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Old 05-21-2016, 05:06 PM
 
3,299 posts, read 1,310,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SocalPitgal View Post
I do not know. I do know he is having a hard time with trigonometry. This is why he still has not gone and taken his test yet.
Best of luck to him. I'm reasonably sure the recruiter will encourage him to consider some other ratings as well.
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Old 05-21-2016, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Texas
113 posts, read 64,098 times
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A fellow I know who graduated in the top ten percent of his HS class was a 'nuke' who studied hard and he said the training and education the Navy gives you for this job is very, very intense. If your son can't maintain a high level of focus for an extended period he might want to rethink this because my understanding from the guy I know is that if you wash out you go into a 'pool' of people to be given a job the Navy has open at the time.

Tell your boy to go with the recruiter's recommendation after the testing. Your son is old enough by now to have some perspective about the realities of life and should be a little more pragmatic than an 18 year old just out of high school so I'm sure he will make a good choice for himself.

Write him often with news from home without expecting an answer back every time. Try not to send too much bad news okay? He will be very busy. He will need to know he has someone in his corner for a while because I've heard Navy Boot Camp can be an eye-opener. I wasn't in the Navy but at the time I was in the service Basic Training sure woke me up! Anyway just be a typical Mom and you'll hold up your end just fine. Good Luck to your son! He won't regret the military, I can guarantee you that. Any branch of the military will put you light years ahead of your peers if you take advantage of it and keep your head on straight.
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Old 05-22-2016, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Currently in CT but have recently started construction for our retirement home in NH
215 posts, read 139,277 times
Reputation: 464
The Nuclear Power Program is intense and I found it more difficult than any college course I ever took. Mostly because there is a lot of info in a wide range of subjects (chemistry, thermodynamics, nuclear physics, material science, etc) in a relatively short time frame (Nuc School six months followed by six months of hands on prototype training). However, the instructors (as well as your classmates) want you to succeed and will give you every opportunity to make that happen provided you put forth the effort. I was only an average student in school, both high school and some college, mostly because I didn't fully apply myself and did well in the program qualifying as a Reactor Operator. Unlike HS and college the instructors are all over you to work hard and have the authority to keep you working when the normal day and classroom portions are completed. The other thing I notice was that I grew up and quickly understood the importance of doing well, which is something that isn't understood or practiced by most HS/college kids.

Some students do drop out and will be reassigned to complete their enlistment at a duty station elsewhere. However, since they have already had some training prior to nuc school (either as an Electronic Technician, Electrician or Machinist mate) they will most likely be assigned to a ship to fulfill that job function, all of which are usable real world (civilian job) experiences.

My experiences go back between 75-81 so some things have surely changed, but overall I believe the training and demands on the students are similar today. Good luck to him and should you have any specific questions about what I have identified feel free to PM me.

Lou
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Old 05-23-2016, 08:25 AM
 
104 posts, read 43,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SocalPitgal View Post
He said he wants to work in the Nuclear field, to be a NUKE. I don't think he is the type to study hard enough to get into that field. He is setting his goals high. And in my eyes, unrealistic.
Have you bothered to discuss with your son what's gonna happen to him after he gets out of the Navy? No matter how long he stays in, sooner or later, he's gonna have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Virtually all vets have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Some have such a difficult time that they never readjust.

When he comes out of the military he's gonna be like all vets with the arrogance, hostility, the "I don't care about civilians and their problems" attitude, the "I have emotional problems and get emotional over the smallest things" attitude, the "I've seen things most civilians will never do" uppity behavior, the "it's hard to find purpose in the civilian world because they are so lazy and unmotivated" attitude, and the constant whining about how life in the real world is nothing like life in the military.

What's gonna make it worse is most jobs you do in the military won't transfer to anything in the real world. And even the ones that do are underwhelming.

Back when there was a draft, many of the dudes who were drafted, like in both world wars, they had jobs and careers they were in the midst of pursuing. So they had this "I'm just doing this for the duration of the war and then I'll go back to what I really wanna do" and it was easier for them to readjust. Today's soldiers are volunteers who join to escape a directionless life and crappy job prospects of the real world. They believe the lie about the military will give them an edge when they return to the real world. Then they return, they find out there's no edge above others, and the same directionless life and crappy job prospects are still waiting for them. So it makes readjustment a far greater pain along with all the emotional problems.

So really, OP, has your son taken a deep look at all these vets and their emotional problems readjusting? If not, then spend a lot of time doing so. I wanted to join the Air Force. But encountering so many vets who had a difficult time readjusting, I'm glad I dodged that bullet.
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Old 05-23-2016, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Ohio
5,319 posts, read 3,561,311 times
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My husband joined the Army in 2006. Went to Ft Leonard Wood, then Ft Knoxx. He was NOT allowed to take ANYTHING to basic. Anything he took, they took and DID NOT GIVE BACK. Including paperwork, such as our marriage license.
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Old 05-23-2016, 08:43 AM
 
537 posts, read 213,263 times
Reputation: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Shouts View Post
Have you bothered to discuss with your son what's gonna happen to him after he gets out of the Navy? No matter how long he stays in, sooner or later, he's gonna have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Virtually all vets have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Some have such a difficult time that they never readjust.

When he comes out of the military he's gonna be like all vets with the arrogance, hostility, the "I don't care about civilians and their problems" attitude, the "I have emotional problems and get emotional over the smallest things" attitude, the "I've seen things most civilians will never do" uppity behavior, the "it's hard to find purpose in the civilian world because they are so lazy and unmotivated" attitude, and the constant whining about how life in the real world is nothing like life in the military.

What's gonna make it worse is most jobs you do in the military won't transfer to anything in the real world. And even the ones that do are underwhelming.

Back when there was a draft, many of the dudes who were drafted, like in both world wars, they had jobs and careers they were in the midst of pursuing. So they had this "I'm just doing this for the duration of the war and then I'll go back to what I really wanna do" and it was easier for them to readjust. Today's soldiers are volunteers who join to escape a directionless life and crappy job prospects of the real world. They believe the lie about the military will give them an edge when they return to the real world. Then they return, they find out there's no edge above others, and the same directionless life and crappy job prospects are still waiting for them. So it makes readjustment a far greater pain along with all the emotional problems.

So really, OP, has your son taken a deep look at all these vets and their emotional problems readjusting? If not, then spend a lot of time doing so. I wanted to join the Air Force. But encountering so many vets who had a difficult time readjusting, I'm glad I dodged that bullet.

I have no idea where you get the above from. Virtually all vets having a difficult time readjusting to civilian life? Vets not getting good jobs? Couldn't be further from the truth. While those frequently deployed to combat zones do differ from civilians and take time to adjust, but then again, who wouldn't? When you operate in an environment where every day may be your last, it does change you. You accept that and adjust to that environment. When you come back stateside you adjust again; this may take some time, but most still adjust. There are plenty of service members getting great jobs after they get out. And from my personal experience having had active duty service, was a major plus in my life - never thought of it as something that set me back. I can go on forever about this, but what's the point? Your post is simply not grounded in any sort of reality.
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Old 05-23-2016, 10:11 AM
 
3,299 posts, read 1,310,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Shouts View Post
No matter how long he stays in, sooner or later, he's gonna have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Virtually all vets have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Some have such a difficult time that they never readjust.
Umm, no.
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Old 05-23-2016, 05:35 PM
 
10,140 posts, read 5,147,364 times
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I was a nuke MM.

When I decided to join the Navy, I only did so because a friend said he was going to join after he graduated (I was a year ahead of him). When I approached the recruiter I knew nothing about what I wanted to do in terms of job rating. I took tests at MEPS and one of the people there was telling me all the cool things about becoming a nuke, about how I would get a higher rank out of boot camp and all of that. So I decided to do that.

My high school GPA was something like low 2's, I had a hard time with math and never made it past geometry (which I took 3 times). So I was definitely not good with math.

Yet I made it through power school. I was putting in a lot of hours after classes each night, like 4-5 hours studying (which they had you record). There were also tutors and the instructors were pretty good making the material understandable to even people like me. I felt they wanted you to succeed. I didn't graduate the program with stellar scores or anything, I think after the final exam I had something like a 2.9 GPA or so. But I made it and that's all that mattered.
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Old 05-23-2016, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,234 posts, read 6,639,236 times
Reputation: 5401
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Shouts View Post
Have you bothered to discuss with your son what's gonna happen to him after he gets out of the Navy? No matter how long he stays in, sooner or later, he's gonna have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Virtually all vets have a difficult time readjusting to civilian life. Some have such a difficult time that they never readjust.
This is nonsense. Some vets have trouble but the majority adjust just fine. I spent 26 years in the military and know 1000's of "vets". I don't know any that have had a hard time readjusting to civilian life. Civilian life is much easier and less stressful (for me anyway) and it took very little "readjusting".
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Old 05-23-2016, 09:15 PM
 
10,140 posts, read 5,147,364 times
Reputation: 16196
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBTRS View Post
This is nonsense. Some vets have trouble but the majority adjust just fine. I spent 26 years in the military and know 1000's of "vets". I don't know any that have had a hard time readjusting to civilian life. Civilian life is much easier and less stressful (for me anyway) and it took very little "readjusting".
I had a difficult time readjusting back to civilian life in terms of finding a stable job and taking care of finances.

They did give classes on transitioning back to civilian life but when I look back it was woefully inadequate. I had no degree and no references/network for jobs. It didn't help that I went back to a bad family situation that was already mired in a bad financial situation.

It was only 2 years after I got out of the Navy that I finally found a decent, stable job in an industry I am still in today. And that was only due to the help of a former Navy shipmate who happened to work there and referred me in.
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