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Old 12-04-2014, 11:54 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,036 posts, read 35,368,297 times
Reputation: 26759

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An interesting post which I thought should also be made a thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by squirrels View Post
There are no US military personnel stationed in Iran. I suggest you read this: CID romance scam information
From the above site:

Quote:
Online Romance Scam Information

Army CID is warning anyone who is involved in online dating to proceed with caution when corresponding with persons claiming to be U.S. Soldiers currently serving in Afghanistan or elsewhere.

Army CID receives hundreds of allegations a month from victims who state they got involved in an online relationship with someone, on a legitimate dating website or other social media website, who claims to be a U.S. Soldier. The "Soldier" then begins asking for money for various false service-related needs such as transportation costs, communication fees, marriage, processing and medical fees. Victims of these online scams have lost tens of thousands of dollars, with a very low possibility of recovery.

The U.S. has established numerous task force organizations to deal with this growing epidemic; unfortunately, many times the people committing these scams are from African countries using untraceable email addresses, routing accounts through numerous locations around the world and utilizing pay per hour Internet cyber cafes, which often times maintain no accountability of use.
Article continues on...
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Old 11-21-2017, 02:50 PM
 
2 posts, read 130 times
Reputation: 10
Default How can you find out if the military person who texts you is the real person/

Recently, someone requested a facebook friendship, when I looked into this person on their facebook they seemed like a legit person so I approved the friendship. They were stationed in Afghanistan, rank CSM, been in the Army for 10 years. I went and looked up the rank and it was a legit rank. He had a sad story about his wife dying in an accident and that he had a little son being raised by his in-laws. To this point, everything seemed okay. He then said he would like to talk to me (mind you this was just a friendship nothing more) he asked me to get an iTunes card for him. I said I wasn't going to do that and I did some more research when I found the warning about the online romance scams and people impersonating a military person. I copied the article and sent it to him and said it sounded like him. I asked him for his email address and he gave me a gmail address, not the .mil address, I knew then that something was not right. In the article, it said how to contact them if I thought this was a scam. So I did that and reported everything I knew. My question is do they check into these scams, do they notify the real person that they've been hacked? Does the government get back to you in any way? I'm very curious about what happens after something has been reported.
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Old Yesterday, 08:10 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
12,013 posts, read 5,509,612 times
Reputation: 5384
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamminjoi View Post
Recently, someone requested a facebook friendship, when I looked into this person on their facebook they seemed like a legit person so I approved the friendship. They were stationed in Afghanistan, rank CSM, been in the Army for 10 years. I went and looked up the rank and it was a legit rank. He had a sad story about his wife dying in an accident and that he had a little son being raised by his in-laws. To this point, everything seemed okay. He then said he would like to talk to me (mind you this was just a friendship nothing more) he asked me to get an iTunes card for him. I said I wasn't going to do that and I did some more research when I found the warning about the online romance scams and people impersonating a military person. I copied the article and sent it to him and said it sounded like him. I asked him for his email address and he gave me a gmail address, not the .mil address, I knew then that something was not right. In the article, it said how to contact them if I thought this was a scam. So I did that and reported everything I knew. My question is do they check into these scams, do they notify the real person that they've been hacked? Does the government get back to you in any way? I'm very curious about what happens after something has been reported.
The first red flag I'd see was a CSM (E-9) at 10 years... impossible in today's Army.

There have been a number of internet scams circulating for years referencing a real soldier, airman, sailor or Marine. Sucks to be that poor person, one captain from Fort Bragg was cited in numerous scams as being in Iraq, needed $10K to get a stash of gold out of the country, can you help, I'll share the wealth, I really love you, etc... The writer of the emails had probably just seen Three Kings. In any case, he was notified by both the Army and on social media. "Hey, dude, you know you're in Iraq and not North Carolina? How'd you get downrange so fast? We were just playing hoops this afternoon!"

There is, as Poncho notes in the OP article, very little that can be done when the emails and scams originate in 3rd World anarchic states.


Part of the problem stems from online profiles which read "1st Lt Joe Bagodonuts, currently deployed to Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan" which are shared freely and then used as the basis to fabricate scams. Takeaway (which is continually emphasized but with varying effect): Do not post and share too much online.
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Old Yesterday, 08:22 AM
 
2,160 posts, read 873,935 times
Reputation: 5783
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamminjoi View Post
Recently, someone requested a facebook friendship, when I looked into this person on their facebook they seemed like a legit person so I approved the friendship. They were stationed in Afghanistan, rank CSM, been in the Army for 10 years. I went and looked up the rank and it was a legit rank. He had a sad story about his wife dying in an accident and that he had a little son being raised by his in-laws. To this point, everything seemed okay. He then said he would like to talk to me (mind you this was just a friendship nothing more) he asked me to get an iTunes card for him. I said I wasn't going to do that and I did some more research when I found the warning about the online romance scams and people impersonating a military person. I copied the article and sent it to him and said it sounded like him. I asked him for his email address and he gave me a gmail address, not the .mil address, I knew then that something was not right. In the article, it said how to contact them if I thought this was a scam. So I did that and reported everything I knew. My question is do they check into these scams, do they notify the real person that they've been hacked? Does the government get back to you in any way? I'm very curious about what happens after something has been reported.

"Everything seemed ok?"

Nope.
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Old Yesterday, 12:23 PM
 
2 posts, read 130 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you. How long does it take to reach CSM and what are their duties? If someone is on facebook and it lists they are US Army is there any way to look up through the Army to find this person? Or to find if they are actually in the Army? I'm curious and it makes me angry that these imposters do these kinds of things.
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Old Yesterday, 01:31 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,036 posts, read 35,368,297 times
Reputation: 26759
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamminjoi View Post
Thank you. How long does it take to reach CSM and what are their duties? If someone is on facebook and it lists they are US Army is there any way to look up through the Army to find this person? Or to find if they are actually in the Army? I'm curious and it makes me angry that these imposters do these kinds of things.
Out of 1,055,972 Enlisted military personnel for all U.S. branches there are 10,607 in pay grades E-9. About one out of a hundred reach the E-9 pay grade... Look at the charts here:
https://www.infoplease.com/us/milita...military-ranks

I did not find the Army statistics...
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Old Today, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,122 posts, read 3,725,776 times
Reputation: 4856
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamminjoi View Post
Thank you. How long does it take to reach CSM and what are their duties? If someone is on facebook and it lists they are US Army is there any way to look up through the Army to find this person? Or to find if they are actually in the Army? I'm curious and it makes me angry that these imposters do these kinds of things.
On average, however, one can expect to be promoted with the following time-in-service (2001 statistics):


Private*(E-2) - 6 months
Private First Class*(E-3) - 1 year
Specialist/Corporal*(E-4) - 18 months
Sergeant*(E-5) - 4.2 years
Staff Sergeant*(E-6) - 8.5 years
Sergeant First Class*(E-7) - 13.6 years
Master Sergeant/First Sergeant*(E-8) - 17 years
Sergeant Major*(E-9) - 20.8 years

However your question is on the CSM. Well you could possibly be a CSM in 9 years but no one does that anymore. A person would have to be extraordinary and well connected. Possibly have some compromising pictures of the Secretary of Defense ?

Then to be a CSM the same as a Sergeant Major with command responsibilities of a larger unit than a company. This is Battalion sized or better and have over 300 soldiers in the command to be responsible for. That is a whole other story. You need to be in the top three or four and you "WILL" interview for the job with your boss.
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