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Old 05-07-2017, 05:54 PM
 
4,148 posts, read 1,983,125 times
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Thanks for sharing your stories and information. Good reading.
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Old 05-13-2017, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Southwest
1,265 posts, read 709,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Nukes as in the engine room folks? Or jsut those who serve on nuke subs in general?

Those who serve on nuke subs in general.
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Old 05-14-2017, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,072 posts, read 44,153,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curiousgeorge5 View Post
Is a nuke submarine career enriching and fulfilling overall?

The simulated emergencies and mock battles must be exciting.
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Nukes as in the engine room folks? Or jsut those who serve on nuke subs in general?
'nucs' [meaning Nuclear Power trained professionals subject to 'Pro-pay'] can be terribly boring.

There is a massive library of tech manuals, each engineering technician is expected to commit to memory vast portions of those manuals. Much of their downtime is spent reading manuals.

Every Engineering evolution has a 'pre-evolution briefing' where watch-standers recite the procedures, by rote, while others follow along in the books for verification.

After each evolution, there are 'post-evolution briefings' where watch-standers are critiqued about their compliance to procedure.

I worked in Navigation and not Engineering. The Navigation Department Head is called 'Nav'.

Nuclear Power officers compete against each other as they vie for advancement to Eng [the Department Head of Engineering].

On my last two boats, we had Navs who were former Engs competing for the XO slot.

They expected us to function in the same method as how engineers do things. That was painful. Officers who enter the Navy focused on becoming a Nav were generally Physicists and better able to have a conversation with. At least in the context of Gravitational vortexes and their effects on inertial platform components.

Overall it gives a good insight into President Carter's administration and why his background seemed to have crippled his cabinet.
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Old 05-14-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
5,009 posts, read 7,252,010 times
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I just listened to a great audiobook titled "The war below" by James Scott. Very interesting historical account of the submarine war in the pacific during world war two. I listen to an average of two books per month and this book held my interest from start to finish much more so than others.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:06 AM
 
335 posts, read 229,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
I just listened to a great audiobook titled "The war below" by James Scott. Very interesting historical account of the submarine war in the pacific during world war two. I listen to an average of two books per month and this book held my interest from start to finish much more so than others.
Sorry I took so long to answer this but I was looking for a broom to sweep baffles.




That was a good book. Submariners are generally a self-effacing group of people but it should be noted that the U.S. Submarine Force consisted of approximately 32,000 officers and men during WW2. Of that number about 6,000 perished on the boats. On the plus side better odds than a kamikaze pilot.


Another good book in that genre is Thunder Below by Admiral Fluckey.


Everyone have the best day.
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Old 05-22-2017, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,072 posts, read 44,153,734 times
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On subs they use a 6-week menu plan. All food is planned on such a schedule, and after 6-weeks the menu plan repeats. For a 14 week patrol under water / ice, we rotate through that menu plan 2 and a half times. So we might have lobster once during each 6-week schedule, and tacos 3 times, ribs twice, etc. They serve a complete meal every 6 hours: Breakfast, lunch, dinner, mid-rats. Each cook is up for 2 meals, then goes 'off' while another cook goes 'on' for 2 meals. And whatever cook pulls breakfast on a given day would normally bake a dozen loafs of bread.

A lot of thought and planning goes into each menu plan. On older boats all food is loaded by hand. One can at a time. A 'stores loading party' will take all day and 100 crewmen to load food. On Trident boats it is all loaded during off-crew onto aluminum rack cubes. A crane lowers them in place, none of the crew are really involved [outside of cooks and the chop].

Once we had this young cook who had just completed a school on baking, so he wanted to be a baker. He took his idea to the Supply Officer [called a Chop], who took it to the Chief of the Boat [the Cob] and the Captain. They agreed to let him come off from the usual watch-rotation, if he would bake fresh cinnamon sticky buns for three meals each day [Breakfast, lunch, dinner].

So he got up every 6 hours and baked cinnamon sticky buns for the crew. and the other cooks went into port-starboard watches [12 hours on and 12 hours off] around him to cover for the usual meal preparation.

The crew loved those cinnamon buns. So much so that at every meal, everyone was loading up on his buns.

Now nobody paid any attention but this used up our flour at a much faster rate. So much so that after about 6 weeks we ran out of flour.

Flour seems like a little thing. But most of the meal items require flour. Bread, casseroles, meatloaf, lots of things need flour.

As we went into the second round of the menu plan, they had to shift the menu items to meals that used no flour, mostly more plain meat and veggies.

This meant that we then ate larger portions of meat and veggies.

But that meant that we consumed a lot more of specific things, like beef. At about week 10, we ran out of beef.

So we shifted to rotating between fish and poultry, served with potatoes, carrots, turnips and dehydrated-compressed shelf-stable cabbage. [The Navy gets these 12 oz. tin cans that have cabbages in them. dehydrated-compressed they can fit four heads of cabbage into a tiny can. The cooks can empty a can into a huge bowl and fill the bowl with water, an hour later the heads of cabbage will have absorbed that water and will be full-sized, but wilted.]

Then we ran out of fish. then carrots, then poultry and potatoes. But we never ran out of cabbage or cheese.

There is never a shortage of government cheese.

We opened all spices and condiments, jellies, and peanutbutter. But our doc confiscated the peanutbutter, he said that we needed balanced nutrition so we had a 'ration' of a slice of cheese and a scoop of peanut butter with each meal of cabbage.

We did our last three weeks of that patrol, with a slice of cheese, and a scoop of peanut butter at every meal. along with cabbage soup with tabasco.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
3,853 posts, read 1,855,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
On subs they use a 6-week menu plan. All food is planned on such a schedule, and after 6-weeks the menu plan repeats. For a 14 week patrol under water / ice, we rotate through that menu plan 2 and a half times. So we might have lobster once during each 6-week schedule, and tacos 3 times, ribs twice, etc. They serve a complete meal every 6 hours: Breakfast, lunch, dinner, mid-rats. Each cook is up for 2 meals, then goes 'off' while another cook goes 'on' for 2 meals. And whatever cook pulls breakfast on a given day would normally bake a dozen loafs of bread.

A lot of thought and planning goes into each menu plan. On older boats all food is loaded by hand. One can at a time. A 'stores loading party' will take all day and 100 crewmen to load food. On Trident boats it is all loaded during off-crew onto aluminum rack cubes. A crane lowers them in place, none of the crew are really involved [outside of cooks and the chop].

Once we had this young cook who had just completed a school on baking, so he wanted to be a baker. He took his idea to the Supply Officer [called a Chop], who took it to the Chief of the Boat [the Cob] and the Captain. They agreed to let him come off from the usual watch-rotation, if he would bake fresh cinnamon sticky buns for three meals each day [Breakfast, lunch, dinner].

So he got up every 6 hours and baked cinnamon sticky buns for the crew. and the other cooks went into port-starboard watches [12 hours on and 12 hours off] around him to cover for the usual meal preparation.

The crew loved those cinnamon buns. So much so that at every meal, everyone was loading up on his buns.

Now nobody paid any attention but this used up our flour at a much faster rate. So much so that after about 6 weeks we ran out of flour.

Flour seems like a little thing. But most of the meal items require flour. Bread, casseroles, meatloaf, lots of things need flour.

As we went into the second round of the menu plan, they had to shift the menu items to meals that used no flour, mostly more plain meat and veggies.

This meant that we then ate larger portions of meat and veggies.

But that meant that we consumed a lot more of specific things, like beef. At about week 10, we ran out of beef.

So we shifted to rotating between fish and poultry, served with potatoes, carrots, turnips and dehydrated-compressed shelf-stable cabbage. [The Navy gets these 12 oz. tin cans that have cabbages in them. dehydrated-compressed they can fit four heads of cabbage into a tiny can. The cooks can empty a can into a huge bowl and fill the bowl with water, an hour later the heads of cabbage will have absorbed that water and will be full-sized, but wilted.]

Then we ran out of fish. then carrots, then poultry and potatoes. But we never ran out of cabbage or cheese.

There is never a shortage of government cheese.

We opened all spices and condiments, jellies, and peanutbutter. But our doc confiscated the peanutbutter, he said that we needed balanced nutrition so we had a 'ration' of a slice of cheese and a scoop of peanut butter with each meal of cabbage.

We did our last three weeks of that patrol, with a slice of cheese, and a scoop of peanut butter at every meal. along with cabbage soup with tabasco.
Was anyone disciplined or reprimanded over this? I know I would have enjoyed those cinnamon buns!
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,072 posts, read 44,153,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Was anyone disciplined or reprimanded over this? I know I would have enjoyed those cinnamon buns!
Nobody was reprimanded, it was all done with proper permission.

Patrols after that, had inflated menus so we always had a surplus of food. Which caused another problem when we went into the shipyard a few years later for over-haul.
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Old 05-22-2017, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
12,116 posts, read 39,493,534 times
Reputation: 9318
When you are in a situation like living in a submarine, I would think that good chow would be one of the few pleasures of life, and that at least decent chow would be necessary to good morale.

Sticky buns every meal would be a morale booster, I would have thought that someone would have said, "Yeah, let's do this, and let's get some extra flour, since we will be using more flour..." Of course there are all sorts of more critical things that have to be replenished, so understandable it was missed.

A good story anyway. At least the guy was trying to use his skill to make life better for his shipmates.
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Old 05-23-2017, 03:43 PM
 
2,264 posts, read 1,290,739 times
Reputation: 2244
Thanks again Submariner for another interesting post.

Submarines have always fascinated me, but I could never ever serve in one.

You guys deserve additional benefits.
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