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Old 11-01-2017, 05:02 PM
 
24 posts, read 3,166 times
Reputation: 23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
Most of the training is honestly like TORTURE. It takes hours, and you do it alone, and have to watch torturous videos and take quizzes. you are allowed to do it during work time, but you don't have extra hours, so it often results in staying late. We all dread it!

There may be things that other people consider "BS" but these are the ones I most often hear complaints about. And more. For example, they make single Airmen (females) get a chlamydia test every year to prvent spread of disease amoung the troops, but not men. It's because women are forced to get PAPs for cancer screening, so it doesn't require an extra appointment. Everyone must get a teeth cleaning every year and the Air Force keeps track and then forces you to go. Everyone must get an HIV test every year and people think it's a hassle. They get upset when they're REALLY busy and the Air Force is like 'Go get a PAP Smear... go to the dentist... go get a flu shot... go get an HIV test... go take a fitness test... go do XXX training...also go volunteer... did you take college classes..." all while being busy with your job. Most people are irritated by anything that they have to do that isn't their "job."

Crosstraining is only guaranteed once, but lots of people do it more than once. Recruiting was my FOURTH job. I've done 3 other jobs completely unrelated to each other. If I went an got a nursing degree, I could switch again into nursing if I wanted for job #5 (just an example).
Wow, training does sound like a pain. I guess the health check ups are important and forcing people to do it is probably the only way to eliminate problems. In other words, in all honesty, I don't think I'd go to the dentist religiously but if I'm forced to it ensures I'll be in good health and catch anything early on. Does suck how it makes busy people busier.

Thanks for clarifying cross training! I was worried I'd be the guy to cross train, screw up and be stuck. But, its not guaranteed, right? You said it is once, but assuming your job is undermanned and you'd like to cross train to a job that isn't, I'd suspect they won't let you go?
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Old 11-01-2017, 05:10 PM
 
24 posts, read 3,166 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
Nope. You mistake asking questions with questioning authority. Two different things entirely. If you think your orders go against better judgement then questioning them is good. If you are questioning why you need to paint that rock in the middle of the parade field then have fun paint all the rocks around.

The military wants people that can think. Especially the enlisted corps and NCO's in particular. Officers don't need to think that is why they have sergeants. Oh and don't got ROTC. Earn your bar by experience first. Learn what it is like to be a soldier, sailor, or airman first. Then go learn how to lead them.

The best officers I know were enlisted for a time. Some even made sergeant. But because they lived life as a peon they learned that leadership has a price. Oh and do not underestimate the life of an NCO. The officers have lofty plans but it is the NCO's that really make it happen.
Ah, yes, I didn't think of that. That makes sense. Now I know if I have a good idea I won't be in issues.

If I do end up deciding to join I do think I'd definitely enlist. Getting real bored and tired of New York..
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Old 11-01-2017, 07:18 PM
 
7,749 posts, read 6,179,597 times
Reputation: 10182
I served 8 years in the Navy. On a ship everyone must learn basic and advance fire fighting. Navy ships have a wide variety of jobs. One job field includes being the barber, ship’s laundry, running the ship’s store, and maintaining vending machines. That’s just an example. More technical fields include nuclear engineering, electronics, electricians, engine room (titles depend on type of engines), and various aircraft maintenance (mechanical, electrical, & electronics). A Navy hospital corpsman serves on a shore hospital, a ship, or serves alongside the Marines in the field of combat. I suggest you talk to recruiters of different branches. The ASVAB test is merely a guide to help you select a field but you should look at all the jobs available and select those you feel best suits your personality, interest, and talents. If you have degrees then point this out to recruiters as this may qualify you for an officer program.
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Old 11-01-2017, 07:26 PM
 
7,749 posts, read 6,179,597 times
Reputation: 10182
Quote:
Originally Posted by TW195026 View Post
Thought the military doesn't like questioning
That's true but I meant as in having the opportunity to have the part time job as well
We asked questions all the time. Stupid questions will get stupid answers. On a carrier the two departments that have the highest fire fighting training are engineering and aviation. One day we were to be cross trained. Us engineers were sent to the flight deck for flight deck fire fighting training. One idiot had to ask the question, “they have their own fire fighting team so why do we have to learn this?” We all knew the answer but didn’t really want to think about it. This guy needed the answer to hit him in the head. The answer was, “if the explosives and fires kill them then you’re next to take their place!” He turned pale as a ghost. After our training, the aviation guys came down to the engine rooms to learn how to fight fires where we worked.
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Old 11-01-2017, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
11,379 posts, read 7,235,487 times
Reputation: 27520
I was in the Marines, but I feel the Air Force is a notch above all the other services in terms of opportunities and the way their people are treated.

Some years ago, my then GF had a son who was not doing much with his life. He had some college, and worked menial jobs here and there. He was going nowhere. Then he joined the AF. His first post was in Montana, where he joined their military police, guarding the missile installation out there. He was there a few years and then took a transfer to Atlanta, where he became a recruiter. Last I knew , he was still in the AF, and making a career of it.

It turned his life around. He and his wife have two homes now, nice cars, and a good living. His wife joined the AF after him, and went into IT work. Now, it is just like a 9-5 job, and they have security and a very good life.

So, based on that experience, I would say the AF would be a good choice for any young person who is not sure what they want to do in life.
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Old 11-01-2017, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
3,849 posts, read 1,842,039 times
Reputation: 6922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
You are getting good responses to your query. I went an alternative plan, serving as a USAFReserve Loadmaster while in college. Basic training then one weekend a month with two weeks in the summer. It is probably not a deal you could get anymore, this was 1966.
The discipline from the USAF training was essential in completing my engineering degree and for the rest of my life. Go for it!
I was a C-130 loadmaster for the last 17 years of my military career. Absolute best career field on the enlisted side.
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Old 11-02-2017, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
25,622 posts, read 21,510,681 times
Reputation: 11889
Joined the Army as after two years of college because I felt I had no direction, didn't like my major. Felt I was wasting tuition money. I was 20 yrs old. Sure could have used a lot of guidance on careers back then. Didn't have exposure to what was out there.....

Went to visit the Army recruiter. Picked a medical MOS (job). Saw that I enjoyed it and found it challenging. Saved money during this brief stint in the Army and returned to college after a 3 yr enlistment, got a worthwhile degree and returned to the Army as an officer (university ROTC program).

19 yrs later, retired with a 55% pension (19 yrs officer + 3 yrs enlisted time) and full healthcare. You don't see pensions like this around much anymore. Also earned a Masters Degree in the process (sent by US Army to be full time student while earning full Field Grade Officer Pay!)....I did travel, move around a lot - spent a lot of time in Germany (loved that), and some time in Bosnia, Central America, Afghanistan....but I played the game, experienced a lot.

Not all who enter the Army have a great outcome - you never know when, where the U.S.A. will get involved in wars. You pick the wrong job, you could be miserable. But if you get through a career, it's well worth it.

When I'm out and about and see 20-yrs olds doing some menial jobs, I just shake my heads. I feel like they're wasting their lives. I almost think a 2-yr mandatory enlistment should be required in this country. Just to give these directionless "kids" a start. I've seen so many young Americans make something out of their lives though the military.

Last edited by BucFan; 11-02-2017 at 03:55 AM..
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Old 11-02-2017, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,100 posts, read 3,690,994 times
Reputation: 4828
BucFan I agree that there should be some sort of service for young people. Most other countries have that. My family is from Korea (wife's family) and all young men have a 2 year commitment.

Thank you for your service BucFan. With out people like you people like me wouldn't get the quality care we needed.
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:07 AM
 
4,292 posts, read 5,818,158 times
Reputation: 3248
I would just be careful of running to the AF as if it will be the solution to your problems and then not liking it either - just like one of your switching majors decisions - because the AF decision is one that you get locked into for awhile. It could be just the thing for you or it might not. Have you asked yourself why you think a military option will be better for you? Or is it just a way to get an answer when you can't make up your mind? Would it really solve your motivation issues? Have you considered some more hands-on careers besides military such as a trade? Have you ever taken an aptitude or career-interest test?

Secondly, I would give you the advice to understand that the way today's world works you are not really deciding the rest of your life at 22. If you are willing, you can re-invent yourself as many times as you like and have multiple careers. And that sometimes there are moves from one career to another that don't seem obvious from your current viewpoint but when the time comes in your life for it to happen you may feel things coming together for it to make sense. The only caveat I'd offer to that is that a lack of stability in career direction can impact your ability to save for your retirement, so try to start saving for that now and do it consistently every month and continue to avoid debt as you have. I wish someone had given me that advice when I was your age.
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:41 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,869 posts, read 8,287,687 times
Reputation: 3917
Quote:
Originally Posted by TW195026 View Post
Wow, training does sound like a pain. I guess the health check ups are important and forcing people to do it is probably the only way to eliminate problems. In other words, in all honesty, I don't think I'd go to the dentist religiously but if I'm forced to it ensures I'll be in good health and catch anything early on. Does suck how it makes busy people busier.

Thanks for clarifying cross training! I was worried I'd be the guy to cross train, screw up and be stuck. But, its not guaranteed, right? You said it is once, but assuming your job is undermanned and you'd like to cross train to a job that isn't, I'd suspect they won't let you go?
It's not guaranteed. But, I've never really seen it denied, in my experience. The Air Force knows happy people are productive and committed. They might not get everything right, but this is one thing we do a really good job on because we want people to stay for "life."

There are also 90+ "Special Duties" you can apply for (recruiter, Thunderbirds/AirShows) that aren't regular jobs and aren't part of crosstraining. It's just an extra way to you get a new job. Here's detailed information on that. http://www.afpc.af.mil/Portals/70/do...-28-142615-090
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