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Old 02-26-2017, 07:40 AM
 
7,364 posts, read 5,647,674 times
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I went in to go nuclear machinist mate. Made it through the first school but not the second. Entering the fleet as an MM gave me the skills to do my current job of working in a hospital boiler room working with the entire hospital's heating and cooling system (HVAC), medical gas systems, fire suppression systems, and emergency generators. Most of our shift is one person working alone so we have to think fast on our feet and be responsible self starters able to work with no supervision.

Two options for your son. The first is to talk with a Naval Officer recruiter. If your son gets a college degree and enlist for a minimum of six years (last time I was in), his college debt is paid. There's more to it than that but talk to an officer recruiter for more details.
The second option is what my wife's nephew did. First he completed the navy's nuclear program and served 6 years on an aircraft carrier. He took college courses while at sea. Upon discharge he enrolled in college majoring in engineering using the credits he was able to transfer from machinistmate A school and the courses he took on the ship as well as his GI Bill. He's making good money, is married, and has two kids. Now, if he didn't go to college, today he could transfer his GI bill to one of his kids for college. This wasn't available when I joined so I wasn't able to transfer it to my daughter.

Navy ships aren't the combat danger they were like in WW2. Being nuclear means you're no where near the flight deck. It also means additional pay above others because of being nuclear. Don't know what it is now, but in 1990 if I had made it through the program I would have gotten about $3,000 bonus. If I reenlisted then I could have gotten about $30,000 bonus but even that could have changed by the time reenlisting came around.

If he wants to see the world, he's not going to want a submarine. Surface ships see the world.
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Old 02-26-2017, 08:57 AM
 
1,172 posts, read 2,168,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by functionofx View Post
Yesterday a Navy recruiter approached my 16 year old son. He is a straight A student, and scored extremely high on the ASVAB also was the highest score in his high school on the PSAT. He takes mostly honors courses, is familiar with statistics, calculus, power series and what not.

My hope was to find a college that interested him, but the Navy is influencing him at school. The recruiter specifically mentioned submarines. He told my son he would be an officer (it occurs to me petty officer is non-commissioned), he also mentioned nuclear submarine (but to the best of my understanding all modern US submarines are nuclear).

He is about 6'1" and may go to 6'2". He loves Internet, particularly online games. He doesn't respond well to nonsensical directions.

Does anyone have experience on a US submarine that can help me understand and relay to my child what is being offered. At some point, it would be nice to meet this recruiter.
Just remember the pesky thing about the spoken word. It doesn't matter when there is a written agreement.

The recruiter can promise your son an officership, a mansion and a yacht. And then when you join you get a scraper and a brush.
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Old 02-26-2017, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,192 posts, read 42,328,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponytrekker View Post
Just remember the pesky thing about the spoken word. It doesn't matter when there is a written agreement.

The recruiter can promise your son an officership, a mansion and a yacht. And then when you join you get a scraper and a brush.
Every enlisted sailor will scrape paint and apply paint.

A recruiter can promise you a long list of things, and you might get all of those things, and you will still scrape paint.

All promises are contingent on the servicemember successfully completing the required schools.
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Old 02-26-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
22,353 posts, read 33,295,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Every enlisted sailor will scrape paint and apply paint.

A recruiter can promise you a long list of things, and you might get all of those things, and you will still scrape paint.

All promises are contingent on the servicemember successfully completing the required schools.
And 99% of the enlisted Army jobs include the phrase "And other duties as assigned"...
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Old 02-26-2017, 02:00 PM
 
9,770 posts, read 9,589,928 times
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Yes, when getting to the fleet, people are generally assigned to deck div and are off chipping and painting. I do not recall nukes on deck div, but I think they had their own thing going in the engine room that is the equivalent, but they have their own thing because they get the nubs up and going on the extensive amount of qualifications they have to do.

There is also cranking, where the nubs will assist the galley, which amounts to cleaning dishes and cleaning the galley. A person has to serve so many days of it. I know there were nukes doing it, but I do not recall all of them doing it, maybe just the MMs? Nukes have generally such an intensive job and qualification process, it is like their own little world back there.
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Old 02-26-2017, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Middle America
32,147 posts, read 32,470,270 times
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Military recruiters being at high schools, job fairs, education/training fairs, etc. is no different than college admissions counselors and trade school reps being at the same things. They're all there to advertise what their institution has to offer and to drum up interest.
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Old 02-26-2017, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Finland
23,062 posts, read 13,692,113 times
Reputation: 10017
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
Well, I think it's a good deal-but it's complicated. Let me be blunt: how many wars has Finland been in, in the last 50 years or so? Ones where you can get yourself blown up, or limbs amputated?

Now ask the same about America. Joining our military does bring a bit of danger.
One: Afghanistan.

I'm not trivialising death or the possible danger or anything, but there's not a huge possibility to be KIA, MIA or WIA in the US Armed Forces either. A fraction of the troops see combat.

I only asked what benefits one might get. There seems to be quite a negative vibe for military service, and I wondered if it really is, especially for someone with not-so-good grades.
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Old 02-26-2017, 05:35 PM
 
3,139 posts, read 1,027,155 times
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I'd be careful. Some military recruiters will exaggerate or lie about opportunities available in the military. I am not sure how he could guarantee a 16 year old kid that he would become an officer if he joined.
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Old 02-26-2017, 06:29 PM
 
9,770 posts, read 9,589,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tassity22 View Post
I'd be careful. Some military recruiters will exaggerate or lie about opportunities available in the military. I am not sure how he could guarantee a 16 year old kid that he would become an officer if he joined.
The recruiter probably stated about automatically becoming an e4 or 5 (e4 starts petty officer) upon completion of the nuke pipeline. The pipeline is long enough to meet the time-in-grade requirements for e4 or 5, depending on rate, and part of the deal for attracting candidates. The Navy essentially pegs the advancement rate at 100%. It was not uncommon to see nukes hit e6 before their first enlistment (6 year) was up.
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Old 02-26-2017, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Midland, MI
403 posts, read 348,830 times
Reputation: 761
I know a couple of people who entered the Army (which I know may be very different from the Navy and how it recruits) and they joined for a specific type of program. Afterwards none of the programs they were interested in materialized. At that point there was no recourse.
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