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Old 12-09-2017, 12:54 PM
 
11,930 posts, read 11,510,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
What is the jail setup and the justice system like aboard a sub?
The justice system is the same as throughout the Navy, nothing special because being on a submarine.

As for jail, never thought about it, never had any incident that would require someone to be physically confined. I am thinking they would use the wardroom as a jail cell though as it is easy to secure and guard and is the most non-essential room on board (for the Ohio class that is). Maybe the supply room, but that is more essential, even underway, than the wardroom.
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
What is the jail setup and the justice system like aboard a sub?
There is no brig. There are storerooms that are lockable, that could be converted to serve as a brig if needed. In my 20 years I have never seen a storeroom used as a brig.

Brigs require a guard. To provide a round-the-clock guard requires 3 men. To send one guy to a brig means that 4 men come off the watchbill.

We have the regular non-judicial-punishment system that all the military uses. Most matters are handled by the chiefs [LPOs], if the chiefs think something is more important then the case is sent to the XO to review whether it is significant enough to be brought before the CO.

If it is too minor for the CO than the COB [Chief of the Boat] could handle it himself. Surface ships have a CMC [Command Master Chief] who does that function.

Boats I have served on the COBs rarely got involved with punishment. Though it is my understanding that on surface ships the CMCs are very active in that area.

I went to CO's mast once. I was young and dumb doing stuff that was illegal, though I had been encouraged to do it by my co-workers and my chief. My chief stood up for me in front of the CO and explained that he knew what I was doing and that he should have stopped me. In light of my Cheif's testimony, I was found guilty, though my sentence was suspended.

If a crewmember is seen to be a threat to himself or to the crew then he will be medically restrained until the boat can get rid of him.
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:09 PM
 
11,930 posts, read 11,510,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
The justice system is the same as throughout the Navy, nothing special because being on a submarine.

As for jail, never thought about it, never had any incident that would require someone to be physically confined. I am thinking they would use the wardroom as a jail cell though as it is easy to secure and guard and is the most non-essential room on board (for the Ohio class that is). Maybe the supply room, but that is more essential, even underway, than the wardroom.
I forgot about the crew break room; they could use that also, but I do not know if they (being the CO, XO, COB, etc) would remove the crews use of a break room so officers could have a place of their own to eat, at least not on the commands I have served under. But yea, the crew break room is another area that I could see being used to confine someone.
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
11,014 posts, read 2,108,983 times
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Thank you for the reply...

I can imagine they'd want to get rid of anyone that had claustrophobia or mental health issues not detected during boot camp.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I bet they all came back wearing dark glasses too [after a few years at-sea we tend to become photo-sensitive and loose the ability to focus long-distances].

Every year the Navy tests our hearing to track our hearing losses. Over broad spectrum our hearing is fine, but when tested specifically at 60 hz and 400 hz, we suck.

Unfortunately the VA only considers broad spectrum hearing loss to be a 'disability'.





One time I had a 'panic attack' of claustrophobia, it is a long story. Buy a fella a drink sometime and I may tell you about it.

I have seen other crewmen who were 'medically restrained' until we could surface to get rid of them. Doc lets them up once/day so they can use the toilet, eat and make a slow guided tour around the boat before Doc takes them back to their rack.

On a 'good' patrol nobody cracks. When someone does, they come off the watchbill. So their division goes from 3 section duty to 2 section or port/starboard, then they are 6 hours on and 6 hours off, for months.

If you lose too many crewmembers, you go into Port/Re-port. You stand a 6 hour shift at one watchstation then you get relieved to go stand at another watchstation. 12 on and 6 off, or 18 on and 6 off. I have spent many months doing Port/Re-port.

Subs stink. No question. My wife insisted that all my patrol uniforms be kept in the garage. There are odors that sink into the fabric that can never be washed out. My at-sea seabag was always kept packed and outside. I could bring it 'in' to wash/dry, but then it had to stay outside. I can not honestly smell it. But she can.

Anything that I have taken on patrol, she can smell it.
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
11,014 posts, read 2,108,983 times
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Probably every sea accident gets your attention.


[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
They come back all haggard looking because nukes have the toughest job on the boat. The drill, drill, and rill some more, constant training, and constant maintenance, it by far is the toughest job on the boat, I would never want to do it. It was a running joke about how old nukes looked.

As for oxygen, do not know what their strategy was behind oxygen, but I do not think it had anything to do with fire. I think it is difficult to maintain a balance if being submerged for a while without ventilating, they do oxygen bleeds sometimes also to bump it up. I am sure they have a target range they keep it at, not too high (which would cause a fire risk), not too low.



I never one time had the "I might not get back home" feeling. I honestly felt perfectly safe I very relaxed during my time on board. I have tons of confidence in the boat and training of the crew, and while I was not complacent, I was not ever feeling like something could occur.

As for others, I do feel for not only them, but any naval vessel, like the two US destroyer collisions this past summer. But I find my self really trying to dig for info and analyze everything about it as if I am investigating the incident.
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
11,014 posts, read 2,108,983 times
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Submariner, thanks for responding.

Do you have uneasy feelings as you go below??? Or have you ever??




OTE=Submariner;50355445]There is no brig. There are storerooms that are lockable, that could be converted to serve as a brig if needed. In my 20 years I have never seen a storeroom used as a brig.

Brigs require a guard. To provide a round-the-clock guard requires 3 men. To send one guy to a brig means that 4 men come off the watchbill.

We have the regular non-judicial-punishment system that all the military uses. Most matters are handled by the chiefs [LPOs], if the chiefs think something is more important then the case is sent to the XO to review whether it is significant enough to be brought before the CO.

If it is too minor for the CO than the COB [Chief of the Boat] could handle it himself. Surface ships have a CMC [Command Master Chief] who does that function.

Boats I have served on the COBs rarely got involved with punishment. Though it is my understanding that on surface ships the CMCs are very active in that area.

I went to CO's mast once. I was young and dumb doing stuff that was illegal, though I had been encouraged to do it by my co-workers and my chief. My chief stood up for me in front of the CO and explained that he knew what I was doing and that he should have stopped me. In light of my Cheif's testimony, I was found guilty, though my sentence was suspended.

If a crewmember is seen to be a threat to himself or to the crew then he will be medically restrained until the boat can get rid of him.[/quote]
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Old 12-09-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,203 posts, read 46,395,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Thank you for the reply...

I can imagine they'd want to get rid of anyone that had claustrophobia or mental health issues not detected during boot camp.
True claustrophobia is rare, and will normally be detected in the screening process.

I have seen crewmen who became violent within their first couple patrols.

I had a chief once who suffered a mental breakdown after a dozen patrols. That chief seemed to be much better after he got home, so we brought him with us on the next patrol after that. But nobody ever trusted him again, the doc always made a point of checking on him every day and had a lot of long talks with him.



Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Submariner, thanks for responding.

Do you have uneasy feelings as you go below??? Or have you ever??
No, but we do mess with the newbies a lot.

There are places where we can tie a taut string 'athwartships' from one side of the hull to the other side. When the boat is on the surface, the hull is relaxed. But as we submerge the hull compresses. So the string could be taut when we are on the surface, and at depth the string will be slack. That may freak-out newbies.
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Old 12-09-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Southwest
1,467 posts, read 870,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I have seen crewmen who became violent within their first couple patrols.

I had a chief once who suffered a mental breakdown after a dozen patrols. That chief seemed to be much better after he got home, so we brought him with us on the next patrol after that. But nobody ever trusted him again, the doc always made a point of checking on him every day and had a lot of long talks with him.


What specifically causes them to crack?
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Old 12-09-2017, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Western MN
826 posts, read 433,719 times
Reputation: 1516
Interesting read.
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Old 12-09-2017, 03:27 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
30,897 posts, read 37,565,982 times
Reputation: 38658
There are two Navy specialties that normal people can't figure out why anyone would do, submarines and aviation. Under the sea and controlled crashes.

I could never wrap my head around subs. A couple friends who were in subs can't wrap their heads around airplanes.
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