U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,215 posts, read 44,505,387 times
Reputation: 15263

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington Steel View Post
How is the food? Is like buffet style? All you can eat? Snacks in between? If you catch a craving for a sandwich in the middle of the night, can you go to the mess hall (or whatever it's called) and grab a bite?

What about entertainment such as movies, internet, etc. during off-duty time?
On Boomers we use a 6-week menu, in mid-patrol the crew meets and discusses the menu. The doc approves it and back in-port a nutritionist will review it. After 6-weeks it just repeats.

A meal is served every 6 hours. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and mid-rats.

Food is served for one hour, the first half will have the on-coming watch section eating before go on-watch. The second half will be the off-going watch-section. Each group has 30-minutes to get it, eat and get out.

There is often a soup urn left out for stragglers to eat, and maybe stuff for sandwiches.

Eating too much is a much worse problem, rather than not getting enough to eat.

Some crews will have pizza day once a week, where different divisions will rotate through doing the cooking. So one week E-div will cook the pizzas, and next week SONAR will cook the pizza, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:36 AM
 
Location: St Paul, MN
333 posts, read 144,553 times
Reputation: 599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I have seen other crewmen who were 'medically restrained' until we could surface to get rid of them. Doc lets them up once/day so they can use the toilet, eat and make a slow guided tour around the boat before Doc takes them back to their rack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
If a crewmember is seen to be a threat to himself or to the crew then he will be medically restrained until the boat can get rid of him.

Thank you for sharing your experience Submariner.

I was wondering if you could share more about what “medically restrained” means. Are they medicated? Does the doc keep watch? They remain in their rack the duration of the deployment?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,215 posts, read 44,505,387 times
Reputation: 15263
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsBall View Post
Thank you for sharing your experience Submariner.

I was wondering if you could share more about what “medically restrained” means. Are they medicated? Does the doc keep watch? They remain in their rack the duration of the deployment?
Doc gives them drugs. They are allowed to leave their rack once/day, with Doc at their side they will tour the boat and talk generally to everyone, then a visit to the toilet, and the messdecks for a meal, then ending at their rack for more drugs.

In my 17 patrols I saw this happen 3 times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
28,896 posts, read 34,919,945 times
Reputation: 35469
I think that's a problem on a lot of ships, not just sub's. I don't know about now but back when I was in, 35 years ago, there was at least one mess operating 24 hours a day on a carrier. Breakfast was around the clock.

Now, you're also feeding 5000 people on a flattop compared to what on a sub, 120 give or take?

My son in law has told me the food is not nearly as good or plentiful today as he's heard about from years ago. Then again, he just made Chief and just smiled when I asked him about the Chief's Mess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 10:49 AM
 
Location: USA
6,238 posts, read 5,013,446 times
Reputation: 4308
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
There are two Navy specialties that normal people can't figure out why anyone would do, submarines and aviation. Under the sea and controlled crashes.

I could never wrap my head around subs. A couple friends who were in subs can't wrap their heads around airplanes.
I'd rather be in an airplane, doing night, bad weather, ILS approaches to minimums than spend six months in a sub. I just think the routine would get monotonous, but a lot of military jobs are like that. I commend all who served, on subs, and elsewhere. Interesting thread!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
4,108 posts, read 1,981,891 times
Reputation: 7538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
I'd rather be in an airplane, doing night, bad weather, ILS approaches to minimums than spend six months in a sub. I just think the routine would get monotonous, but a lot of military jobs are like that. I commend all who served, on subs, and elsewhere. Interesting thread!
Not only that, but the [C-130] view is much nicer at 25,000 feet than it is at 500 feet below sea level.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
7,112 posts, read 522,425 times
Reputation: 10631
Oh no...glad you weren't severely injured. Working with cracked ribs under pressure would seem impossible.

This is exactly what I was hoping for with the thread, thanks

There must be many "incidents" over a duty period...

Glad you finally got your leave....so very important to get off the sub and home.





/B]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Submarines are a hazardous environment. The hazards alone may kill us, living among so many hazards can be stressful.

There are gases that may escape and kill us [ocean water going into the battery well will release Chlorine gas]. I have been in flooding incidents.

There are high voltages all around us. A friend was electrocuted while testing voltages on the reactor control breakers.

3600psi hydraulic systems that form leaks [the leaking fluids have enough force to slice you in half].

There are many systems exposed to full sea-pressure, leaks can be 'bad'.

I have been in fires underwater.

On my first boat 4 crewmen were killed when a civilian crane operator dropped a pallet of food on them, as they stood topside with their seabags in hand waiting to walk across the brow to go home.



American submarine hulls are flexible like spring steel, as we go deep our hulls compress. Decks can not be solid mounted, they must be hung from shock absorbers, to stay flexible.

One time I had to make repairs to the 'back-plain' of a mainframe computer. To access it, I had to climb into the framebays and come down between piping, into the back of the computer, suspended upside down. While I was soldering wires a soviet sub was detected and we had to go much deeper to avoid being detected. As we went deeper, our hull compressed and the pipes that I was fitted between pinned me. They cracked some of my ribs and prevented me from being able to expand my ribs to inhale. My coworkers were watching test signals and tried to get me to focus on finishing the solder job, but I had a difficult time with the pain and not being able to breathe. After a while the soviet sub left the area, we were able to return to a shallow depth and the pipes released me. That incident caused me some mental anguish over the image of being crushed.



On my last boat, I had reached my 'Planned Rotation Date' [PRD] and I had orders to shore duty, when my chief pulled strings to cancel my orders, intending to keep me on-board for another patrol. It is a trick they can use called 'involuntarily extending you onboard until further notice'. We had an argument that went on for a few weeks. I think he enjoyed taunting me over it. Eventually I assaulted him, the entire crew knew the backstory and the CO refused to mast me. I was given another set of orders to shore duty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
7,112 posts, read 522,425 times
Reputation: 10631
I guess not all medical protocol is followed at sea! No MD would try that here, I don't think

You guys are the epitome of pranksters.


[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Usually submariners love to pull pranks on each other.

Pseudo-weight gain is a good one. It starts when you tell a guy that he looks like he has put on some weight. Then spread the word around, soon everyone is telling him the same thing. When we go to sleep everyone hangs their coveralls by their rack, access it and trim the length of his belt by 1/4 inch. Repeat this part every day for a week. As his belt gets tighter and everyone keeps telling him that he is packing on the weight, at the end of a week the man will really increase his workout routine. Doc will usually step in right after the cooks put the guy on reduced rations.

But then again Doc has some of the best pranks. They stock pills that can turn your urine to any color of the rainbow, and the only reason they stock that stuff is to prank people. Doc can seriously mess with someone after their urine has gone from green to bright red.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 12:26 PM
 
343 posts, read 234,874 times
Reputation: 629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
I'd rather be in an airplane, doing night, bad weather, ILS approaches to minimums than spend six months in a sub. I just think the routine would get monotonous, but a lot of military jobs are like that. I commend all who served, on subs, and elsewhere. Interesting thread!
It could be monotonous .............. I remember being submerged for 6 weeks with another 6 weeks to go. When you are 20 years old it felt like an eternity as you watched the second hand sweep on the key-wound ship's clock. At my age now I don't return phone calls for 12 weeks and my cohorts don't bat an eye.


Although the boredom was occasionally punctuated with some seawater in the battery well, a ping from a Kara-class cruiser (more like a sledge hammer hitting the hull then a ping), or perhaps a Christmas meal of beef wellington.


Its funny how we are all different. Just the thought of flying in bad weather makes me ill, while sub life was all-in-all relaxing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2017, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,169 posts, read 3,796,815 times
Reputation: 4961
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Not only that, but the [C-130] view is much nicer at 25,000 feet than it is at 500 feet below sea level.


But the view is much better having just left the safety and comfort of that AC 130 on a jump forward. Airborne!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top