system) Military life excluding war time, is about as cushy as it gets. Sorry if that ruffles some feathers but it's true. All your basic needs are met, period! And you can have as much a guaranteed future as your willing to go and get.

I am thankful for the history of our military and realize none of us would be here today if not for them. But your kidding yourself if you think I'll walk up and thank some 19 year old sailor who went in to be taken care of and never served a day in war time.
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