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Old 12-15-2017, 09:04 AM
 
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Been watching classic episodes of MASH. Something I noticed is they had the oldest junior enlisted soldiers. For those who served in that era, what things about this show you felt were accurate or totally wrong?
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Old 12-15-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Been watching classic episodes of MASH. Something I noticed is they had the oldest junior enlisted soldiers. For those who served in that era, what things about this show you felt were accurate or totally wrong?
I did not serve in ROK during that era, however I did serve two tours in in 1972 and 1984.

The TV series was all filmed in California...
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Old 12-15-2017, 09:20 AM
 
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I'm thinking the real soldiers who served in Korea did not have anyway near so much fun.

Walessp
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Old 12-15-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: USA
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Originally Posted by walessp View Post
I'm thinking the real soldiers who served in Korea did not have anyway near so much fun.

Walessp
Ironically Allan Alda served as a U.S. Army gunnery officer during the Korean War.

https://www.military.com/veteran-job...alan-alda.html
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Old 12-15-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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as a member of 502nd M*A*S*H can't say there were any similarities - well, maybe there was.....we had our share of loose women, officious pricks like Frank Burns, and a physician or two who got themselves in trouble.



https://www.rand.org/pubs/monograph_...773.chap3.html
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Old 12-15-2017, 03:48 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Default A lack of knowlege of the materiel, I suppose

I've always thought Fr. Mulcahy was an odd person in MASH. The Jesuits I've known were much more worldly than the Mulcahy portrayal. (Plus, there were no Jesuits in Korea until after the Korean war - see World History Connected | Vol. 10 No. 3 | Franklin D. Rausch: The Jesuits in Korea: Influence without Presence - although the Jesuits were active in Japan & China - Asia generally, practically from their founding in 1540)

More typical of the Jesuits would have been that Mulcahy would have learned Korean (& maybe Japanese & Chinese - the major dialect, @ least) - the Jesuits were (are still?) linguists & sociologists & translators & teachers & whatever other requirements there might be. Very bright, & I would have thought that Fr. Mulcahy would have smoked cigars, drunk scotch & been an excellent poker player.

I've read that Mulcahy was supposed to be a quirkier version than the priest in the original movie. I think they could have gone with a better understanding of the Jesuits, but MASH was a kind of comedy/satire. & so let it go - but it was a teachable moment.
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Old 12-15-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
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Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Been watching classic episodes of MASH. Something I noticed is they had the oldest junior enlisted soldiers. For those who served in that era, what things about this show you felt were accurate or totally wrong?
I had a Korean friend in college backs in the 80s. His parents were in Korea during that conflict and moved to the USA. They both did not like M.A.S.H. They complained it was too fake. I was an 80s teen, and my friend was very Americanized. He did not really speak Korean - mostly English. But his parents were from that era - South Koreans who escaped the aftermath of war.

As for me, I was a big fan of the comedy. Off the top of my memory I recall some great scenes:
* Colonel Flag banging his head into a wooden box to fake an injury
* Colonel Flag escaping like the "wind" by diving through the window when Pierce says "The wind broke its leg".
* Hullahan: "Get your married face out of here Frank."
* Klinger dressed as the Statue of Liberty for McAurther's visit.
* Klinger building a weird gyroplane to fly away - Trapper said "Did you guys see that big ugly bird?"
* Father Mulcahy getting drunk at an anti-binge drinking sermon - "Did I ever tell you about the prodigal son?"

I had relatives who served in that war long before I was born. They said it was hell and suffered badly from PTSD.
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Old 12-15-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Elysium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
I've always thought Fr. Mulcahy was an odd person in MASH. The Jesuits I've known were much more worldly than the Mulcahy portrayal. (Plus, there were no Jesuits in Korea until after the Korean war - see World History Connected | Vol. 10 No. 3 | Franklin D. Rausch: The Jesuits in Korea: Influence without Presence - although the Jesuits were active in Japan & China - Asia generally, practically from their founding in 1540)

More typical of the Jesuits would have been that Mulcahy would have learned Korean (& maybe Japanese & Chinese - the major dialect, @ least) - the Jesuits were (are still?) linguists & sociologists & translators & teachers & whatever other requirements there might be. Very bright, & I would have thought that Fr. Mulcahy would have smoked cigars, drunk scotch & been an excellent poker player.

I've read that Mulcahy was supposed to be a quirkier version than the priest in the original movie. I think they could have gone with a better understanding of the Jesuits, but MASH was a kind of comedy/satire. & so let it go - but it was a teachable moment.
I may be missing something because of a lack of knowledge about Catholic Church organization but Father Mulcahy was also a US Army Chaplin.
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,636 posts, read 4,352,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
I've always thought Fr. Mulcahy was an odd person in MASH. The Jesuits I've known were much more worldly than the Mulcahy portrayal. (Plus, there were no Jesuits in Korea until after the Korean war - see World History Connected | Vol. 10 No. 3 | Franklin D. Rausch: The Jesuits in Korea: Influence without Presence - although the Jesuits were active in Japan & China - Asia generally, practically from their founding in 1540)

More typical of the Jesuits would have been that Mulcahy would have learned Korean (& maybe Japanese & Chinese - the major dialect, @ least) - the Jesuits were (are still?) linguists & sociologists & translators & teachers & whatever other requirements there might be. Very bright, & I would have thought that Fr. Mulcahy would have smoked cigars, drunk scotch & been an excellent poker player.

I've read that Mulcahy was supposed to be a quirkier version than the priest in the original movie. I think they could have gone with a better understanding of the Jesuits, but MASH was a kind of comedy/satire. & so let it go - but it was a teachable moment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
I may be missing something because of a lack of knowledge about Catholic Church organization but Father Mulcahy was also a US Army Chaplin.
Taiko I quite agree with you. Just because he was Jesuit he was first and foremost an army chaplain. I remember him having some skill with the language in the show as he was involved with orphanages in the area the unit was based at.

An army chaplain can be of any religion. They must though be able to perform services in all religions. I have served with two Jewish chaplains, a chaplain who was Islamic and countless Christian sects to include a Jesuit as well.

Christian Koreans also by in large follow aspects of Buddhism as well. They might not go through all the motions as a Buddhist but family traditions are followed and many of them have Buddhist beginnings. This I know as a soldier who married a South Korean woman and adopted her entire family or rather they adopted me LOL.
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Old 12-16-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Default A much wider perspective

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
I may be missing something because of a lack of knowledge about Catholic Church organization but Father Mulcahy was also a US Army Chaplin.
Yah, that's one of the things that's weird about Fr. Mulcahy (the portrayal). The Jesuits have a very long history in Asia, including Japan & China. Outside of purely military (& medical) matters, Mulcahy should have had the best preparation for serving in Korea - culture, language, indigenous religions, customs - if only from internal Jesuit documentation & libraries & etc.

Yes, towards the middle of the show's run, Mulcahy turns out to have learned some of the culture, local marriage customs, attitudes towards foreigners, attitudes towards mixed-race babies, Korean language. To me, it's odd that he didn't have the language down before he ever got there, @ least the survival version - & steadily improved performance in the language (lots of opportunities to practice, & practical reasons to do so).

Yah, his function on base was Army Chaplin. But the Jesuits are expected to take advantage of every opportunity to study & learn. Korea had to have been a logical follow-on to the work the order had done throughout Asia, & looking through the history, apparently the first Korean converts to Christianity sought out Jesuit missionary priests in China to study with & join the religion.
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