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Old 04-15-2017, 04:38 PM
 
113 posts, read 30,819 times
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I wanted to go into the military but was disqualified for a number of medical issues. In the civilian world, said issues don't really affect my life much, and I don't think they would have held me back in the military, either. But I still wasn't able to get a waiver because there were too many minor issues for them to be comfortable with. I was bummed for about a decade. Not continuously, naturally, but I spent a lot of time thinking about what path my life could have taken. Oh well. You might as well try to get a waiver, but if you can't... you can't. Find something you CAN do in life that will bring you satisfaction. If it makes you feel better, I know how you feel, kind of.

ETA: There are also ways for civilians to support the military mission. You can work with the VA system, or work as some sort of contractor. Or you can find a similar culture within the civilian world - law enforcement or criminal justice, maybe. Or else you can find something that would be similar to whatever job you wanted. Figure out what part of the military lifestyle you really wanted, and see how you can translate that to the civilian world.
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Old 04-15-2017, 04:41 PM
 
113 posts, read 30,819 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by theoldnorthstate View Post

And a weak link can kill your buddies.
I did find a lot of truth in this. "Army of One" slogans aside, the military is nothing if not sacrificing the comfort of the individual for the mission of the group. That includes sacrificing your own personal life satisfaction goals for the sake of, well, keeping up the standards of the military, and ensuring that the ones serving are surrounded by the best fellow candidates possible.

Doesn't make it sting any less to know you're not invited to the club, but at least there's a higher purpose to the DQ's.
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Old 04-15-2017, 07:05 PM
 
14 posts, read 3,391 times
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@Emeraldmist, I'm glad that someone whose been through the process can relate to my post. You've been there and experienced a similar situation. Its not a feeling that's going to go away within a day or even a week. It really sucks that you couldn't get the waiver. Thanks for the kind words I appreciate it.
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Old 04-15-2017, 07:54 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,815 posts, read 7,871,947 times
Reputation: 3786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Anonymous View Post
The varicose veins is something I've had for as a long as I can remember. While doing the exercises, the physician took one look at me, and said she needed to talk to me. She then told me the varicose veins are a disqualifying marker, and to sign the paper to permanently disqualify me from that branch. My feet were hurting due to the fact they had me doing it all morning. Maybe its because I was in that position for so long. I reached out to another recruiter who is working with me at the moment. However, I started the process mid February, and I haven't been to MEPS as yet. I'm just going to have patience, and keep a positive mind. Thanks for the information.
I don't want to sound rude, but if you were in pain from doing a MEPS physical and standing for awhile,t hen how are you going to handle standing at attention for hours? You can't shift your weight, move your feet, itch your nose, or even shrug your shoulders. You'll have to stand, heels together, perfectly still, not even moving your eyeballs, for hours in basic training and other events like changes of command. This is why you were disqualified.

What if you have to march for miles in training or combat? How can you do that if a MEPS physical left you in pain?

I'm sorry, but if you're truly symptomatic from having to sit/stand at MEPS, this wouldn't be a good move for you to make. I do with you the best of luck though!
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Old 04-15-2017, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,892 posts, read 3,330,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Anonymous View Post
I was hoping to join the military, and make it a career. Its always been an ambition of mine. Especially, since I obtained my bachelors degree, it seemed possible. I'm just a girl with big dreams wanting to be apart of something bigger than myself. Am I wrong for wanting this?
You have never spent a day in uniform and already knew you wanted to make it a career? The military grinds you mentally, physically and emotionally. I'm a firm believer that those who have served age quicker than those in a less stressful profession.

You can be a part of something as there are other options: church, clubs, sorority, etc... I also believe that those who have seen combat together have a bond that is tighter than that of spouses.

The Army has been good to me. I made some good money, met a lot of great people, learned leadership skills that I would've never learned, got my bachelors and masters degrees paid for. But not every "gets" to serve.

Your recruiter probably saw the low test scores, medical issue and decided that there are other recruits who he could get in much easier than you with less work. They have to meet a mission and they're going to go with the higher odds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LBTRS View Post
You need to understand, the military for the most part is a LOT like your experience trying to join. You often times have very little say, you don't have a lot of time to plan, things happen at the last minute, you wait forever, people are not always kind, you don't always know/understand what is going on around you, people don't have a lot of sympathy for those that are easily offended/hurt, people are expecting you to be able to take care of yourself and not need hand holding, there are lots of "NO" answers that you don't fully understand, etc.

You need to be able to roll with the punches in the military and not get off track when things don't go perfectly. Based off of your posts in this thread you really need to evaluate if the military is right for you.
Tons of truth and great advice there.

I think OP needs to realize that type of treatment is necessary in order to maintain an organization that is ready for war.
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Old 04-15-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,197 posts, read 6,533,175 times
Reputation: 5349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Anonymous View Post
@Emeraldmist, I'm glad that someone whose been through the process can relate to my post. You've been there and experienced a similar situation. Its not a feeling that's going to go away within a day or even a week. It really sucks that you couldn't get the waiver. Thanks for the kind words I appreciate it.
I have news for you...most of us that are giving you advice have "been through the process and can relate to your post". The problem is, you're not listening to us when we tell you that what you went through is normal in the military and you're going to have to deal with much worse and harder situations if you were to get in.

The military is HARD and there is very little consideration given to individual feelings. Everyone is treated the same and communication is blunt and direct. There is not a lot of room in the military for individual feelings and making everyone feel comfortable and safe.

The people that will thrive in the military are those that can roll with the punches, take an ass chewing, be given an order from the one that just chewed your ass and respond with "roger that" and carry out the orders you were given. More than likely you'll be under a ton of stress at all times and the military is going to carry on around you without caring much about the stress you're under or the feelings you have about a situation.

If you're a person that dwells on a negative situation for more than about 10 minutes you're going to have a very hard time in the military. 75% of your time in the military will be in negative situations where you are not loving what is going on around you. The other 25% of the time will be bearable with maybe a few good times (or what you interpret as good times at that moment) thrown in.

Any "physical" requirements you went through at MEPS are NOTHING compared to what you're going to face in basic training. You'll spend hours and hours on your feet and in physically demanding situations. The difference will be that you'll be a Soldier and no longer a civilian so you'll have someone yelling and cursing at you when you screw up instead of a nice doctor pulling you aside to "talk".
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:11 PM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,247,470 times
Reputation: 4997
If he is trying this hard to get in then let him try. I say go thru the process until you get a hell no and go from there. I'm sure everyone has seen screw ups in the service who got in without a hitch and didn't appreciate the opportunity they were given.
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,197 posts, read 6,533,175 times
Reputation: 5349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caltovegas View Post
If he is trying this hard to get in then let him try. I say go thru the process until you get a hell no and go from there. I'm sure everyone has seen screw ups in the service who got in without a hitch and didn't appreciate the opportunity they were given.
Wanting in when you've never experienced it and being miserable once you're in are two different things. I hope things work out for the OP but I want her to understand that what she has experienced so far, that has her all worked up, is nothing compared to what she will be facing once she is in.

Once she is in it will be too late and no one is going to care about her sensitive feelings and it will be too late for her to do anything about it other than be miserable.
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:29 PM
 
4,670 posts, read 6,351,434 times
Reputation: 4659
If the OP has a degree why not try to enter as an officer?
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Old 04-15-2017, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,197 posts, read 6,533,175 times
Reputation: 5349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spazkat9696 View Post
If the OP has a degree why not try to enter as an officer?
Because she got a 35 on the ASVAB. Based off of that it would be a safe bet that she's not academically qualified for officer programs.
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