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Old 07-20-2017, 07:01 PM
 
4,720 posts, read 4,840,969 times
Reputation: 4853

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve40th View Post
Did you receive a Combat Action Ribbon? Thats what the Navy gives you , if you were in Combat. Surface or Ground.
On the flip side.

Worked with a nice Air Force veteran. He was stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam time.

He received all Vietnam medals including the Combat Action Ribbon.

He was a air reconnaissance photo developer or some such MOS. Stationed at base in Thailand on ground.

He lived off base in Thailand. Had a live in "housekeeper". Did his laundry, cooking, and "other".

He never put one foot on ground in Vietnam.

How did he get the Combat Action Ribbon living/stationed in Thailand on ground?

 
Old 07-20-2017, 07:14 PM
 
17,938 posts, read 9,863,505 times
Reputation: 17425
Quote:
Originally Posted by unit731 View Post
On the flip side.

Worked with a nice Air Force veteran. He was stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam time.

He received all Vietnam medals including the Combat Action Ribbon.

He was a air reconnaissance photo developer or some such MOS. Stationed at base in Thailand on ground.

He lived off base in Thailand. Had a live in "housekeeper". Did his laundry, cooking, and "other".

He never put one foot on ground in Vietnam.

How did he get the Combat Action Ribbon living/stationed in Thailand on ground?
I don't know, and I was there then. He was supporting either the U-2 or the SR-71 (depending on exactly the time and location). I was a reconnaissance photo interpreter.
 
Old 07-21-2017, 03:06 AM
 
3,933 posts, read 2,282,450 times
Reputation: 1781
Quote:
Originally Posted by unit731 View Post
On the flip side.

Worked with a nice Air Force veteran. He was stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam time.

He received all Vietnam medals including the Combat Action Ribbon.

He was a air reconnaissance photo developer or some such MOS. Stationed at base in Thailand on ground.

He lived off base in Thailand. Had a live in "housekeeper". Did his laundry, cooking, and "other".

He never put one foot on ground in Vietnam.

How did he get the Combat Action Ribbon living/stationed in Thailand on ground?
Thats the Army that approved his CAR. Only one US Ship received it during Vietnam..
It really doesnt matter. Seems most people just want to downplay someones perceived accomplishments.
Our society doesnt look up to anyone much anymore. We tend to put bad people on pedestals. Heroes, rich hard working people our frowned upon..
 
Old 07-21-2017, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
275 posts, read 225,181 times
Reputation: 500
I suspect the VA will not change it's ways.

As for combat vs. non-combat, how they are viewed depends on the person. As seen here, many consider them equal. I've seen it's different among vets however. I've heard vets at a local VFW speaking badly about other vets that weren't in combat. Sad to see but people are people.
 
Old 07-21-2017, 05:01 AM
 
3,933 posts, read 2,282,450 times
Reputation: 1781
Combat vs Non Combat is silly. Get over it peeps, thats what I would tell them
 
Old 07-26-2017, 03:35 PM
 
8,388 posts, read 7,382,268 times
Reputation: 18262
In 1952 I joined the Navy, to keep from being drafted by the Army, with my draft notice in the post office box. First year I spent in boot camp and then 2 different schools for a sea going rate. My rate and training was catapults to fire the planes from the carriers and to catch them with arresting gear. Instead I was sent to VR2, a navy air transport squadron where we sent passengers and cargo to other airports. There a few months, and then bureau of naval personnel sent orders for me to go to another air transport squadron in Hawaii. There was involved in both passengers and cargo. I was married and we had a small son, that had to be near the UC Hospital in San Francisco. We had to leave him with his grandmother so my wife could be with me. After 4 months I was again ordered by the bureau of naval personnel to go back to my original squadron as Air Terminal Chief over passengers, cargo, and flight attendants. I got to fly over to Hawaii overnight sleeping in a bunk, and then watching them serve the passengers their breakfast. Then flew back home that night, sleeping in a bunk all night to again watch them serve breakfast. I was an E-4 doing a E-7 job, and had replaced a Navy Chief (E-7) who retired. That is why I spent 2 nights and one day going to and from Hawaii for flight skins which means 1/2 base pay every month. Due to our son who was the first person to live from Spinal Meningitis, due to a shunt to drain the fluid. The hospital had been granted the money to 3 of these operations, and he was the first to live. I had put in for service near San Francisco for the hospital. The hospital demanded I be brought back. One of the 3 personal letters I had to submit, was from our family doctor in my small Northern California Town who had been my sons doctor that sent him to the UC hospital, and had cared for him since he was sent home after the operation. That is when I learned he was a Brigadier General, US Army Reserves. I had known him all my life, and he had gone to school 1-k with my mother.

The office manager that took my request had little belief I would be transferred back to California, until he saw the letter signed by the BG. Once he saw that, he told me we should start packing. I asked him if an army general would be an influence in the Navy. He told me that when a General speaks, every one listens. My orders were that I could not be sent to anyplace over 100 miles of San Francisco, for as long as my son was alive. He lived till 60 years old, and when in the hospital for something else got infected with the same disease he beat once, but this time it killed him. They had been looking all over for a replacement Air Terminal Chief at VR-1, and when my orders flashed in front of them, they chose my old squadron due to my job code number meeting the needs for the chief's job. My section leaders (one overseeing cargo, and one overseeing passengers, were E-5 and E-6. It was a touchy few days when I took over, but they finally realized that I was the boss, even though they both were above my pay grade.

When in the Hawaii assignment to VR-21, I was given the ribbon for being in foreign service, because my squadron went to Japan and Vietnam with cargo and passengers. It allowed me to join the VFW.

There were days I wished I had shipped over. I was offered a LT. JG commission if I shipped over, but turned it down. I am glad I did not ship over, as I could never have built the kind of life and income levels I reached in civilian life.
 
Old 07-29-2017, 09:45 PM
 
15,026 posts, read 8,568,934 times
Reputation: 25015
There will always be a sort of class divide, if you will, in the military especially in the Army and the Marines.

It is my opinion that many in combat arms in the Army and the Marines view themselves as above and separate from the combat support soldiers and units. And by combat arms, I mean infantry, infantry over all other MOS' and ratings. That those in infantry are 'real' soldiers and Marines and the support staff are not. I base this on personal experience and also from reading things online. The boot camp/basic training for infantry is physically and mentally harder than for other ratings/MOS as a reflection of the job itself.

To outsiders, this may seem unfair and bad, but it is what it is. There's always been derogatory names for the combat support, REMF (rear echelon mother f----), pogue, and a term invented during the Iraq occupation, fobbits. If you go to some of these well known military oriented Facebook pages, those in infantry tend to mock and insult the non infantry regularly.

Society itself always seems to put on a pedestal those in the military who perform the most heroic of deeds in battle, in this case the infantry. Same with the media. Every military character in the movie and TV are all Spec Ops super duper combat hardened war heroes. When's the last time you saw a brave and heroic lead character with a military past as a chef or a mechanic?
 
Old 07-30-2017, 03:25 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,677 posts, read 4,493,993 times
Reputation: 5944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
There will always be a sort of class divide, if you will, in the military especially in the Army and the Marines.

It is my opinion that many in combat arms in the Army and the Marines view themselves as above and separate from the combat support soldiers and units. And by combat arms, I mean infantry, infantry over all other MOS' and ratings. That those in infantry are 'real' soldiers and Marines and the support staff are not. I base this on personal experience and also from reading things online. The boot camp/basic training for infantry is physically and mentally harder than for other ratings/MOS as a reflection of the job itself.

To outsiders, this may seem unfair and bad, but it is what it is. There's always been derogatory names for the combat support, REMF (rear echelon mother f----), pogue, and a term invented during the Iraq occupation, fobbits. If you go to some of these well known military oriented Facebook pages, those in infantry tend to mock and insult the non infantry regularly.

Society itself always seems to put on a pedestal those in the military who perform the most heroic of deeds in battle, in this case the infantry. Same with the media. Every military character in the movie and TV are all Spec Ops super duper combat hardened war heroes. When's the last time you saw a brave and heroic lead character with a military past as a chef or a mechanic?
So true. As a REMF myself I have felt that but I will put this out so that people do not get a wrong view of a divided force. The banter is exactly as you describe but just as easy as it is that a mechanic and an infantry soldier would get into a fight in a bar. They would just as quickly take up fisticuffs against a civilian gang that picks on one or the other at the drop of the hat. This holds true with the esprit de corps between the services themselves (army, navy, air force, and marines). They might fight each other over who is the more important, or who has the most/less of this or that. But have an outsider (civilian) pick a fight with a service member in a bar where there is a service member of another branch or two and they will stand back to back under incredible odds in defense of each other.
 
Old 07-30-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
2,834 posts, read 4,027,605 times
Reputation: 3002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve40th View Post
Thats the Army that approved his CAR. Only one US Ship received it during Vietnam..
It really doesnt matter. Seems most people just want to downplay someones perceived accomplishments.
Our society doesnt look up to anyone much anymore. We tend to put bad people on pedestals. Heroes, rich hard working people our frowned upon..

Steve, unless I'm mistaken, the Army doesn't issue a CAR, only the Navy and Marines issue these ribbons. The Army (during Vietnam) issued CIB's for combat infantry MOS's, on rare occurrences a non infantry MOS could be issued a CIB.
 
Old 07-30-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
5,892 posts, read 3,164,394 times
Reputation: 11919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
There will always be a sort of class divide, if you will, in the military especially in the Army and the Marines.

It is my opinion that many in combat arms in the Army and the Marines view themselves as above and separate from the combat support soldiers and units. And by combat arms, I mean infantry, infantry over all other MOS' and ratings. That those in infantry are 'real' soldiers and Marines and the support staff are not. I base this on personal experience and also from reading things online. The boot camp/basic training for infantry is physically and mentally harder than for other ratings/MOS as a reflection of the job itself.

To outsiders, this may seem unfair and bad, but it is what it is. There's always been derogatory names for the combat support, REMF (rear echelon mother f----), pogue, and a term invented during the Iraq occupation, fobbits. If you go to some of these well known military oriented Facebook pages, those in infantry tend to mock and insult the non infantry regularly.

Society itself always seems to put on a pedestal those in the military who perform the most heroic of deeds in battle, in this case the infantry. Same with the media. Every military character in the movie and TV are all Spec Ops super duper combat hardened war heroes. When's the last time you saw a brave and heroic lead character with a military past as a chef or a mechanic?
It's the same in the Air Force, but the class divide is between flyers and everyone else. Whether officer or enlisted, wearing a flight suit and a set of wings sets you apart from everyone else.
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