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Old 02-06-2015, 06:44 PM
 
7,724 posts, read 4,854,651 times
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I think they're all too easy. I think that's why so many troops are cracking in combat. Make 'em crack in basic and keep the weak ones off the battlefield. But anyway, I think the AF TIs try to be tough and don't really understand the purpose of being tough. In the Corps, the DIs were rebuilding men into Marines and, if Marines were ever captured, they could survive and possibly escape. That's the level of intensity the Marines went through. But now the DIs can't even let the brim of their hat touch the recruit, which used to be a big intimidating technique. Cuz ya better not flinch!

I think that's why the AF has problems with new troops having attitudes. There's no real purpose to the intimidation. And they know it. IMO

9yrs active USMC, 20yrs AF Guard, spent lots of time on AF bases.
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:08 PM
 
Location: United States of America
1,718 posts, read 2,034,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
I think they're all too easy. I think that's why so many troops are cracking in combat. Make 'em crack in basic and keep the weak ones off the battlefield. But anyway, I think the AF TIs try to be tough and don't really understand the purpose of being tough. In the Corps, the DIs were rebuilding men into Marines and, if Marines were ever captured, they could survive and possibly escape. That's the level of intensity the Marines went through. But now the DIs can't even let the brim of their hat touch the recruit, which used to be a big intimidating technique. Cuz ya better not flinch!

I think that's why the AF has problems with new troops having attitudes. There's no real purpose to the intimidation. And they know it. IMO

9yrs active USMC, 20yrs AF Guard, spent lots of time on AF bases.
I agree 100%. Me.....USMCR Boot camp at Parris Island, SC. 1964. Semper fi.
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:15 PM
 
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they have both females & males going through the same obstacle course at the same time, so it must be pretty easy if they train along side with the ladies like that
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Old 02-08-2015, 05:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
they have both females & males going through the same obstacle course at the same time, so it must be pretty easy if they train along side with the ladies like that
I agree. Those men will never know their extreme limits because they can't push the group if they have to slow down for the females. I'm sorry but there are very few women who can keep up with the guys and if they can it's because they work night and day to maintain that level of strength. "It's not fair!" HOGWASH
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:13 AM
 
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Basic military training was begun on March 2, 1970; BMTS 3724, Flight 224; SSgt Kirk was the Training Instructor (TI); along with his second, Sgt. Lewis.

It is remembered that SSgt Kirk looked to be the perfect illustration of a TI; in both appearance and bearing; and, it is believed that is what garnered SSgt Kirk a great deal of universally recognized respect in the Flight.

We started out with 50 guys in Flight 224; the names of each were listed; from top to bottom; in alphabetical order; on two sheets of paper; 25 names on each sheet.

These two sheets were scotch-taped at eye level; one above the other; next to the outer door, just inside the barracks (the new barracks).

Every time a man was taken from Flight 224 prior to graduation; never to return; for, whatever reason; his name would be, literally, "red-lined".

At the end of Basic Training, 20 names had been red-lined on those two sheets of paper; scotch-taped by the door; and, we only graduated with 30 guys in Flight 224.

During Basic Training in Flight 224; SSgt Kirk was never seen to lose his temper. At the beginning of Basic he told us all what would be expected of us; what we were to do; what we would need to learn; and, all of this in a straightforward, matter-of-fact way.

My first impression was that I would do anything for this guy; and, that must have been the general consensus; because everyone of us just "snapped to" whenever he gave an order.

Sgt. Lewis, always equally sharp in appearance and bearing, was just as equally respected.

I never heard either one of them yell at anyone. Neither did they ever tell a joke; or, try to be funny; or, fraternize in the least.

Everything was always straightforward and business; like you had better hurry because you were packing for a trip and the train was leaving; so, "be on it".

We just all worked together; as every day in basic was always full with enough other timely preoccupations and scheduling deadlines.

Oddly, in thinking about it, I never heard anybody "*****". We were all too tired at the end of a day; and, just wanted to sleep so that the next day could be hit hard. We just wanted to move on and get it all over with.

Notaby; it wasn't understood how we lost so many men by the end of Basic Training.

But, we weren't supposed to know.

One by one, they just disappeared.

Only one incident was personally known.

One night, when on "dorm guard" at 2AM in the morning; one of our number, the fastest runner; with, by far, the most physical endurance of any man in our Flight; got out of his bunk, in his underwear, and approached me by the outer door.

Naturally, I was thrilled at have company; someone to talk to. But as he approached, it was noticed that he had a chillingly terrifying look to him.

He walked up to me close and said, "There's cameras in the ceiling (!), There's cameras in the ceiling (!)"; with a dubious look on his mug; which, at the time; was believed to comically feign insanity.

Thinking this a joke, I laughed; and, was trying to think of a snappy comeback; happy, in fact, with this timely diversion; when this Airman Basic; instantly; pushed me aside; opened the door; and, exited the building in his white underwear; destination unknown.

He was never heard from again; and, his name; like 19 others; had a red line drawn through it.

It was astounding; because, basic training hadn't been anything like the horror stories one often, legitimately, hears; not in Flight 224. We just all worked together; we were volunteers; and, wanted to be in the United States Air Force.

Strangely; this guy who had bolted; as far as was known; had been a good troop.

When our group photo of BMTS 3724, Flt. 224, is looked at; we all look sharp; we all look like military men who can be depended on.

We look, in that picture, like we were all proud of who we were at that time 47 years ago; proud and hopeful.

We all look like we could tackle anything; go ahead; just aim us at it.

When one considers that in 1970; at the height of the Vietnam War; because we had volunteered for the military; there was a large segment of the American population that thought armed forces personnel like us were the lowest-of-the-low.

Ironically paralleling this; at the time of the Flight photo; we were all no-stripers; slick-sleeves; we had no rank in the American military.

We were the lowest of the low, literally, in that particular segment of society, too.

In both worlds, there was no one lower than us.

We, in our uniforms, could be ordered into the heat of battle; prisoners could not.

Yet, there we were in our pressed fatigues; with our shirts tucked in; and, with our combat web belts on.

Our pay was about $100 a month; about $25.00 a week; or, about $5.00 a day; if, you figure a five-day work-week.

But, I'll tell you, we look like we had accomplished something in that photo; something worthwhile; for what we knew was a Grateful Nation.
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:19 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
416 posts, read 185,026 times
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Basic Training is tailored to the branch. Because the Air Force is so specialized, most of the in depth training takes place once they get into their MOS based training. So they really are only covering the basics.


In the Navy, basic was longer because every Sailor is a firefighter, every Sailor is a paramedic, every Sailor is tasked with damage control. On a ship at sea, there isn't anyone to call for help, you are your own help. If it wasn't for that, Navy basic would be as long as the Air Force.
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Old 03-16-2017, 03:20 PM
 
2,691 posts, read 755,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squirrels View Post
Basic training is pretty much the same across all services. There's differences that focus on each branch, but by and large it's all the same thing. It's just a course intended to teach you the military lifestyle and the basics of how to function in a new environment.

People act like it's a huge competition about who has the hardest time in basic training, but honestly the whole argument is nonsense.
I find it very hard to believe Air Force boot camp and Marine boot camp are........."all the same thing "..
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Old 03-16-2017, 03:33 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
21,957 posts, read 32,196,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
Basic Training is tailored to the branch. Because the Air Force is so specialized, most of the in depth training takes place once they get into their MOS based training. So they really are only covering the basics.


In the Navy, basic was longer because every Sailor is a firefighter, every Sailor is a paramedic, every Sailor is tasked with damage control. On a ship at sea, there isn't anyone to call for help, you are your own help. If it wasn't for that, Navy basic would be as long as the Air Force.

From Length of Basic Training at Military.com


How long depends on your service branch:
Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) lasts nine weeks. This length of time doesn't count time spent in reception, nor does it count the time spent for job training if you attend an OSUT unit, which combines basic training and job training into one combined course.

Air Force basic training is eight weeks, plus one week of in-processing.

Navy basic training is seven weeks, plus one week at the beginning called processing week.

The Marine Corps has the longest basic training, which is 12 weeks, not including 4 days of in-processing.
All of the services typically have additional training after "Basic Training" depending on a variety of factors.
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Duluth, MN
494 posts, read 814,774 times
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Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
I find it very hard to believe Air Force boot camp and Marine boot camp are........."all the same thing "..

Same here. Of course, perhaps that poster has been through all of them...?
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:34 AM
 
188 posts, read 42,741 times
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IMO (since I went through Lackland I can give my opinion on it)


AF Boot camp is not hard physically per say.... there is definitely a lot of running, pushups, "incentive or remedial training" etc... But comparing stories with friends who were in the army or marines I think it's safe to say they had a more physically challenging experience. I was in pretty good shape before I went to boot camp so I don't think it was anything too difficult so take my opinion with that in mind. Although I did witness a fair amount of trainees having difficulty with certain things and struggling to meet standards. It wasn't easy but I think any average person with a little bit of mental toughness could do what they were told and within the time limits. Comparing stories with friends in the Navy they had similar experiences that I did.


mentally, I can honestly say it is not easy. I thought the mental aspect was the hardest. Mentally I think a lot of the boot camps have similar ideas and programs. All the branches boot camp training programs are all heavily influenced by psychologists that design specific methods and training techniques used to mold a group of civilians into a military unit. Blend in each branches unique customs/courtesies/history/culture and expectations and there you have it. They all have many of the same concepts and shared experiences but they do have differences as well. There is nothing mentally easy about boot camp anywhere.
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