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Old 11-04-2017, 12:25 AM
 
1,321 posts, read 424,777 times
Reputation: 2217

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TW195026 View Post
Yeah I'm aware about the different environment and I'm hoping I score well enough on the ASVAB and am able to get good choices, within all the branches in general.

Did not know the Air Force has its own college! That really sounds like a nice perk, do many take advantage of it?



Possible, yes. But I'd be looking at another few years as I'm not many credits in on my current major. What is the benefit of having an associate's? I've only read about 1) credits regarding what rank you enter in as and 2) bachelor's for officer. So I assumed it wouldn't mean much when enlisting

And I am aiming for Air Force but it will depend on how things fall through
Yes it is a great perk. More and more (enlisted) are taking advantage of it, especially once you get up to the point where you are testing for a SNCO slot, you must AT LEAST have a CCAF degree to make yourself competitive against others in your career field. I'm more partial to the entire CCAF thing because of my education counselor background, so it truly upset me when I would see young Airmen "get out" or SNCOs retiring without at least having their CCAF degree. Some don't view education as important as I do, but to each his own.

And yes, you may enter as an E-2 or E-3 depending on how many college credits you have already. Those ranks will take affect after you complete basic military training.

But remember, only "General Education" credits received before you enlist may be acceptable towards your CCAF degree. And look at it this way, what looks better on a job resume to job recruiters once you complete your service, a military background WITHOUT a degree, or a military background WITH a degree.

Be a good Soldier, Seaman or Airman, but USE the military to get what you want or where you need to be in life!! The benefits sometimes outweigh the actual quality of life, deployments, being away from family, job satisfaction, etc.
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Old 11-04-2017, 08:44 AM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
It might be easier than you think. I remember a time when the Air Force was forcing personnel in overage fields to cross train into fields that were undermanned. Loadmaster was one of those undermanned fields. dmarie123 would know more about the current C-130 Loadmaster manning level.
Good to know. I've watxhed a few videos on loadmaster and it sounds like a promising career choice as does aircrew in general
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Old 11-04-2017, 08:52 AM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington Steel View Post
Yes it is a great perk. More and more (enlisted) are taking advantage of it, especially once you get up to the point where you are testing for a SNCO slot, you must AT LEAST have a CCAF degree to make yourself competitive against others in your career field. I'm more partial to the entire CCAF thing because of my education counselor background, so it truly upset me when I would see young Airmen "get out" or SNCOs retiring without at least having their CCAF degree. Some don't view education as important as I do, but to each his own.

And yes, you may enter as an E-2 or E-3 depending on how many college credits you have already. Those ranks will take affect after you complete basic military training.

But remember, only "General Education" credits received before you enlist may be acceptable towards your CCAF degree. And look at it this way, what looks better on a job resume to job recruiters once you complete your service, a military background WITHOUT a degree, or a military background WITH a degree.

Be a good Soldier, Seaman or Airman, but USE the military to get what you want or where you need to be in life!! The benefits sometimes outweigh the actual quality of life, deployments, being away from family, job satisfaction, etc.
Ah forgot about only gen ed credits transferring. Not too worried though, as I wouldn't be surprised if I change majors again whike serving lol. But yeah, coming out with a degree definitely is more appealing.

The benefits overall really seem to outweigh the cons. If only this information was pushed to people in high school the same way college is
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Old 11-04-2017, 09:12 AM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
Another thing..I wanted to point out some quick health questions I had before work today.

I'm planning on seeing a doctor for small episodes of vertigo that I've had in the past. My family seems to have a history of dizziness and things in that nature. So I want to be evaluated to make sure I'm okay and don't have potential of being disqualified.

However, another of my worries is that I'm also nearsighted on my left eye. My right eye is good and I've never used correction lenses. I know it's not a huge issue, but would it be a good idea to also be seen before MEPS? I've read of people having to go to MEPS multiple times for waivers and disqualifications.

I've also had two surgeries on my left hand but neither were serious or have limited me. One on my middle finger for a nerve implant and one on my pinky finger for a football injury where I couldn't bend it to make a fist. It has been repaired but the first knuckle from the hand has not repaired and it doesn't straighten out all the way. Here's a similar picture of a right hand: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MpYM08K9lX...ptodactyly.jpg
As far as my understanding goes, the requirements are that the fingers should be functional in conjunction with the thumb?
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Old 11-04-2017, 06:19 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,898 posts, read 8,379,179 times
Reputation: 3934
Quote:
Originally Posted by TW195026 View Post
Another thing..I wanted to point out some quick health questions I had before work today.

I'm planning on seeing a doctor for small episodes of vertigo that I've had in the past. My family seems to have a history of dizziness and things in that nature. So I want to be evaluated to make sure I'm okay and don't have potential of being disqualified.

However, another of my worries is that I'm also nearsighted on my left eye. My right eye is good and I've never used correction lenses. I know it's not a huge issue, but would it be a good idea to also be seen before MEPS? I've read of people having to go to MEPS multiple times for waivers and disqualifications.

I've also had two surgeries on my left hand but neither were serious or have limited me. One on my middle finger for a nerve implant and one on my pinky finger for a football injury where I couldn't bend it to make a fist. It has been repaired but the first knuckle from the hand has not repaired and it doesn't straighten out all the way. Here's a similar picture of a right hand: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MpYM08K9lX...ptodactyly.jpg
As far as my understanding goes, the requirements are that the fingers should be functional in conjunction with the thumb?
Be careful going to the doctor for the vertigo. If they say it "MIGHT BE XYZ" you're going to have to get properly evaluated by specialists on everything it might possibly be. Your primary care doctor is NOT going to be able to diagnose a past episode of vertigo. It could be an inner ear issue, so now you have to go to an ENT. It could be blood sugar, so now you need to be evaluated for diabetes. It could be a tumor, so go see a neurologist. I could go on and on and on. If it wasn't bad enough to go to the ER or reoccurring, let it go.

Corrective lenses are fine as long as your RX isn't more than +/- 8.

For your hand, you would be disqualified if you have any of these conditions:
(5) Fingers and Thumb (726.4). Inability to clench fist, pick up a pin, grasp an object, or
touch tips of at least three fingers with thumb
c. Residual Weakness and Pain. Current disease, injury, or congenital condition with
residual weakness or symptoms that prevents satisfactory performance of duty, including but not
limited to chronic joint pain associated with the shoulder (719.41), the upper arm (719.42), the
forearm (719.43), and the hand (719.44); or chronic joint pain as a late effect of fracture of the
upper extremities (905.2), as a late effect of sprains without mention of injury (905.7), and as late
effects of tendon injury (905.8).
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Old 11-04-2017, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
4,083 posts, read 1,972,106 times
Reputation: 7490
Quote:
Originally Posted by TW195026 View Post
Another thing..I wanted to point out some quick health questions I had before work today.

I'm planning on seeing a doctor for small episodes of vertigo that I've had in the past. My family seems to have a history of dizziness and things in that nature. So I want to be evaluated to make sure I'm okay and don't have potential of being disqualified.

However, another of my worries is that I'm also nearsighted on my left eye. My right eye is good and I've never used correction lenses. I know it's not a huge issue, but would it be a good idea to also be seen before MEPS? I've read of people having to go to MEPS multiple times for waivers and disqualifications.

I've also had two surgeries on my left hand but neither were serious or have limited me. One on my middle finger for a nerve implant and one on my pinky finger for a football injury where I couldn't bend it to make a fist. It has been repaired but the first knuckle from the hand has not repaired and it doesn't straighten out all the way. Here's a similar picture of a right hand: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MpYM08K9lX...ptodactyly.jpg
As far as my understanding goes, the requirements are that the fingers should be functional in conjunction with the thumb?
You might want to skip that loadmaster thing. Stepping out onto the jump platform preparatory to turning the paratroop door over to the jumpmaster is no time to be dealing with vertigo.

Although, dmarie123, I am curious as to the need for C-130 loadmasters and loadmasters in general today. I do remember when AF personnel from overmanned fields were forced into undermanned fields, including loadmaster.
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Old 11-05-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
2,898 posts, read 8,379,179 times
Reputation: 3934
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
You might want to skip that loadmaster thing. Stepping out onto the jump platform preparatory to turning the paratroop door over to the jumpmaster is no time to be dealing with vertigo.

Although, dmarie123, I am curious as to the need for C-130 loadmasters and loadmasters in general today. I do remember when AF personnel from overmanned fields were forced into undermanned fields, including loadmaster.
We might need loadmasters in the upper ranks, but recruiting wise, I don't think I've been able to get anyone a loadmaster job in over 2 years. They come out of "open" contracts in BMT.
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Old 11-10-2017, 05:08 PM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
Be careful going to the doctor for the vertigo. If they say it "MIGHT BE XYZ" you're going to have to get properly evaluated by specialists on everything it might possibly be. Your primary care doctor is NOT going to be able to diagnose a past episode of vertigo. It could be an inner ear issue, so now you have to go to an ENT. It could be blood sugar, so now you need to be evaluated for diabetes. It could be a tumor, so go see a neurologist. I could go on and on and on. If it wasn't bad enough to go to the ER or reoccurring, let it go.

Corrective lenses are fine as long as your RX isn't more than +/- 8.

For your hand, you would be disqualified if you have any of these conditions:
(5) Fingers and Thumb (726.4). Inability to clench fist, pick up a pin, grasp an object, or
touch tips of at least three fingers with thumb
c. Residual Weakness and Pain. Current disease, injury, or congenital condition with
residual weakness or symptoms that prevents satisfactory performance of duty, including but not
limited to chronic joint pain associated with the shoulder (719.41), the upper arm (719.42), the
forearm (719.43), and the hand (719.44); or chronic joint pain as a late effect of fracture of the
upper extremities (905.2), as a late effect of sprains without mention of injury (905.7), and as late
effects of tendon injury (905.8).
I've done some research regarding the vertigo and noticed it may be an inner ear issue. I am just worried that perhaps something happens while in the military and it harms my career or they question why I hadn't cleared it up before. Thanks for the info on hand disqualifications, that was my biggest worry.
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Old 11-10-2017, 05:11 PM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
You might want to skip that loadmaster thing. Stepping out onto the jump platform preparatory to turning the paratroop door over to the jumpmaster is no time to be dealing with vertigo.

Although, dmarie123, I am curious as to the need for C-130 loadmasters and loadmasters in general today. I do remember when AF personnel from overmanned fields were forced into undermanned fields, including loadmaster.
To be honest, I am not worried regarding the vertigo. It was always very minor and only happened when I would be laying in bed. I've had my share of physically demanding activities and never had issues while not in bed. Anyhow, loadmaster looks like something I'd likely have to cross train to regardless
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Old 11-10-2017, 05:26 PM
 
30 posts, read 8,628 times
Reputation: 33
I've been reading up a lot of recent military news articles lately and don't really understand why the Air Force lacks so many pilots. Isn't it something that many people joining are interested in? I understand how airline jobs may pay more, but is that the largest issue being faced? It sounds really concerning considering the Air Force revolves around aircraft.

I like to question or learn about certain things, so after reading all about it and seeing quotes such as "there is no one solution" I've been thinking why doesn't the Air Force add incentives? Have Airmen cross train for large bonuses or maybe even promotions??

Also, would it be a bad idea to consider having pilot be an enlisted career instead of officer? I mean, if national security is at potential risk, is someone who went to college for 4 years more qualified than someone who didn't? Considering essentially nothing from those 4 years would be useful, it just seems like a rational idea to me as it could bring more people in for pilot..
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