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Old 01-01-2018, 11:28 AM
 
Location: San Diego CA
3,707 posts, read 2,829,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I'm having a hard time coming up with anything funny about Marine Corps boot camp in 1973.
1966 and the Vietnam War. Trying to come up with something humorous . Coming up short.
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Old 01-01-2018, 11:51 AM
 
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Funny but at the same time rather sad.......

Ft. Sill. OK.

Day one of basic. myself and another DI were processing new arrivals. Most of the fresh fish had the usual "what the hell have I got myself into?" face, but there was these two guys that were actually SMILING the whole time we were issuing uniforms and other supplies. I am wondering what drug they were high on. Smiling during exercising. Smiling in the chow line. And still smiling at lights out.

Well, the drug they were high on was escape from poverty . Abject poverty.

That is, this was the first time in their 18-19 year old lives that they're wearing newclothes. New shoes. Underwear of any kind. A guaranteed three square meals a day. And ending the day sleeping in their bunk ALONE! Without having to share it with two or three siblings.

Needless to say all the charges with that history were busting their humps to make sure history does not repeat.........
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:41 PM
 
Location: USA
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I was assigned to Wilford Hall, a 1,000 bed hospital on the permanent duty side of Lackland AFB. This was ‘77 to ‘80. I worked the evening shift at the hospital and frequently, we wanted to eat when our shift ended.

There were two options: the cafeteria in the hospital and the cafeteria where incoming basic trainees had their first meal of their USAF career. The instructors always had them exercising, playing “pick-em up/put-em down” with their bags and other various duties which never failed to entertain.

We called it “dinner & a floorshow” and typically hit that cafateria at least twice a week!
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Old 01-04-2018, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Rathdrum, ID
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I "ran away" from home about a half year after high school graduation. Not sure if I technically "ran away" since I was 18 and a legal adult. After some months, I ran out of money and was not ready to go home, so I joined the Navy at Portland, OR.

Talking to the recruiter, I told him that I wanted to be in the Lithographer rating, of which I knew the Navy had. He told me, "Okay. Just tell let them know when you get to boot camp and they will set you up." Took the physical, signed the papers, and hopped onto a PSA flight to San Diego. Those were the days when the PSA stewardesses wore those pink hot pants, (1970).

During the course of boot camp, we took those aptitude/IQ tests. Can't remember exactly, but it seems that they took two full days, maybe just one, to complete. About a week later, we sat down with the classifier to determine what job we would be doing for the Navy. (At that time, I did not know about the 'school guarantee' program.)

We sat down together and he spends a few minutes going over my test results. Looks up and says, "What do you think about submarines?" I'm thinking, "Hmmm? Best food in the Navy. A sub is big enough to have a printing press." Was a little concerned about how I would fit, (I'm 6'3" tall.). I respond, "Submarines? They're okay . . . I guess."

Then he asks, "What do you think about electronics?" I'm thinking about the crystal radios I built as a adolescent and taking apart old televisions to pull the tubes out and taking them to Thrifty's to see if they were any good. I ask him, "Why are you asking?"

He says, "Well, because we're thinking of sending you to either nuclear school or electronics technician school. But we will have to ask you to extend your enlistment by two years because the schools themselves are two and a half year long and we need to get a return on our investment for your schooling."

I said, "I want to be a Lithographer and the recruiter said to tell you know and you'll 'set me up'". He looks at me sadly and with a gentle hand on my shoulder and says, "I'm sorry son. That's not the way it works."

Boy, I was angry. No way was I going to give them those extra two years. (Life mistake Number 2. If I went to nuc school or ET school, I would have been "set for life". (Life mistake Number 1 was 'running away' from home without telling my parents.))

I declined. He spent a few minutes shuffling and looking at the papers and assigned me to a school/rating. At that time, it was the Radarman rating, which was changed to Operations Specialist while I was serving my enlistment. It was an interesting rating and I'm glad I did that particular job for my country and fellow sailors.

p.s. My parents came to by boot camp graduation. My mom said, "The Navy did for you in twelve weeks what I've been trying to do for eighteen years."
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Old 01-04-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Rathdrum, ID
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Boot Camp story number 2.

During the course of boot camp, we participated in the Athletic Weekend. Our company competed against other companies going through boot camp at the same time.

Everybody in the company had to participate in something. I was a pretty klutzy teenager. I was tall and very skinny. However, I had been riding bicycles all my life and ran the high hurdles for three years during high school. I was still pretty awkward, but in pretty good physical shape.

Thinking I would do the least amount of damage, I was assigned to run the second leg of an 880 yard relay race, (two laps around the track). I only had to run half a lap.

I took the baton from the first runner near the back of the pack. Second to last, I think. Ran off and by the middle of the turn, I had caught everybody and exited the turn in front. By the time I came to the baton hand-off lane, I was a good twenty yards in front of everyone else.

Only problem was that since everyone thought I wasn't any good, the third man on our team was looking for me at the back of the pack. I was holding out the baton in front of me and ran right into him! He sprawled on the ground that way. I went this way, and the baton went an entirely different direction.

Boy, was I ticked! And I let my teammate know, yelling and screaming. The Chief who was officiating said, "I don't blame you, son, for being angry." If I had my whits about me, I would have grabbed the baton and ran an extra half lap.

Funny thing is that our company still won the competition and our 'reward', besides being able to fly a little yellow pennant on our guide standard, was attendance at a Padre game where I caught a foul ball.

I was a more respected after that race. Someone who wasn't such a putz.
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Old 01-05-2018, 01:09 PM
 
17,643 posts, read 9,622,668 times
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At Lackland AFB back in 1972, our assistant TI was somewhat of a ladies's man. Even as he was marching us down the street, WAFs we'd pass would call out, "Heeeey, Jimmy!"

I was the dorm "house mouse." I was finishing up some administrative thing late one Friday night and barely got into my bunk as the lights went out. At some point during the night, I was awakened by Sgt Jimmy doing a check of "night displays" (our uniforms folded on a chair beside out lockers), coming down my row.

I could hear him in the dark and see dimly by the shielded flashlight he had (those plastic yellow-green wands). Whenever he didn't like a night display, I'd hear him cuss and hear the display whoosh across the room and slap the far wall.

He got to the bed next to mine. I heard him cuss, heard the "whoosh," then heard, "Rodgers, get yer head back down."

I poked my head up and saw Sgt Jimmy with another figure. I squinted and stared...that was a WAF next to him. "Kirk, get yer head back down."

I covered my head and went back to sleep.

First thing the next morning, I still had some administrative stuff to get done before either of the TIs got in, and so did our dorm chief. We opened the door of the little bedroom that connected to the office...and found Sgt Jimmy lying sound asleep on the floor beside the bunk, in his skivvies, head toward us.

Naturally, we both snapped to attention, right there in the doorway.

He woke up, sat up, looked around dazed for a moment, then noticed us standing behind him.

He muttered, "Oh, #@#$." Then he said, "Rogers...what...do you see...in that bunk?"

Rogers leaned over--still at attention--and said stiffly, "Peter trails. Sir."

Sgt Jimmy sighed. "Don't tell nobody about this!"
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Old 01-05-2018, 01:31 PM
 
17,643 posts, read 9,622,668 times
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We'd been at Lackland for about a month and had just done our first KP. One of the guys had scalded his fingers in the kitchen. He was sitting with me the next day at a table in the chowhall as a new flight of "rainbows" filed in.

"Rainbows" were brand new recruits who haven't been issued uniforms yet, so they're still dressed in all sorts of civilian colors.

One of the rainbows sits at the table with me, one of our flight's wise-azzes, the guy with totally bandaged fingers. He looks at the bandages, his eyes get wide, and he asks, "What happened to you?"

Our resident wise-azz quickly quips, "We were doing pushups and he didn't have his fingers at 45-degree angles, so the TI stomped on 'em."

I thought we might have to pick the rainbows eyes off the floor.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Southern California
953 posts, read 995,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I'm having a hard time coming up with anything funny about Marine Corps boot camp in 1973.
A friend of mine dated a Drill Instructor at MCRD San Diego in the 70's. He told her a recruit actually got off the bus carrying a golf bag full of clubs. The kid must have thought he could take in a little golf while visiting California.
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
5,693 posts, read 3,002,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simbared View Post
A friend of mine dated a Drill Instructor at MCRD San Diego in the 70's. He told her a recruit actually got off the bus carrying a golf bag full of clubs. The kid must have thought he could take in a little golf while visiting California.

That's the same time frame when I went to MCRD San Diego. It was a running joke at the time. Bring your golf clubs and sun glasses. Even today we're referred to as Hollywood Marines. I'll bet the DIs had some fun at that kid's expense!
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:14 PM
 
3,265 posts, read 4,546,581 times
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During basic training, one of the trainees was craving tobacco or nicotine, which was contraband. He had a friend from home, mail him several tins marked "boot polish", with the contents scraped out and replaced with Copenhagen tobacco. The sergeant opened the package and was puzzled why he trainee would need that much boot polish, but went ahead and let him have them, without inspecting the tins. The trainee had enough to satisfy himself as well as to sell samples to his buddies in camp for weeks to come, for a large sum.
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