U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-14-2016, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Metro Seattle Area - Born and Raised
417 posts, read 202,637 times
Reputation: 1260

Advertisements

It should be noted that until 1949 when the Armed Forces were ordered to integrate by President Truman, African Americans were treated very poorly by their White officers and the military "system." Often suffering far stiffer punishments that Whites for the same offense(s)... Even after integration, Arfican American still had to deal with "issues" until years and years later.

I enlisted back in 1980 in the Army and it seemed very fair to all non-Whites. "I" never witnessed any real/serious biases towards non-Whites, but I heard all the stories from guys who served in the 70s and earlier.

So when you research mutinous actions and rioting in the U.S. Armed Forces, you will discover a good number involving racial injustice issues. It's sad to say, but a human can only endure so much injustice in a system that they have to defend and possibly die for. Yet be seen, at best, as a second class citizen prior to 1949... I'm not justifying this type of actions, but I can see why it happened. AGAIN!! I'm not justifying rioting/mutinying by anybody in the Armed Forces! I'm just glad to be born later in the later half of the 20th century and didn't have to deal with that kind of BS.

Sad, but even in WW2, German POWs were often treated better than their African American guards, especially in the Southern States.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 12-14-2016 at 03:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-14-2016, 06:36 AM
 
Location: The South
4,543 posts, read 3,174,628 times
Reputation: 6638
I enlisted in 1957 and I never saw any mistreatment of African Americans. I served with them as fellow soldiers and for them as my First Sgt and Company Commander. I can't imagine a quicker way to get in trouble.

Last edited by Southern man; 12-14-2016 at 07:13 AM.. Reason: correction
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2016, 06:40 AM
 
4,948 posts, read 4,651,663 times
Reputation: 9197
Couldn't help but think of this.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nndGGnOFvMk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2016, 11:10 AM
 
48,944 posts, read 39,420,502 times
Reputation: 30590
Quote:
Originally Posted by bergun View Post
It should be noted that until 1949 when the Armed Forces were ordered to integrate by President Truman, African Americans were treated very poorly by their White officers and the military "system." Often suffering far stiffer punishments that Whites for the same offense(s)... Even after integration, Arfican American still had to deal with "issues" until years and years later.

I enlisted back in 1980 in the Army and it seemed very fair to all non-Whites. "I" never witnessed any real/serious biases towards non-Whites, but I heard all the stories from guys who served in the 70s and earlier.

So when you research mutinous actions and rioting in the U.S. Armed Forces, you will discover a good number involving racial injustice issues. It's sad to say, but a human can only endure so much injustice in a system that they have to defend and possibly die for. Yet be seen, at best, as a second class citizen prior to 1949... I'm not justifying this type of actions, but I can see why it happened. AGAIN!! I'm not justifying rioting/mutinying by anybody in the Armed Forces! I'm just glad to be born later in the later half of the 20th century and didn't have to deal with that kind of BS.

Sad, but even in WW2, German POWs were often treated better than their African American guards, especially in the Southern States.
Results were hit and miss but it happened.

As a solid example, there is a US medal of honor winner that was rescued from a concentration camp as a boy that fought for the US in Korea. His sergeant didn't like jews and didn't treat him well including helping to quash recognition of his actions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,738 posts, read 21,787,854 times
Reputation: 27806
What about the Asian Americans? I can't imagine things were any better for them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/442nd_...(United_States)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 11:35 AM
 
1,869 posts, read 1,180,532 times
Reputation: 3100
So this thread isn't exactly "off-topic" is it..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 11:45 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,145 posts, read 38,919,946 times
Reputation: 28124
Quote:
Originally Posted by adriver View Post
So this thread isn't exactly "off-topic" is it..
Depends...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2016, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,597 posts, read 2,972,201 times
Reputation: 3983
For the majority of both mine and my husband's time in the Army MP Corps there were no problems that we noted between races. However, when my DH was Stationed at the RCF (Regional Correctional Facility) with one of his best friends they discovered that there were some Commands that WERE unofficially still racially segregated.

DH is White, friend is Black and they both came from a closed prison camp from Ft. Polk, LA where they worked and spent leisure time together for over 4 years. They were shocked when it was clear that they were expected to "stay with their own kind". When they chose to room together and remain friends they were ostracized for the entire year.

The Command had their "favorites" and surprise surprise hey fell within racial lines. They were never so happy to leave that Command (both landed at the old Ft. Leavenworth prison and they were thrilled to be back at a "normal" Command; as they rose through the ranks they ensured that any whiff of racism was investigated. DH Retired in 2008. Nothing like MPs with "that type" of thought.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2016, 04:02 PM
 
17,934 posts, read 9,859,202 times
Reputation: 17422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
I enlisted in 1957 and I never saw any mistreatment of African Americans. I served with them as fellow soldiers and for them as my First Sgt and Company Commander. I can't imagine a quicker way to get in trouble.
My father and uncles in the military during those same years would disagree. One uncle was a young Air Force B-47 pilot during those years, and tells of being shut out of the O-club because he was black. Colin Powell says the same thing about the Army--he and other black officers had to hold a post protest to get access to the O-club.

Promotions were also tough for black troops when getting promoted was a matter of the First Sergeant and commander deciding who got the stripes in the unit. My black Air Force elders told me it was the best thing in the world when the Air Force when to the standardized promotion tests and put promotion primarly into the hands of the airmen themselves.

In my early years in the early 70s, I actually didn't even see a big issue in my own unit. I had a security classification that put me "behind the green door," so I didn't see what was happening in the offices outside. The commander and First Sergeant were systematically assigning all black clerk typists to the loading dock and putting only the white clerk typists in the office positions. Although the dock was a valid job for a clerk typist, the problem was that they didn't get a full range of experience and training in the job, nor did they get the "face time" that they'd get in the offices. That would add up to promotion disadvantage in a number of ways.

They protested, there was an investigation, and a finding against the commander and First Sergeant.

I would judge the racial situation as optimum during my career. However, unfortunately such things run in cycles in the military. What happens is that you get one military generation that identifies a problem and puts measures in place to the problem. But when they determine the problem is fixed, they pull out the remedy and apply those resources to other problems.

The "fixed" generation retires, but having removed the remedy a new generation comes in off the civilian streets and the problem comes back with them. So the military has to discover and then fix the problem all over again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2016, 08:57 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,611 posts, read 42,768,368 times
Reputation: 57311
I'll share an upbeat story. My son is a GreenBeret. This is the second Christmas he's been in some God forsaken country for Christmas. He left a few months ago, but still, due to some snafu, has been stuck in a country, adjacent to his destination in Africa, doing basically nothing. He says he's very safe, so I like that.

Now the good part. He and his small group are staying at an Air Force camp, with an air conditioned tent, and 3 meals a day. The surgeons there are operating on the residents there and they are letting my son lend a hand with the surgery. He sent us pictures of him helping with orthopedic surgery on a young boy to correct a deformity in his leg. My son is glad to help, and glad to have something to do. We tease him that he is in the Army Surgeon Vocational School.

With all the difficulty and hardships that our military members go through, at least they get to see the world and have experiences that are sometimes good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top