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Old 12-16-2017, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Florida -
7,580 posts, read 8,873,643 times
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OP: You didn't say what your Bachelor's degree is in; I suspect it is not education, since you are still working as a substitute, but that may be due to your location or the time of year you started (?). Since you left law school at 28, one might assume two things: (1) You have about 4-5-years unaccounted for, during which you made no progress toward a long-term career; (2) Law is not your thing. Given these assumptions, you are now about 7-8-years behind most young college grads with a Bachelor's degree.

The upside is that you have your college degree and are actively seeking a solid career path; plus you are single and flexibly able to take a different direction. The downside is that you will be in an even more difficult situation if you further postpone your career another 4-years (military). The military is a great place for young people to get your feet on the ground and get started in life, ... but, it also largely takes things out of your hands. (How old was the police officer who recommended that you join the military? ... and was his perspective based on coming out of the military prepared to be a police officer? -- While an admirable profession, that route will be somewhat closed to you by age 34-35 when you get out).

Before committing yourself to the military until you are 34-35, it would be worthwhile to seek-out a professional career counselor who can help you more objectively evaluate the possibilities - based on your degree and experience. Unlike law school, if you decide after 1-2-years that the military is not for you, you cannot simply drop-out. You should also do some online or library-based Occupational Aptitude Testing to identify other fields where people with your interests and skills are working.
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Old 12-16-2017, 01:32 PM
 
3,115 posts, read 2,924,552 times
Reputation: 7024
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMONAH2 View Post
I am a single 30 year old female (no children) with a Bachelors degree and a year of law school. I left law school a year and a half ago and I am now a substitute teacher. I won't lie in saying I am feeling a little down with the lack of career accomplishments. I was talking to a police officer and he told me that I should join the service. I thought it a great idea and I am talking to all branches except Marines because I am too old now to join. I am making sure I get all my information before I make such a big decision. I told my family and they are against it and not supported about me wanting to join (THEY ARE INSISTENT that I am taking steps backwards, am I?). I am feeling a little conflicted. I want to join, I certainly want to complete my education and finally be on a career path. I am hearing both sides of the good and bad and was wondering if anyone can give me their opinion and/or similar situation? Of course I want to support my country (since I really wanted to join after high school but parents put a stop to it), and also utilize all the benefits the military has to offer (medical, school, bonuses, etc.) BUT mostly I want to make such that this will set me off on a career path.
OP,

When I was your age, I looked into military reserves, and I regret to this day that I didn't follow through and join. So I would encourage you to look into it seriously.

But you're you, and in the end, you have to be happy with your decisions; no one else including your family can tell you what makes you happy and fulfilled.

Military people will tell you it's what you make of it. There's lots of excellent training opportunities, interesting people, and good benefits.

Just keep in mind that at some point, you might be put in harm's way, because in the end, that's what the military is for.
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,349 posts, read 44,679,169 times
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I served with guys who enlisted in their 30s and they did fine.

Tell us about the specific programs that recruiters are offering you.
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:57 PM
 
5,302 posts, read 4,163,072 times
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My brother's way through law school was paid for by the Air Force. He became a JAG after he got his JD, and served active duty for 8 years ( I think they are only required to serve 5 if the AF pays for their schooling - you'd have to look into this.) He LOVED his job! The only thing he didn't like is that they never sent him overseas, and he wanted to go. After his active duty he joined the reserves and did that for many years.

Not only did he enjoy his job, but it set him up financially for life. During his 8 years, he received not only a salary, but also a living allowance (not sure exactly what that is called?) He lived only on his living allowance and saved ALL of his salary for 8 straight years!!! When he got out, he was able to buy a house for cash, get married in great financial circumstances, and put a lot into investments.

Really, the Air Force was great for him!

The only thing bad about it was that he started smoking while in the Service. Don't know why, other than peer pressure, maybe.
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Old 12-18-2017, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
26,524 posts, read 22,273,445 times
Reputation: 12979
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMONAH2 View Post
I am a single 30 year old female (no children) with a Bachelors degree and a year of law school. I left law school a year and a half ago and I am now a substitute teacher. I won't lie in saying I am feeling a little down with the lack of career accomplishments. I was talking to a police officer and he told me that I should join the service. I thought it a great idea and I am talking to all branches except Marines because I am too old now to join. I am making sure I get all my information before I make such a big decision. I told my family and they are against it and not supported about me wanting to join (THEY ARE INSISTENT that I am taking steps backwards, am I?). I am feeling a little conflicted. I want to join, I certainly want to complete my education and finally be on a career path. I am hearing both sides of the good and bad and was wondering if anyone can give me their opinion and/or similar situation? Of course I want to support my country (since I really wanted to join after high school but parents put a stop to it), and also utilize all the benefits the military has to offer (medical, school, bonuses, etc.) BUT mostly I want to make such that this will set me off on a career path.
At 30 yrs of age, I'd only recommend a program that allows you to enter the service as an officer. I have nothing against being enlisted (I was one for 3 yrs before becoming an officer as an Army Nurse), but as someone entering the service at at a slightly older, more educated person, being a lower enlisted Service Member can be a tougher adjustment.

Or perhaps if you did enter as an enlisted member, look at finding your way to becoming an officer as soon as you can (some sort of bootstrap program). Also, the Army has programs if I recall where they'd pay for law school if you qualified and became an Army lawyer.

I didn't read any of the other responses in this thread so maybe someone has given you good advice. I respect your thoughts of joining the military. Its a tougher adjustment, even for a mid-20s, early 30's person. In my corps (Army Nurse Corps) some of our highest ranking officers - including General Officers and Field Grade Officers - were direct commissionees who came in a little later in life and did extremely well as Army Officers (since they had the aptitude, drive, aspirations, motivation to succeed).
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Old 12-18-2017, 10:20 AM
 
3,929 posts, read 3,933,829 times
Reputation: 3791
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMONAH2 View Post
I am a single 30 year old female (no children) with a Bachelors degree and a year of law school. I left law school a year and a half ago and I am now a substitute teacher. I won't lie in saying I am feeling a little down with the lack of career accomplishments.
First post.

Welcome.

As others have mentioned there seems to be a few years gap in posting. Substitute teaching all of those years or something else?

Teaching. Most states have a waiver program and one can obtain a permanent position as a teacher. Then night school or Summer school to obtain education credits and obtain certification. Nothing in that direction?
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Old 12-18-2017, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
4,278 posts, read 2,060,653 times
Reputation: 7943
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
At 30 yrs of age, I'd only recommend a program that allows you to enter the service as an officer. I have nothing against being enlisted (I was one for 3 yrs before becoming an officer as an Army Nurse), but as someone entering the service at at a slightly older, more educated person, being a lower enlisted Service Member can be a tougher adjustment.

Or perhaps if you did enter as an enlisted member, look at finding your way to becoming an officer as soon as you can (some sort of bootstrap program). Also, the Army has programs if I recall where they'd pay for law school if you qualified and became an Army lawyer.

I didn't read any of the other responses in this thread so maybe someone has given you good advice. I respect your thoughts of joining the military. Its a tougher adjustment, even for a mid-20s, early 30's person. In my corps (Army Nurse Corps) some of our highest ranking officers - including General Officers and Field Grade Officers - were direct commissionees who came in a little later in life and did extremely well as Army Officers (since they had the aptitude, drive, aspirations, motivation to succeed).
Just be sure you get an iron-clad agreement. I met a young lady last night who was promised a slot in the next PA class if she would just enlist in the army now. She enlisted and never got her slot. Now she's an E-5 with a BS in nursing taking temps and checking blood pressure at sick call. Recruiters will tell you anything to get you to sign on the dotted line.
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:24 PM
 
Location: The wild horse filled region of Atropia.
78 posts, read 31,354 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Just be sure you get an iron-clad agreement. I met a young lady last night who was promised a slot in the next PA class if she would just enlist in the army now. She enlisted and never got her slot. Now she's an E-5 with a BS in nursing taking temps and checking blood pressure at sick call. Recruiters will tell you anything to get you to sign on the dotted line.
not all

There are specific recruiters and offices for things like that. Luckily it is all easily found on the internet now, but when I was a detailed recruiter (01-04) I would get folks all the time that had XYZ quals and wanted something that I knew the AMEDD, JAG, or Chaplain recruiter could offer better than I could. I would be the first guy referring them to the appropriate recruiter.

While I could have processed OCS or WOFT applicants, I always pre-qualed them, made a soft are you sure you want that program(despite some not being mentally, physically, or morally qualified) and pushed them off to the larger station in the state capitol 20 miles away. I had no energy to deal with that even though there were larger recruiter incentives(points). I was plenty happy working with the folks that wanted to jump out of planes, walk through the woods, and kill things, break people, build things, blow people up, or further enable those folks to do so. The bleed on the Flag so the stripes stay red type folks.
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Old 12-19-2017, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
545 posts, read 316,364 times
Reputation: 1595
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Just be sure you get an iron-clad agreement. I met a young lady last night who was promised a slot in the next PA class if she would just enlist in the army now. She enlisted and never got her slot. Now she's an E-5 with a BS in nursing taking temps and checking blood pressure at sick call. Recruiters will tell you anything to get you to sign on the dotted line.
There is no "iron-clad agreement" to get into any high-level educational program, and never has been. You can meet all the requirements for OCS and still not be selected. You can have the recommendations, test scores, and all pre-reqs, including documented 80 hours of shadowing a PA and still not get accepted. You can graduate from a BSN program and never pass your boards. Her guarantee would be acceptance into the Interservice Physician Assistant Program--an internet search reveals the process to apply. There is more to the story.
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Old 12-19-2017, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
26,524 posts, read 22,273,445 times
Reputation: 12979
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVREDLEG View Post
There is more to the story.
Definitely. I really like to see her degree. I knew some Associates Degree Registered Nurses working as medics. Army requires a BS-Nursing if I'm not wrong.

Any who - the medic has options if PA school didn't work out.
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