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Old 10-23-2017, 12:17 AM
 
384 posts, read 215,371 times
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I wonder why, is no one signing up to be in the Air Force anymore or are kids not able to pass their ASVAB test with a high enough score? Are kids distracted nowadays and morale is low? I read the news that Trump is trying to get retired Air Force pilots back to serve again. I noticed lots of kids in their 20's are distracted so I wonder if the ones in their 30's are probably too late to join? I know someone who is about in his early/mid 30's who's contemplating of joining the Air Force but may be too old for it, yet they want to bring back retired Air Force pilots? Shouldn't they focus on getting the newbies in? One person I spoke with said if one is over 35 they won't take you in, is this for real? I would assume at that age people have matured already instead of the straight out of high school kids that end up slacking in their 20's.
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Old 10-23-2017, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,633 posts, read 4,394,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethnicappalachian View Post
I wonder why, is no one signing up to be in the Air Force anymore or are kids not able to pass their ASVAB test with a high enough score? Are kids distracted nowadays and morale is low? I read the news that Trump is trying to get retired Air Force pilots back to serve again. I noticed lots of kids in their 20's are distracted so I wonder if the ones in their 30's are probably too late to join? I know someone who is about in his early/mid 30's who's contemplating of joining the Air Force but may be too old for it, yet they want to bring back retired Air Force pilots? Shouldn't they focus on getting the newbies in? One person I spoke with said if one is over 35 they won't take you in, is this for real? I would assume at that age people have matured already instead of the straight out of high school kids that end up slacking in their 20's.
I believe it's a 10 year active duty service commitment to become a pilot. I would guess that has a bit to do with it, that seems like an enormous amount of time when you are young and may have other opportunities. The kind of people the services, and particularly the Air Force, want probably do have those other opportunities.

As for the age, there is a distinct difference between trying to keep up with physical requirements of any branch in your 20s as opposed to 30s.
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Old 10-23-2017, 05:38 AM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
14,565 posts, read 6,702,194 times
Reputation: 6516
Part of the problem is the airlines. They are hiring and the Air Force has a ready pool of well-trained, qualified and experienced pilots. Why spend 20 years with deployments, uncertainty of assignments, and the possibility of being tossed out due to manning levels (happened 1993-1996) when the airlines offer a more stable home life, a relatively constant schedule, and after a few years significantly better pay and retirement? Of my pilot training class graduates, only ~10% stayed to 20+ (that I know of). Flip side: those who separated at the first opportunity and went to the airlines have been through at least two furlough cycles, and I personally know three who were either out of a job for 2+ years or went to the regionals flying a Jetstream.

It's getting harder to attract young people to get in as pilots; I don't really understand the core of that, I wanted to be a pilot since I was a very young child. However, the current active duty service commitment is ten years after graduation from SUPT, so any person looking to be an Air Force pilot is facing at least 11 years after commissioning. Many young people cannot comprehend that length of commitment, it's 50% of their existence at the time if they enter pilot training at 22, as I did.

As for starting with older aviators, realize that any pilot candidate represents a significant taxpayer investment. Several million dollars is spent to train a kid to become an F-16 or F-15E or B-1 pilot. Taking an older person might mean more "maturity" but also means more "set in your ways" personnel, and the possibility of health issues catching up with them.
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Old 10-23-2017, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Herndon, VA
1,913 posts, read 1,810,398 times
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It's clear to me that the OP doesn't know what it takes to become an Air Force pilot, because a pilot candidate doesn't take the ASVAB as that's a test for potential enlisted personnel. Pilots candidates are generally selected from the Air Force Academy.

https://fightersweep.com/455/road-wi...-pilot-part-2/

Quote:
If you’re in High School and have dreams of becoming a U.S. Air Force pilot, here’s my advice: the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA) is where you should go to school.
Here's what it takes to get into the Academy:

Quote:
What is required to be a competitive candidate for USAFA? Let’s look at the high school resumé of the average Air Force cadet:

3.82 GPA
Top 10% of graduating class
Varsity Letter Winner
National Honor Society member
SAT Verbal 642, Math 669
ACT Math 30, English, 30, Reading 30, S&R, 30, Writing 30
They don't take people off the streets and throw them into multi-million dollar aircraft. To get into the Academy, you can't be older than 23, and have to have a congressman or senator write you a letter of recommendation. In other words, you have to be a serious and dedicated individual. Not some 30-something that decides on a whim you'd like to fly aircraft for the Air Force.

With that said, becoming an Air Force pilot is a tedious and long term affair. You have be on your A game from your Freshman year at the Academy throughout flight school and later flight training. People wash out of the various flight programs by the bucket load, because they are so intense. The shortage is not because they don't have enough people that want to become pilots, because there are scores of them. The problem is finding people that are qualified and dedicated enough to make it through the rigorous program to the end.
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Old 10-23-2017, 10:13 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,133 posts, read 38,883,622 times
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Air Force authorized to recall up to 1,000 retired military pilots
By Morgan Winsor
Oct 21, 2017, 1:09 PM ET


Quote:
The United States Air Force has been authorized to recall as many as 1,000 retired military pilots to active-duty service to address an acute shortage in its ranks. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Friday allowing the Air Force to call back to service up to 1,000 retired aviation officers who wish to return, the White House and the Pentagon announced.
An Air Force spokeswoman said, however, that there are currently no plans to recall any retired pilots.

“The Air Force does not currently intend to recall retired pilots to address the pilot shortage," Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said. "We appreciate the authorities and flexibility delegated to us.”

By law, only 25 retired pilots can be recalled through voluntary programs to serve in any one military branch. Trump's executive order temporarily removes this limit by expanding a state of national emergency declared by President George W. Bush after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 as part of efforts "to mitigate the Air Force's acute shortage of pilots," according to Pentagon spokesman Navy Commander Gary Ross.

Secretary of Air Force Heather Wilson has said the service was short 1,555 pilots at the end of the 2016 fiscal year, including 1,211 fighter pilots.

To help make the pilot job more attractive, the Air Force expanded its aviation bonus program in August and increased incentive pay earlier this month for officers and enlisted crew members for the first time since 1999, according to Wilson.


Entire Article At: Air Force authorized to recall up to 1,000 retired military pilots - ABC News
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Old 10-23-2017, 10:48 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,133 posts, read 38,883,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethnicappalachian View Post
I wonder why, is no one signing up to be in the Air Force anymore or are kids not able to pass their ASVAB test with a high enough score?
Air Force hits recruiting goals with 33,000 new airmen
By: Stephen Losey   October 15, 2017


Quote:
The Air Force recruited 33,071 new airmen in fiscal 2017 — a slight drop from the previous year’s recruiting bonanza, but still far above other recent years.

The Air Force Recruiting Service on Oct. 6 announced that the service had met its recruitment goals and helped grow the service’s end strength to 322,500.

On Friday, AFRS said that the 2017 recruiting drive brought in 31,001 newly enlisted airmen, 295 who were previously enlisted, 1,201 new Line of the Air Force officers, 529 health professionals, and 45 chaplains.

The Air Force brought in 33,645 new recruits in fiscal 2016, which was the highest recruitment since the Vietnam era, and smashed through that year’s original goal of 28,000.
Entire Article: https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/y...00-new-airmen/
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Old 10-26-2017, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale
904 posts, read 406,869 times
Reputation: 1619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert20170 View Post
It's clear to me that the OP doesn't know what it takes to become an Air Force pilot, because a pilot candidate doesn't take the ASVAB as that's a test for potential enlisted personnel. Pilots candidates are generally selected from the Air Force Academy.

https://fightersweep.com/455/road-wi...-pilot-part-2/



Here's what it takes to get into the Academy:



They don't take people off the streets and throw them into multi-million dollar aircraft. To get into the Academy, you can't be older than 23, and have to have a congressman or senator write you a letter of recommendation. In other words, you have to be a serious and dedicated individual. Not some 30-something that decides on a whim you'd like to fly aircraft for the Air Force.

With that said, becoming an Air Force pilot is a tedious and long term affair. You have be on your A game from your Freshman year at the Academy throughout flight school and later flight training. People wash out of the various flight programs by the bucket load, because they are so intense. The shortage is not because they don't have enough people that want to become pilots, because there are scores of them. The problem is finding people that are qualified and dedicated enough to make it through the rigorous program to the end.
I agree that the AFA is a primary pool of future pilots. I lived in Colorado for 4 years and visited Colorado Springs many times.
But ROTC was also very strong at an undergraduate college I attended in the midwest. There were many ROTC guys in my
dorm from the different branches. A lot of them became pilots. Many did retire though in their 40s and went into the private sector.

In regards to the recruiting shortage, I studied public health. One main problem at the recruiting level is the excess of
obesity in the young population. It often disqualifies the modern young adults. The video games, smartphones, computers,
etc. lead to a sedentary lifestyle. The teens of the 60s, 70s, and 80s were relatively more active. A lot of them just can't make
the weight.
Too Fat to Fight: Military Threatened by Childhood Obesity | Military.com

Moreover, I think the airlines are too much in vogue with opportunities. A "hidden" variable not mentioned is the womanizing by pilots -
the "mile high" club (LOL). A young officer who is unmarried (or unhappily married) probably would find those civilian social
opportunities hard to resist. It's definitely immoral and professionally unethical, but this is noted under the context of realism.
Shocking Flight Attendant Stories - Mile High Club

But on a serious note, the heightened tensions in the Korean Peninsula and existing tensions in Afghanistan and Syria make it important to have pilots prepared. The shortage would be detrimental if a new war were to break out. Even in the "brief" Serbian Conflict of 1999 a Stealth bomber was
shot down. Well-trained pilots, engineers, and technicians are a must.
https://www.defenceaviation.com/2007...wn-part-1.html
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Old 10-26-2017, 09:10 AM
 
17,907 posts, read 9,843,391 times
Reputation: 17386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SluggoF16 View Post

As for starting with older aviators, realize that any pilot candidate represents a significant taxpayer investment. Several million dollars is spent to train a kid to become an F-16 or F-15E or B-1 pilot. Taking an older person might mean more "maturity" but also means more "set in your ways" personnel, and the possibility of health issues catching up with them.
Which brings us to:


Quote:
“The Air Force does not currently intend to recall retired pilots to address the pilot shortage," Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said. "We appreciate the authorities and flexibility delegated to us.”

Did anyone ask the Air Force if that executive order was necessary? Or was that just a political stunt?
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Old 10-26-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,007 posts, read 5,293,755 times
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I'll tell you why there is a shortage of pilots:
$200/hour to rent a plane with instructor to learn to fly.
40 hours plus ground school to get the ticket.
USAFA only has so many slots and they are not all pilots. Current class is 1200 cadets and about 1000 make it through.
About 1000 AFROTC graduates per year, not all pilots.
Expect a lot more RPA drones in the future Air Force.
Airlines pay better, but not always a top job opportunity.
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Old 10-26-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: USA
13,346 posts, read 7,301,172 times
Reputation: 9681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
I'll tell you why there is a shortage of pilots:
$200/hour to rent a plane with instructor to learn to fly.
40 hours plus ground school to get the ticket.
USAFA only has so many slots and they are not all pilots. Current class is 1200 cadets and about 1000 make it through.
About 1000 AFROTC graduates per year, not all pilots.
Expect a lot more RPA drones in the future Air Force.
Airlines pay better, but not always a top job opportunity.

I think this is part of it. It cost me $3500 all in to get my Private cert in 1994. That was in a Cessna 152 at $37/hour wet. The GA fleet is aging rapidly, and the newer Cirrus, Cessnas, etc are EXPENSIVE. I didn't go the Air Force, or Navy route as I didn't want the long term commitment, and if I washed out due to vision, or other reasons didn't want to get stuck in a job I hated. Looking back, I now think that was a bit selfish of me, but I had a opportunity to go to a good grad school so did that instead.
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