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Old 07-09-2015, 06:51 PM
 
Location: san antonio, tx
587 posts, read 761,605 times
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Does anyone know what the rule is about double dipping? I'm finding conflicting information. Last I read, if I understand it correctly, a veteran does NOT have to give up his/her military retirement and in doing so starts the clock for federal retirement at the beginning (???).
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Old 07-09-2015, 07:03 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,032 posts, read 35,344,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorgirl2007 View Post
Does anyone know what the rule is about double dipping? I'm finding conflicting information. Last I read, if I understand it correctly, a veteran does NOT have to give up his/her military retirement and in doing so starts the clock for federal retirement at the beginning (???).
What service?

Enlisted or Officer?

Retired Reserve or Retired Active?

When did they retire?

There aren't loopholes there are regulations and laws...

I can't answer for all of the situations above...

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 07-09-2015 at 07:25 PM..
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Old 07-09-2015, 07:03 PM
 
48,526 posts, read 76,140,463 times
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Lots of veterans double dip ;Police forces are full them.
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Old 07-09-2015, 10:02 PM
 
8,833 posts, read 13,966,095 times
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I am not sure what you are asking. If you are asking if a person can retire from the military and draw a pension, and retire from a government civil service position and draw a pension for that service, the answer is yes.
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Old 07-09-2015, 11:51 PM
 
Location: san antonio, tx
587 posts, read 761,605 times
Reputation: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
What service?

Enlisted or Officer?

Retired Reserve or Retired Active?

When did they retire?

There aren't loopholes there are regulations and laws...

I can't answer for all of the situations above...
Navy
Enlisted
Retired Active
2006

Another guy I know retired as an officer with 30 years of active service and is Civil Service now. The last time we spoke he told me he only needed to stay in Civil Service for I believe 10 years (don't remember the exact number of years, but I know it wasn't that long). He said he could retire and collect retirement from both the military and Civil Service. Might be because of his age after 10 years though.

I'm considering a GS position and have been researching. There's conflicting information on the web. That's why I'm asking if anyone is familiar with how the system works.
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:18 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
12,005 posts, read 5,501,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorgirl2007 View Post
Navy
Enlisted
Retired Active
2006

Another guy I know retired as an officer with 30 years of active service and is Civil Service now. The last time we spoke he told me he only needed to stay in Civil Service for I believe 10 years (don't remember the exact number of years, but I know it wasn't that long). He said he could retire and collect retirement from both the military and Civil Service. Might be because of his age after 10 years though.

I'm considering a GS position and have been researching. There's conflicting information on the web. That's why I'm asking if anyone is familiar with how the system works.
I'm retired military and now a GS as well. In order to fully take advantage of the FERS retirement there's the buy-back option, in which creditable military service can be bought back. The cost depends on the number of years served. My first eligibility for FERS retirement is at 56, but full retirement for me doesn't kick in until 62, and it's all dependent on your federal service start date, which for me started at 22. The longer one works after eligibility, the more the annuity will be afterwards. There's also TSP, a 401K that has some matching federal funds. An advantage of being retired military is already having a medical plan in effect, instead of the federal employees health benefits system.

As an aside, I know of two people, including my late boss, who didn't make it to retirement because they continued to work well after retirement eligibility in order to increase their CSRS (old retirement system) and FERS (new one) annuities. There's a tradeoff between retiring when one can do stuff and retiring when one's too old to work and can't do stuff.
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Old 07-10-2015, 08:14 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,032 posts, read 35,344,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorgirl2007 View Post
Navy
Enlisted
Retired Active
2006
I believe Enlisted personnel from all branches may retire and get a Federal "GS" job without any penalties in any of their pay.

It can get quite complex...
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Old 07-10-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
12,005 posts, read 5,501,181 times
Reputation: 5379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
I believe Enlisted personnel from all branches may retire and get a Federal "GS" job without any penalties in any of their pay.

It can get quite complex...
Additional information: The GS (FERS) annuities and the retired pay are quite separate. No penalties. I don't know how CSRS worked, but that's not applicable to anyone retiring from the military these days.

There are even provisions within the GS force to allow Guardsmen and Reservists 120 hours (15 days) paid time off a year for annual training. Any time outside of that is on the reserve member's time and dime. Now, out here at Fort Sill there was an Air Force retiree who went back in as a Reservist, which takes SecDef approval, and every time he got paid as a Reservist he had to forfeit one or two days of his retired pay, don't remember which it was. He was a contractor with the JFO program so the GS/military issue was not applicable.
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Old 07-10-2015, 11:13 AM
 
Location: san antonio, tx
587 posts, read 761,605 times
Reputation: 822
Very helpful information! Thanks!!
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Old 07-10-2015, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Fort Gordon, GA
498 posts, read 685,262 times
Reputation: 1187
You say double dipping like it's a bad thing.

If you earn two pensions, you deserve two pensions. Why on earth would you have to forfeit one if you want to retire from a different job later down the road?
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