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Old 06-15-2017, 01:10 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
765 posts, read 480,459 times
Reputation: 2003

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LBTRS View Post
While I agree with your overall point, you start by saying the branch is more important and end by saying the job is more important.

My 26 years in the Navy showed me the branch is way more important than the job. I'm very glad I spent my 26 years in the Navy. I was able to switch jobs inside the Navy but was always glad I was a Sailor regardless of what job I was doing.

The branches I listed are due to the bases being around population centers, with the exception being the Air Force. I stand by what I said, I would choose the Navy, not because I served in the Navy, but because of base locations, and her husbands job. The Navy has this list of the largest duty stations.


*Naval Station Norfolk
*The Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam
*Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville
*Naval Base San Diego
*Naval Station Mayport
*Naval Base Kitsap
*Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi



All of these are in areas with large numbers of federal employees. Compare that to the Air Force, which has major installations in ND, MT, OK, SD, WY.


So based on her situation, the Navy would be the best bet. Unless the Navy only offered manual labor type jobs.
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Old 06-15-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,399,524 times
Reputation: 48621
Quote:
Originally Posted by MedvedActual View Post
Can't comment on service specific possibilities but as far as your husband's federal job goes, if you are active duty and get PCS orders to a different station, he can apply for Program S (part of the preferred personnel placement) which gives him priority in getting another federal position at the new location. Something I am currently going through with my wife who is active duty. Of course, it is rough to quit a good position but at times that may be for the best of both.
Yep. I have done so when pcsing with spouse as well.
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Old 06-18-2017, 07:36 AM
 
1,407 posts, read 2,152,493 times
Reputation: 1428
I'm a current Navy Reservist and personal friends with a reserve Officer recruiter.

To be blunt, you don't really have a shot at getting into the reserves as a direct commission Officer. The reserves wants DCO applicants with at least 5 years of experience in their fields. It's not meant for people straight out of college. In fact, the Navy reserves in general really favors former fleet people who transferred to the reserves. Most direct commissioned Officers who were never prior active duty hit a ceiling at O-5 and very rarely advance past it. DCO's also get treated much differently than the prior active duty counterparts.
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Old 06-18-2017, 07:42 AM
 
1,407 posts, read 2,152,493 times
Reputation: 1428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MedvedActual View Post
Can't comment on service specific possibilities but as far as your husband's federal job goes, if you are active duty and get PCS orders to a different station, he can apply for Program S (part of the preferred personnel placement) which gives him priority in getting another federal position at the new location. Something I am currently going through with my wife who is active duty. Of course, it is rough to quit a good position but at times that may be for the best of both.
The odds of the priority spouse program actually landing you something is extremely low in most high paying federal jobs. I deal with this system all the time. With the amount of different hiring programs like Vet preference, overseas priority, and career advancement for the permanent fed employees it severely limits the chance of spousal placement actually happening.

Also, hiring managers who control who gets hired do everything they can to avoid hiring a military spouse because they don't want to train them only to have them PCS again in a few years. Believe me when I say federal managers know how to skirt HR. Is it right? No. But it's reality and something I've witnessed multiple times.
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Old 06-18-2017, 09:46 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,145 posts, read 38,919,946 times
Reputation: 28124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramidsurf View Post
The odds of the priority spouse program actually landing you something is extremely low in most high paying federal jobs. I deal with this system all the time. With the amount of different hiring programs like Vet preference, overseas priority, and career advancement for the permanent fed employees it severely limits the chance of spousal placement actually happening.
That is misleading...

My wife was Federal Service for 29 years. She was relocated with each of my Permanent Change of Stations (I did have some short tours). Yes there was a reduction in rank, but not base pay (was moved to different areas with different cost of living pay). She retired under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), Worked in seven locations, (Europe, Maryland, New Mexico, Pennsylvania) four agencies. 95% of her college degree was paid for by DoE. She started as a GS-2 part-time employee (which changed very quickly in less than a year), and declined GS-13 promotion, after deciding to retire.

I was in the U.S. Army when she started Federal Service.

There are a lot of opportunities Federal Service, you do have to be awake and be willing to work, take opportunities, change career fields as needed and begin to learn the system. Yes, there are some hardships.
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Old 06-18-2017, 12:42 PM
 
1,407 posts, read 2,152,493 times
Reputation: 1428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
That is misleading...
Not trying to be misleading. I was speaking to higher grade employees. When she said her husband had an amazing federal job I assumed he was a gs13 or above.

My experience is a federal employee is going to face significant hurdles trying to utilize the placement program if they're in a high grade. I've known 3 different people who pcs'd from DC as 14s and couldn't get hired on as anything higher than 11 in San Diego which meant a significant pay cut and career stagnation.

The higher grade fed positions in fleet concentration areas are not going to spouses in my experience.
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Old 06-18-2017, 06:43 PM
 
691 posts, read 646,092 times
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1. Don't talk to a recruiter until you are well past the minimum standards, but it sounds like that won't take long.
2. Go enlisted in ANG or USAFR (whatever is closest to your home), once you get on board and prove yourself for a few years, you can start looking at commissioning. You will likely need a strong recommendation from your CC, so enlist, be **** hot, learn all expectations and blow them out of the water. PT is a big deal currently AF wide, so get in and stay in great shape.
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Old 06-19-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: The Commonwealth of Virginia
598 posts, read 312,579 times
Reputation: 871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramidsurf View Post
To be blunt, you don't really have a shot at getting into the reserves as a direct commission Officer. The reserves wants DCO applicants with at least 5 years of experience in their fields. It's not meant for people straight out of college.
Navy DCO programs are very competitive. But you should talk to the recruiter. He'll tell you what you're up against. Put in a package. If you aren't selected, put in another package. You can always enlist, and then submit a DCO package after you have a couple of years under your belt. I've seen that happen.


Quote:
In fact, the Navy reserves in general really favors former fleet people who transferred to the reserves. Most direct commissioned Officers who were never prior active duty hit a ceiling at O-5 and very rarely advance past it. DCO's also get treated much differently than the prior active duty counterparts.
That was not my experience, at all, in the Navy Reserve. I just retired as a Reserve Navy Supply Officer. I knew plenty of DCOs who were promoted to O-6 (and one or two even made flag!). And in my community, it simply was not the case that DCOs were treated differently. In 24 years in the Navy Reserve, often we didn't know who was a DCO and who was a NAVET. DCOs made significant contributions to the mission, and the Navy recognized that. (I was a NAVET, BTW.....four years of active duty prior to joining the Reserve.)

--

Last edited by Bill790; 06-19-2017 at 10:35 AM..
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Old 06-19-2017, 08:20 PM
 
1,407 posts, read 2,152,493 times
Reputation: 1428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill790 View Post
That was not my experience, at all, in the Navy Reserve. I just retired as a Reserve Navy Supply Officer. I knew plenty of DCOs who were promoted to O-6 (and one or two even made flag!). And in my community, it simply was not the case that DCOs were treated differently. In 24 years in the Navy Reserve, often we didn't know who was a DCO and who was a NAVET. DCOs made significant contributions to the mission, and the Navy recognized that. (I was a NAVET, BTW.....four years of active duty prior to joining the Reserve.)

--
My experience is the polar opposite of yours.

I guess it depends on the community.

Last edited by Pyramidsurf; 06-19-2017 at 08:58 PM..
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Old 06-20-2017, 05:04 AM
 
Location: The Commonwealth of Virginia
598 posts, read 312,579 times
Reputation: 871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyramidsurf View Post
I guess it depends on the community.
Maybe it does. But my last Reserve unit was in Norfolk, and the gaining command was a Joint, active duty command under TRANSCOM. It was a BIG unit, with many different designators. The CO was a SWO, the XO was Intel. We had SWOs, pilots, NFOs, a lot of intel guys (and gals), cyber guys, Supply Officers, PAOs, etc. There was ZERO difference between the NAVETs and the DCOs. ZERO. In ALL of those communities. And I know for a fact that the AD leadership at the gaining command made ZERO distinction between NAVETs and DCOs when requesting people to support exercises. Everybody contributed. We were ONE team.

What community are you in?

--
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