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Old 06-11-2017, 12:56 PM
 
2,089 posts, read 846,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
It's your health. Don't you think the risk of dehydration from a medical condition while performing routine boot camp exercise is worth at least speaking to a doctor?
Agree. The last thing you want during a stressful time is a health issue.

Passing out, dehydration, horrendous blisters = calling attention to yourself.
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Old 06-11-2017, 01:27 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
3,648 posts, read 2,074,551 times
Reputation: 2939
Hmm, if this isn't a life threatening condition, it sounds like you could make do without reporting it. But if it gets you kicked out of boot camp, wouldn't that make it worse all around? Or at the very least, you'll be back to square one?
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Old 06-11-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,869 posts, read 8,287,687 times
Reputation: 3917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost and Confused View Post
You're absolutely right I managed without going to a doctor. I even participated in gym everyday, and it wasn't a big issue. Eventhough my palms sweat I make cards and love to draw. I even did my sisters, friends, and families hair, so I guess its not a big deal. After I complete the process I'm going to go to the doctor, and look into topical medication. Will I be able to take it to basic? Would getting a prescription for it help?
You're not listening. Please. You're going to ********** up and get your recruiter in trouble.

You've already had issues with MEPS due to the no-show because of your ARMY recruiter. You can't go through MEPS, and then go to the doctor. If you do that, you have to disclose ALL the NEW medical information to MEPS, and then REPEAT MEPS. You can't go until AFTER basic training without it causing issues.

If you pass MEPS, sign a contract, and THEN get diagnosed, you'll LOSE YOUR JOB, LOSE YOUR CONTRACT, and have to go through the medical waiver process and start over. No only that, but you'll get your recruiter in trouble.

You have some decisions. You can disclose the period issues and sweating issues, go see 1 million specalists along with your eye consult, and have it all sent up for a medical waiver BEFORE going to MEPS. OR, youc an shut your mouth and wait until AFTER basic training.

If you pass MEPS, and THEN go to the doctor before leaving for basic, they will shred your contract, discarge you from the delayed entry program, and make you restart your entire medical process. Once you pass MEPS, any medical changes invalidates MEPS. It invalidates your medical exam. It invalidates your qualification. It invalidates your contract.

BEFORE MEPS, OR AFTER BASIC TRAINING. NOT IN-BETWEEN.
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Old 06-11-2017, 04:38 PM
 
7,749 posts, read 6,179,597 times
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OP, I'm trying to help you in a way you're probably not going to like. First off, boot camp exercise is absolutely NOTHING like high school gym class. I went to boot camp in Orlando and as part of a punishment for failing an inspection, they took a group of us into the break room (which we weren't allowed to use because we didn't earn it) and told us they were going to "make it rain". This meant they forced us to exercise constantly until the condensation from our sweat began dripping off the ceiling and this was in March. When spring approached, recruits were required to wear a canteen filled with water. I'm from south Louisiana and I saw plenty of recruits passing out from heat and dehydration in April.

Fast forward to my time on a Navy ship. Most of the ship has AC. The two places that never have AC were the engine/fire room and the flight deck. The engine room could exceed 115 degrees when at sea. If you happen to have a vent turned to where you stood watch then you might be around 80 to 90 degrees in the pasty of the air flow. Most times those vents were turned to help keep the machinery from overheating. Even when the boilers and engines aren't working it could get over 90 degrees and extremely high humidity from the water and steam drains.
The flight deck is flat steel painted black and is always in the sun. It gets so hot the treads on their boots melt away after a few weeks. To make matters worse, the flight deck crew wear long sleeve turtle neck shirts, pants tucked into their boots, googles, and helmet in all that heat working around hot jet engines. Literally both the engine room guys and the flight deck guys end up with all their clothes drenched in sweat. We watch each other carefully because if one stops sweating, they're in danger of dying. Nearly happened several times.

I'll leave it up to the Army and Marine guys to tell their examples of the dangers you could face with your condition if you join up. Seriously, like I said I'm from south Louisiana and I got pulled out the engine room for heat exhaustion because I hadn't been paying attention to my hydration and sweat and the engines and boilers weren't on at the time.
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Old 06-11-2017, 05:43 PM
 
7,749 posts, read 6,179,597 times
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Something else to consider is in most cases you don't get to pick your job nor duty station even if you get through boot camp. On a Navy ship EVERYONE must train in firefighting. So even if you get an easy air conditioned job assignment, regular fire drills would require you to get in the FFE or fire fighting ensemble which is a one piece jump suit of the same material civilian fire fighters wear. We sometimes had to wear it for at least an hour at a time while going up and down ladders (very steep stairs).

If you're serious about joining the military with your condition I would strongly suggest you go Air Force. Of all the branches of the military theirs is the overall easiest unless you become a pilot or special forces.
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Old 06-11-2017, 07:28 PM
 
9,035 posts, read 13,598,950 times
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Try an anti-per spirant, either roll on or spray, preferably unscented, to use on your hands and feet. Get a strong one Mitchum, also there's Secret Clinical Strength. That should get you past any physicals, interviews, etc. Once you're past basic training you shouldn't be in positions that require "excessive sweating". Good Luck!


I know what you mean about constantly carrying a handkerchief or tissues. Since I was in my teens, I've had constant post-nasal drip. I no sooner blow my nose than it drips again. I'm always carrying some sort of tissue. I have to check my pockets before laundry or I end up washing a tissue, then have to pick it out of my clothes, yuck!
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Old 06-11-2017, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
6,798 posts, read 5,342,495 times
Reputation: 8855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost and Confused View Post
You're absolutely right I managed without going to a doctor. I even participated in gym everyday, and it wasn't a big issue. Eventhough my palms sweat I make cards and love to draw. I even did my sisters, friends, and families hair, so I guess its not a big deal. After I complete the process I'm going to go to the doctor, and look into topical medication. Will I be able to take it to basic? Would getting a prescription for it help?
Stop with the being concerned about it. Forget medication. Just have a go at it and deal with it later if it arises.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:00 AM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
591 posts, read 303,950 times
Reputation: 1434
You need to remember OP that there are lots of things that will DQ up front, but are fine once you are in. We had a sailor in boot camp that got severe razor burn. The first couple of days, his face looked like a war zone. He got a medical "chit" that said that he wasn't required to shave until his face healed, that took 2 weeks. After that, he got another "chit" that said that he was required to use an electric razor, NO ONE is allowed to use that without a Doctors order. Well guess what, the electric razor caused bumps, so he was allowed to have a 5 o'clock shadow.


He would have been DQ if he had brought this up before he joined. The last I talked to him on facebook, he is getting ready to retire. There is a difference between something like this, which is just a nuisance, and something that can kill you, like asthma.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:21 AM
 
1,066 posts, read 2,075,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost and Confused View Post
This is a question I want to ask my recruiter, but I'm not even sure I should ask. My face, palms, and feet sweat excessively. It's been that way at the age of nine. I guess it never really bothered me until now. Whenever I go out there's always a rag in the palm of my hand. Sometimes its so hot at times my palms look like I went running or even went for a swim. Asking the people at MEPS is even out of the question. They're always finding ways to get someone disqualified. Other than that I'm healthy, so I can't complain.



Ok now hold on a sec- aren't you the same person that was questioning BC for cramps on another thread? you know it does seem to me that YOU are the one trying to get yourself disqualified. Maybe the military isn't the place for you- are you sure you're all in for this? just saying.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,322 posts, read 7,025,524 times
Reputation: 5635
OP, you really need to evaluate if the military is right for you. All these posts with all the trouble you're having with the enlistment process doesn't leave me to believe you're the military type. For the most part, in the military you're expected to be somewhat capable of taking care of yourself without excessive hand holding. If you can't make it through the enlistment process without all these issues you're going to have a hard time once you're in with hundreds and thousands of people and lost in the shuffle.
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