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Old 07-08-2016, 11:11 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15

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Good morning everyone. I have a very big problem. I was applying to the national guard, had 59 on the asvab, went to meps, got dq for my vision. I was sent to the meps doc and here is what he wrote down: (20/20#20/70) without correction and both correctable to 20/20. Color vision, night vision etc are good. He also found that my vision has been blurry for so long because i got hurt in the head and he added that there is no sign of disease, just that it remained the same.also he said i have poor response on one of the exam he gave me and that my optic nerve is blade. That is all. So i went back to meps and the chief said he can't let me swear in because the meps doctor found something but he recommeded me for a waiver. My recruiter then took my record and said it is going to take up to 2 weeks. One month later i called him and he said he did not get something yet but he think it is not going to be allowed. 2 weeks later i tried to call him sgain and no response. Then i called his supervisor who said my waiver cannot go forward because they need me to see my own doctor and then submit the result. I went to the army recruiting center to talk to the active duty, snd the recruiter wanted to talk to my recruiter before starting the waiver process. My recruiter told him that my condition is not waiverable. And the army guy said he can't do anything if it is not waivarable. So here is my questions. Can a recruiter say if something is not waiverable even if the meps doctor did not mention any disease? Even those who have degenarative diseases, their condition is still waivarable. Also, if it is true that it is not waivarable, why he submitted the waiver? Why he did not tell me when i was dqd? Why his supervisor asked me to sent him my record after having seen my own doctor? Why his supervisor told me that my waiver cannot go forward without it? I really want to join and my eyes see good. If any branch of the army can open my record it would be good, that way they will see themselves that my condition is very waivarable. Please help me.
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Old 07-08-2016, 11:32 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
The army recruiter told me that he can open my record and see what is written. If it is possible to open my record, i am 100% sure that they wi see anything that cannot be waived. Please if there are recruiters here, tell me if you can open my record, if so you can see that the condition i have is for sure waivarable and i think i can be approved.
Also i got this if it helps.

(-1.75 ; -2.25)
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Old 07-09-2016, 08:54 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,182 posts, read 9,221,015 times
Reputation: 4716
Quote:
Originally Posted by deyamame View Post
Good morning everyone. I have a very big problem. I was applying to the national guard, had 59 on the asvab, went to meps, got dq for my vision. I was sent to the meps doc and here is what he wrote down: (20/20#20/70) without correction and both correctable to 20/20. Color vision, night vision etc are good. He also found that my vision has been blurry for so long because i got hurt in the head and he added that there is no sign of disease, just that it remained the same.also he said i have poor response on one of the exam he gave me and that my optic nerve is blade. That is all. So i went back to meps and the chief said he can't let me swear in because the meps doctor found something but he recommeded me for a waiver. My recruiter then took my record and said it is going to take up to 2 weeks. One month later i called him and he said he did not get something yet but he think it is not going to be allowed. 2 weeks later i tried to call him sgain and no response. Then i called his supervisor who said my waiver cannot go forward because they need me to see my own doctor and then submit the result. I went to the army recruiting center to talk to the active duty, snd the recruiter wanted to talk to my recruiter before starting the waiver process. My recruiter told him that my condition is not waiverable. And the army guy said he can't do anything if it is not waivarable. So here is my questions. Can a recruiter say if something is not waiverable even if the meps doctor did not mention any disease? Even those who have degenarative diseases, their condition is still waivarable. Also, if it is true that it is not waivarable, why he submitted the waiver? Why he did not tell me when i was dqd? Why his supervisor asked me to sent him my record after having seen my own doctor? Why his supervisor told me that my waiver cannot go forward without it? I really want to join and my eyes see good. If any branch of the army can open my record it would be good, that way they will see themselves that my condition is very waivarable. Please help me.
This is a complex process.

The CMO (Chief Medical Officer) at MEPS can disqualify for anything they want, and if they want more info, they can request more info and make you go to the specialists that can provide that info. But, normally they give specific instructions as to what info, such as "Please see an ophthalmologist for optic nerve evaluation." Then, once they have that info, they can send it to the surgeon general for a waiver. The waiver might be denied.

You need to understand what info they're looking for, or you could go to an ophthalmologist and have a complete evaluation and get that submitted to MEPS.

NO, your recruiter is NOT a doctor and shouldn't be stopping the waiver from going forward. You have a lazy recruiter. You can try a different branch (Think Navy or Air Force), or you can keep going up the chain to supervisors in the Army until you find one to help.

My guess it is something with your optic nerve, but your optic nerve can't be "blade" that's not a condition... I think you misunderstood something.

See page 11 of this regulation for all the rules on eyes when it comes to joining.
http://dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/613003p.pdf

Good luck.
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Old 07-09-2016, 10:21 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
Thank you for your response. I will talk to another branch.
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Old 07-09-2016, 10:33 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
Sorry for the writtin the meps doc said i have a pale optic nerve. And that what i want to show. It is not a condition. I have scheduled an appointment with an ophtalmologist to find out what i really have. I never did an eye exam before, so it was the first time at meps. I will talk to the navy or air force but i afraid that the recruiter could call mine i actually have, and this one tell him the same think that my condition is not waivarable. I do not even know what condition he talks. Even the meps doc does not know.
Thanks. If you are a recruiter, i can contact you via email or something to give you my information. And you can look at my records and you will see that there is nothing bad that has been said on me. And really i regret the fact that i put my confidence on that recruiter.
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,182 posts, read 9,221,015 times
Reputation: 4716
The regulation I posted above says "(2) Any optic nerve anomaly." is a disqualification. Hopefully you can get it waived.

I am a recruiter, but I can't look at your records without a signature of release form so you'd need to find a local recruiter.

I do not think you will be able to get a waiver. I've just spend some time researching pale optic nerve. Have you googled it? It's actually fairly serious and indicates that your optic nerve is starting to atrophy and die, and can result in a loss of vision. You should get to a eye doctor because they may be able to slow the process down before you have major eye issues. You've stated you have blurry vision, that's actually one of the main symptoms of pale optic nerve, as your vision becomes blurry due to the damage of the optic nerve. So, he saw the damage on your optic nerve AND you have symptoms... I think you will need to find an alternative career path to the military.

If you actually have a pale optic nerve, it will not be waived, not considering how serious this condition is. If your eye doctor says you do NOT actually have a pale optic nerve, you should be fine to get a waiver.

Please see an eye doctor as fast as possible so they can be sure if your optic nerve is dying... they may be able to save your vision if you seek treatment. This condition can be caused by a tumor or vitamin deficiency, or even glaucoma, a lot of things that are treatable and can prevent further damage. GET TO AN EYE DOCTOR!!!
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:52 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,182 posts, read 9,221,015 times
Reputation: 4716
Also, a head injury should not cause prolonged vision issues. Not at all. You've probably had optic nerve issues since your blurry vision started. If it was from a head injury, either you got a TBI (Which is a DQ), or have post-concussive syndrome (which is a DQ), but your vision would have normalized shortly after your injury. It's likely from the optic nerve damage. The MEPS doctor is not an eye doctor, so may have mistakenly not connected the two items.

Please see an eye doctor.
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Old 07-10-2016, 01:10 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
So here is what the chapter 3 says:

3–15. Eyes

The causes for referral to an MEB
are as follows:

AR 40–501 • 14 December 2007/RAR 23 August 2010


a. Active eye disease or any progressive organic disease or degeneration, regardless of the stage of activity, that is

resistant to treatment and affects the distant visual acuity or visual fields so that distant visual acuity does not meet the

standard stated in paragraph 3–16e or the diameter of the field of vision in the better eye is less than 20 degrees.

b. Aphakia, bilateral.

c. Atrophy of the optic nerve due to disease.

d. Glaucoma, if resistant to treatment or affecting visual fields as in a above, or if side effects of required

medication are functionally incapacitating.

e. Degenerations, when vision does not meet the standards of paragraph 3–16e, or when vision is correctable only

by the use of contact lenses or other special corrective devices (telescopic lenses, etc.).

f. Diseases and infections of the eye, when chronic, more than mildly symptomatic, progressive, and resistant to

treatment after a reasonable period. This includes intractable allergic conjunctivitis inadequately controlled by medica-

tions and immunotherapy.

g. Residuals or complications of injury or disease, when progressive or when reduced visual acuity does not meet

the criteria stated in paragraph 3–16e.

h. Unilateral detachment of retina if any of the following exists:

(1) Visual acuity does not meet the standard stated in paragraph 3–16e.

(2) The visual field in the better eye is constricted to less than 20 degrees.

(3) Uncorrectable diplopia exists.

(4) Detachment results from organic progressive disease or new growth, regardless of the condition of the better eye.

i. Bilateral detachment of retina, regardless of etiology or results of corrective surgery.

3–16. Vision

The causes for referral to an MEB are as follows:

a. Aniseikonia, with subjective eye discomfort, neurologic symptoms, sensations of motion sickness and other

gastrointestinal disturbances, functional disturbances and difficulties in form sense, and not corrected by iseikonica

lenses.

b. Binocular diplopia, not correctable by surgery, that is severe, constant, and in a zone less than 20 degrees from

the primary position.

c. Hemianopsia, of any type if bilateral, permanent, and based on an organic defect. Those due to a functional

neurosis and those due to transitory conditions, such as periodic migraine, are not considered to fall below required

standards.

d. Night blindness, of such a degree that the Soldier requires assistance in any travel at night.

e. Visual acuity.

(1) Vision that cannot be corrected with ordinary spectacle lenses (contact lenses or other special corrective devices

(telescopic lenses, and so forth) are unacceptable) to at least: 20/40 in one eye and 20/100 in the other eye, or 20/30 in

one eye and 20/200 in the other eye, or 20/20 in one eye and 20/800 in the other eye, or

(2) An eye has been enucleated.

f. Visual field with bilateral concentric constriction to less than 20 degrees.
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Old 07-10-2016, 01:20 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
As you can see, even in the case i have optic nerve atrophy, it is not due to disease so it can be waived. But i do not have it. I do not have any disease. In fact, the meps doctor said that my blurry vision is NOT progressive, and it is correctable with glasses to 20/20. I have blurry vision since i am 5 and now i am 22, and i still ha e 20/20 L and 20/70 R. For someone who has optic nerve atrophy, it is impossible to have that kind of vision. I know that because i study medical science. So escuse me recruiter, but iam sure i can get a waiver, and i do not want anyone to tell me if i can or not. At meps they wrote "WAIVER RECOMMENDED" on my record. If i cannot get a waiver for that, they should have written it. Also only the surgeons can deny my waiver so, before giving up, i want them to deny my waiver. My recruiter never sent the waiver. I just want to know how i can have it sent. Thank you
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Old 07-10-2016, 01:26 PM
 
17 posts, read 52,118 times
Reputation: 15
Also, if i had TBI or post concusive thing, at the eye refraction i did at the meps doctor, he should have found it. He should have found any anomaly. But he found nothing. Just that blurry vision, and poor response on the test. What i said for the optic nerve, he never said it is blade or pale. That is my words. He just said that i have something that make my vision blurry. And it is located in the back of the eye.
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