U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-29-2017, 01:00 PM
 
7,685 posts, read 6,044,095 times
Reputation: 9992

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
There is a wide spectrum of PTSD and how people deal with it.

My parents were physically abusive and I had nightmares until I was in my 40s [long after I had retired from 20-years of Active Duty], it all depends on how your brain handles it.

I have been on subs during floodings, fires and one at-sea collision, none of which gave me nightmares. Though I served with men who said that the at-sea collision gave them nightmares.
I was in the bulge of a mine sweeper to remove a pump for repairs. At the time I was the smallest person in the shop and the only one who could get to the pump to turn wrenches. Space was so tight it took me more than ten minutes to get to the pump and in a position to sit up and turn wrenches. Safety rule was no one below the deck plates without a safety observer. Tags were checked and double checked before I turned wrenches. Followed the rule of loosening the bolts without removing. When the flange separated I had a solid spray of ice cold sea water hit my face and chest. Pressure was so great I couldn’t block the water with my hands. I couldn’t see nor breath. Only room to move my head an inch or two to the left or right. The guys watching me picked up the steel deck plate and dropped it between my face and the water. Once I was able to breath I could tighten the bolts and get out. Several days later a patch was put over the intake at the hull and I had to go back down again. More than a decade later I was still having occasional nightmares of drowning. Nightmares subsided until one day at work I got some chemicals in my eyes. Went to the ER and when the cold saline rinse hit my face I almost punched the nurse. My heart was racing. It was like I was drowning again even though I could breath.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-29-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,777 posts, read 43,636,318 times
Reputation: 14683
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
I was in the bulge of a mine sweeper to remove a pump for repairs. At the time I was the smallest person in the shop and the only one who could get to the pump to turn wrenches. Space was so tight it took me more than ten minutes to get to the pump and in a position to sit up and turn wrenches. Safety rule was no one below the deck plates without a safety observer. Tags were checked and double checked before I turned wrenches. Followed the rule of loosening the bolts without removing. When the flange separated I had a solid spray of ice cold sea water hit my face and chest. Pressure was so great I couldn’t block the water with my hands. I couldn’t see nor breath. Only room to move my head an inch or two to the left or right. The guys watching me picked up the steel deck plate and dropped it between my face and the water. Once I was able to breath I could tighten the bolts and get out. Several days later a patch was put over the intake at the hull and I had to go back down again. More than a decade later I was still having occasional nightmares of drowning. Nightmares subsided until one day at work I got some chemicals in my eyes. Went to the ER and when the cold saline rinse hit my face I almost punched the nurse. My heart was racing. It was like I was drowning again even though I could breath.
Stuff like that can stay with you a long time. Never known when it might came back.

I have gone through many Damage Control 'trainers', where they have a room made to look like a bilge full of piping and equipment. Every fitting is loose when they start each session water is spraying from every pipe as it slowly fills the compartment. We commonly finish having to dive down to tighten forgotten bolts.

The trainers are better than being at-sea though. When you are in a trainer, you know there are cameras watching you and if you have serious problems, any instructor can hit a switch and the water drains out fast, with corpsmen coming to get you.

When flooding happens underwater you do not have that same kind of safety feature. When a pipe blows apart at-sea it is far more stressful.

Through floodings, buddies getting electrocuted and fires, it has been the fires that stay in my mind the strongest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-29-2017, 04:59 PM
 
7,685 posts, read 6,044,095 times
Reputation: 9992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Stuff like that can stay with you a long time. Never known when it might came back.

I have gone through many Damage Control 'trainers', where they have a room made to look like a bilge full of piping and equipment. Every fitting is loose when they start each session water is spraying from every pipe as it slowly fills the compartment. We commonly finish having to dive down to tighten forgotten bolts.

The trainers are better than being at-sea though. When you are in a trainer, you know there are cameras watching you and if you have serious problems, any instructor can hit a switch and the water drains out fast, with corpsmen coming to get you.

When flooding happens underwater you do not have that same kind of safety feature. When a pipe blows apart at-sea it is far more stressful.

Through floodings, buddies getting electrocuted and fires, it has been the fires that stay in my mind the strongest.
I was electrocuted on the LaSalle. Was testing the battle lanterns over the SSTG (turbine generators). One was wired incorrectly by a ship yard worker. Got zapped hard. The slight shift was enough to break the circuit. That’s when I learned too much oxygen will get you high. Been in small fires that never had the chance to become big fires. I was M-dig DCPO. Have a letter of commendation for my fire fighting equipment passing multiple operations inspections. More important to me is the fact that every time my fire fighting equipment was needed it worked like it should. Was DCPO on the USS Iwo Jima LPH2. When I arrived on the LaSalle AGF3 it was in such horrible shape I demanded the DCPO job. What I found was shocking. Even the extinguishers on the boiler flats used for lighting fires in boilers would never have worked when needed. Found one that was rusted through. Found another PKP with the CO2 cartridge fully discharged and a new tamper seal. The powder in that one was rock hard solid. Found an empty CO2 extinguisher that one watch person had used to make his sodas ice cold. This was at the generator transfer panel. I found battle lantern 6 volt batteries so old they crumbled to a powder when they fell to the deck. I found hoses that leaked like a sieve when water was turned on. Found one hose station that a Marine had used to test how sharp was his knife. I was a lousy Machinist Mate but I was a damn good DCPO and no one died from my equipment failing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 01:37 PM
 
3,216 posts, read 893,534 times
Reputation: 4102
PTSD, IMHO, is on a curve like many such things. Back in the old days they called it "shell shock" and it was well known that some soldiers who had a certain experience on the battlefield were "used up" in that they because so attuned to the idea of never experiencing that shock again that they became ineffective grunts.

But today it is used to describe many other types of experiences than just war.
"PTSD is a disorder that develops in some people who have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event."

The key metric is whether one then feels that same stress over a period of years when there is nothing to be afraid of (or much less)....

I have a disabled family member who has been through 12 brain and spinal surgeries - a therapist recently told her that she has PTSD. I think they mean that she focuses on it constantly since she will need more and the memory of all those situations just can't be compartmentalized.

I was 1/2 joking with my wife and said it's the two of US that have PTSD.....since we are the ones that have had to deal with all the surgeries.

All that said - very few people get an easy or free ride through this life. Go out and talk to people are you will find that many of them have been through unbelievable stuff.

Note - I would worry about large amounts of weapons in the hands of folks with heavy-duty PTSD. My limited experience, tho, shows that they are often their own targets when push comes to shove....but if the case has gone from "limited PTSD which is improving" to "mental breakdown" levels, then I'd worry.

This guy prob has it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Hn9xAaKUbw
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top