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Old 05-02-2017, 06:46 PM
 
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I love these videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLKkXSwMyJk
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Old 05-02-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I appreciate what all of they and you guys do and did.Thank you all!
Amen.... Can you imagine what they WW2 sailors were thinking when they put out to sea?
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Old 05-02-2017, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
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Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
After reading about all the fun the sub guys have, I know why I ended up in the Army.
And after hearing about all the fun the army had I know why I ended up in the Air National Guard! I'd watch army guys jump out of my perfectly good C-130 and all the while I'd be thinking that my flight pay was more than their jump pay and I would be in my nice warm bed in a couple of hours while the they were playing in minus 30 degree weather all night long and then trying to sleep in the snow.
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Old 05-03-2017, 07:05 AM
 
Location: The South
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Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
And after hearing about all the fun the army had I know why I ended up in the Air National Guard! I'd watch army guys jump out of my perfectly good C-130 and all the while I'd be thinking that my flight pay was more than their jump pay and I would be in my nice warm bed in a couple of hours while the they were playing in minus 30 degree weather all night long and then trying to sleep in the snow.
I never had the pleasure of jumping out of a perfectly flying plane, but I did get to participate in the other fun and games you mentioned.
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Old 05-03-2017, 10:59 AM
 
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The most important thing to know about submarines is never, ever let someone know something bothers you. If you do it will be a very long patrol.


I went through escape training in the old "silo" tower in Groton. Before we swam to the top in our Steinke hoods they put us in this chamber and pressurized it to the equivalent of 125(?) feet of sea pressure to see if we could clear our ears. A doctor gave us a talk and told us to raise our hands if we could not clear them or if the pain was too much. It was clear you were done if you raised your hand. As the chamber was being pressurized a fellow sub schooler was telling me how he was an expert diver and this was going to be nothing. Then out of the blue he gets up in a panic and tries like heck to open the chamber door. I figured we were all doomed. The chamber was quickly depressurized and the "expert diver" was escorted away by the Navy divers actually running the show never to be seen again. The rest of us were a bit puzzled but it was explained it was just a simple case of nitrogen narcosis. That did not cure our uneasiness.


During our second attempt to reach "bottom" I had trouble clearing my ears and the pain was severe but I was young and dumb and refused to raise my hand. As chance would have it I got to know the doctor who gave the "speech" and still see him on occasion. I kid him that my ears still hurt as a result of his "motivational" talk


The ride to the top of the "silo" happened so quick its a blur. We entered the bottom through an air lock (?) wearing an inflatable life vest with a hood over your head. As the water pressure lessened during ascent the expanding air in the vest would vent out into the hood. But its important, actually vital, to realize the air in your lungs is expanding too. Holding your breath would probably be a triggering event for your SGLI and a bunch of paper work for the divers in charge of the evolution. So we had to scream "HO HO HO" as we ascended to prevent our lungs from exploding.


When you get to your first boat you kind of realize that, with the exception of having a good story to tell, the training was not very practical.
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Old 05-04-2017, 09:42 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
7,881 posts, read 5,508,203 times
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Originally Posted by Quiettimect View Post
The most important thing to know about submarines is never, ever let someone know something bothers you. If you do it will be a very long patrol.


I went through escape training in the old "silo" tower in Groton. Before we swam to the top in our Steinke hoods they put us in this chamber and pressurized it to the equivalent of 125(?) feet of sea pressure to see if we could clear our ears. A doctor gave us a talk and told us to raise our hands if we could not clear them or if the pain was too much. It was clear you were done if you raised your hand. As the chamber was being pressurized a fellow sub schooler was telling me how he was an expert diver and this was going to be nothing. Then out of the blue he gets up in a panic and tries like heck to open the chamber door. I figured we were all doomed. The chamber was quickly depressurized and the "expert diver" was escorted away by the Navy divers actually running the show never to be seen again. The rest of us were a bit puzzled but it was explained it was just a simple case of nitrogen narcosis. That did not cure our uneasiness.


During our second attempt to reach "bottom" I had trouble clearing my ears and the pain was severe but I was young and dumb and refused to raise my hand. As chance would have it I got to know the doctor who gave the "speech" and still see him on occasion. I kid him that my ears still hurt as a result of his "motivational" talk


The ride to the top of the "silo" happened so quick its a blur. We entered the bottom through an air lock (?) wearing an inflatable life vest with a hood over your head. As the water pressure lessened during ascent the expanding air in the vest would vent out into the hood. But its important, actually vital, to realize the air in your lungs is expanding too. Holding your breath would probably be a triggering event for your SGLI and a bunch of paper work for the divers in charge of the evolution. So we had to scream "HO HO HO" as we ascended to prevent our lungs from exploding.


When you get to your first boat you kind of realize that, with the exception of having a good story to tell, the training was not very practical.
I have heard the tale before. Like a lot of people, I consider the whole thing to be a nightmare. Not sure I could have done it at all, and I am a good swimmer.
I did well when we were tear gassed in Boot Camp, though.

My Buddy, The Nuke, had explained to me the importance of #1 - NEVER - EVER let people know they are getting to you.
Make like a duck - calm and cool on surface; paddling like hell underneath.
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Old 05-04-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quiettimect View Post
The most important thing to know about submarines is never, ever let someone know something bothers you. If you do it will be a very long patrol.
A long patrol? Submariners may do 3 or 4 years on one boat, rotate to another boat and see you again 10 years later and still try to push the same buttons.

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Old 05-04-2017, 11:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
A long patrol? Submariners may do 3 or 4 years on one boat, rotate to another boat and see you again 10 years later and still try to push the same buttons.

Ha, that's funny. Actually I still live relatively close to NLON and still see people from the old days, even some from the 633.


We are still pushing the same buttons some 30 years later


Have a terpin hydrate on the rocks on me and relive the days of patrol on a non-subsafe boat
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Old 05-04-2017, 12:34 PM
 
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There was a good amount of hazing on the boats back in the day. I assume that is all now forbidden.


It ran from the annoying (mail buoy watch), to the humiliating (Bluenose/Shellback ceremony), to the painful (tacking on dolphins). At my age I remember these events as fond, nostalgic memories. Its hard for me to decide if it was a good thing or a negative thing in the scheme of things. But I'm sure one would end up in prison today for these pranks.


In any event if you end up on a boat don't let anyone trick you into putting yours thumbs into a vise. No good will come from it I promise you.
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Old 05-04-2017, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,584 posts, read 43,244,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quiettimect View Post
Ha, that's funny. Actually I still live relatively close to NLON and still see people from the old days, even some from the 633.


We are still pushing the same buttons some 30 years later


Have a terpin hydrate on the rocks on me and relive the days of patrol on a non-subsafe boat
I decommed the 633.
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