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Old 10-08-2017, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,532 posts, read 4,232,435 times
Reputation: 4067

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I would just reveal it. Everyone's gone over the details, but the upshot is-being denied a clearance is because you are not trustworthy and/or are in a position to be blackmailed. There is a whole list of things that indicate you are not trustworthy, including what you did.

However, there is also a whole list of things that 'mitigate' what people did. In this context, you still did it-but have proven it was unique or unlikely to be repeated, and you were honest about the initial offense. The biggest mitigator of all, for anything that can be mitigated, is time. You have that. Tell the truth and you'll be fine.
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Old 10-08-2017, 03:57 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,117 times
Reputation: 20
Okay... I really appreciate everyone responding it does make me feel at ease. I will just let the recruiter know right away. I figured my dumb decision would have been the end of the line for me attempting to join the military. I’ll just go through the waiver process and make myself shine lol. This is something I really want to do especially before I get any older. Otherwise if I don’t I know I will regret it. Again... thanks everyone for replying.
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Old 10-08-2017, 04:37 PM
 
520 posts, read 409,831 times
Reputation: 839
Most jobs in the military require a security clearance. The military has gotten picky.Unemployment levels are still high no matter what the gov says. Many poor unemployed folks to chose from.
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Old 10-08-2017, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,532 posts, read 4,232,435 times
Reputation: 4067
Being honest is always the best policy, and what your brothers and sisters in arm deserve. Be forthright and upfront, admit it was a mistake, and be ready to explain what you've learned from the mistake.

When I was working recruiting officers, people who did that were the ones I fought for and would not give up on. It didn't always work, but nobody left those fights thinking we didn't exhaust every possible legal avenue.

Very few people are perfect, and many of us made dumb mistakes before entering, or sometimes even after entering, the military. Those who 'remembered' their mistakes after the contract was already processed (but had not yet finished the process) are the ones I did not fight for.
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Old 10-09-2017, 05:46 AM
 
9,156 posts, read 15,146,574 times
Reputation: 16577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starter88 View Post
So if I go to a local police barracks and get my fingerprints taken, placed on a card, and I mail it to Clarksburks WV to get a FBI background check and it comes back “ No Record Found “ ( which I have done multiple times for civil service jobs ) it means nothing and the DoD gets a different result?
The DoD, police agencies, prosecutors' offices and a few others have access to expunged records. So, yes. you can run your record and it will come back clean because you are not authorized access to expunged files. Others will run your file and the expunged arrest will be there.
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Old 10-10-2017, 11:07 AM
 
125 posts, read 221,567 times
Reputation: 61
Full disclosure is definitely recommended.


Just one scenario would be let's say you get in the military, then years later go to an assignment that requires TS/SCI clearance. TS/SCI clearance packages are about 90 page questionnaires that go into detail of everything in your background. This is just the questionnaire, and then there are the interviews. They will interview your family, your neighbors, your bosses, and yes probably the local PD. So yes, just be honest because you do not want to have 5-10 years invested in the military and then get separated because of something stupid like failure to disclose this.

Last edited by mjjudd; 10-10-2017 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 10-10-2017, 07:53 PM
 
16,766 posts, read 9,121,041 times
Reputation: 15978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkay66 View Post
Here's what you'll have to report on the SF 86 for a background check for a security clearance:



If you answer yes, you'll provide the details, including the outcome.

Here's a link, if you want to see the detail of what you'd have to answer for a security clearance.
https://www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/sf86-non508.pdf

Suggest you review it, then tell the recruiter the exact truth. By being totally up front, and by dint of you working for local police and fire, even though your arrest is within the seven year reporting timeframe, I do not see you having an issue.
Statistically these days, 40% of white males and 49% of black males will have been arrested by age 28.
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Old 10-15-2017, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
727 posts, read 317,916 times
Reputation: 1228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starter88 View Post
Here’s my case...

I am just looking to start the process to join the the military. I am 25 and currently work for the local police department in an admin role and I am an officer for my local fire department. In 2011 when I was 19 I was arrested for retail theft. A total of $575 which in military standards is grand larceny and is considered major misconduct which is not an easy waiver to get passed. I paid the business the money and paid the fines. The Charges were dismissed and the arrest was expunged. I have not been in trouble since. I have run my own background checks with the arresting department, my local department, the state police and FBI ( sent in fingerprint card ) and they all come back clean as a whistle.

Looking online not knowing this people they say the military will find it. Talking to guys that are/were in the service one of which is a recruiter saying the record won’t be found UNLESS you go a job that requires a secret clearance.

So what is it really!? Can I skate by with going for a job that doesn’t requires clearance!?
In all honesty, yours seems like a marginal case at worse without any major "red flags". I did research on the Vietnam War intensely for many years to study Agent Orange. There were many draftees who were literally given the choice of jail or combat. Case-in-point - John Steer, a survivor and amputee from the 173rd Airborne at Dak To. He had a really bad juvenile record and went to Vietnam as a teen. He lost his arm. There were many "grunts" like that . In your case, you seem really low key compared to historical cases of the 1960s and Vietnam War.

John L. Steer's Story

With the look in his eye, he had transitioned from a juvenile delinquent to battle-hardened soldier from the 173rd Airborne at only 19. Then he lost his arm.

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Old 10-15-2017, 08:49 PM
 
16,766 posts, read 9,121,041 times
Reputation: 15978
Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
In all honesty, yours seems like a marginal case at worse without any major "red flags". I did research on the Vietnam War intensely for many years to study Agent Orange. There were many draftees who were literally given the choice of jail or combat. Case-in-point - John Steer, a survivor and amputee from the 173rd Airborne at Dak To. He had a really bad juvenile record and went to Vietnam as a teen. He lost his arm. There were many "grunts" like that . In your case, you seem really low key compared to historical cases of the 1960s and Vietnam War.

John L. Steer's Story

With the look in his eye, he had transitioned from a juvenile delinquent to battle-hardened soldier from the 173rd Airborne at only 19. Then he lost his arm.
You may be right, but I'd point out that the old "jail or enlist" option has been long extinguished, and right now waivers can be tough to get.
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Old 10-16-2017, 08:23 AM
 
7,719 posts, read 10,849,157 times
Reputation: 9898
Just tell your recruiter and let him/her work the issue if it becomes one.
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