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Old 02-12-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Can I serve active duty while getting and undergrad degree at the same time. Any options that you know would Ben helpful thanks
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:20 PM
 
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There are all kinds of opportunities to further your education while on active duty. University of Phoenix works with military and I know there are others. You'll get further in your military career by working on continuing education.
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Hard aground in the Sonoran Desert
4,508 posts, read 7,794,497 times
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Sure you can...I got my undergrad degree while on active duty. You need to be realistic in your expectations though. Most people that are new to the military (junior) are very busy and don't have a lot of free time for school. It becomes easier when you've been in a while and have established yourself.

Good luck!
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Old 02-12-2018, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Florida
3,172 posts, read 4,111,474 times
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It might also depend on which branch of service and the circumstances your unit is in.

It always seemed to me the Navy and AF were more supportive of civilian education than the Army was.

But I believe you can pursue a civilian education for the most part. Just don't expect to be a full time student. I had an NCO who came to speak with me about his education plan. He wanted to take 4 courses for 12 credit hours and I said there is no way he could come to work at the required days/times, go to class, do all the work for 12 credit hours, and balance family needs. He agreed and took less classes.

You will likely spend 2-4 hours doing work outside of class for each credit hour you're taking.

BTW, do not use your GI Bill while you're on active duty. Use tuition assistance, save that GI Bill for graduate school.
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:21 PM
 
5,871 posts, read 2,337,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Army_Guy View Post
It might also depend on which branch of service and the circumstances your unit is in.

It always seemed to me the Navy and AF were more supportive of civilian education than the Army was.

But I believe you can pursue a civilian education for the most part. Just don't expect to be a full time student. I had an NCO who came to speak with me about his education plan. He wanted to take 4 courses for 12 credit hours and I said there is no way he could come to work at the required days/times, go to class, do all the work for 12 credit hours, and balance family needs. He agreed and took less classes.

You will likely spend 2-4 hours doing work outside of class for each credit hour you're taking.

BTW, do not use your GI Bill while you're on active duty. Use tuition assistance, save that GI Bill for graduate school.
Considering most BS engineering degree programs are some where around 120-130 credit hours if someone is only taking 6 credits a semester that puts them on a 20 year plan, best case. How are people pulling this off at all while on active duty, even after they are established?

Or is it taking people 20 years to get the BS, retire from the military and then use the GI bill to get a masters and start a second career? With as much as the military moves you around how do you maintain educational continuity with a university, there is only so much transferring someone can do and that can get muddy about which schools are willing to transfer what etc, having to change to new degree catalogs and perhaps having new requirements pop up and have old classes that are no longer required etc.

I have always heard recruiters talking about "get your degree while you are in" but have never known anyone to have done this. I knew one guy who got a green to gold scholarship but thats full time student.
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Old 02-13-2018, 07:10 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Absolutely, the same way that college students work for an income. Here are the most recent stats on how many degrees people in each branch earn yearly. GO AIR FORCE considering we are relatively small compared to the Army. http://demo.dantespulse.com/_content...tSheetFY15.pdf
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Old 02-13-2018, 07:12 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,100 posts, read 9,001,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsflyer View Post
Considering most BS engineering degree programs are some where around 120-130 credit hours if someone is only taking 6 credits a semester that puts them on a 20 year plan, best case. How are people pulling this off at all while on active duty, even after they are established?

Or is it taking people 20 years to get the BS, retire from the military and then use the GI bill to get a masters and start a second career? With as much as the military moves you around how do you maintain educational continuity with a university, there is only so much transferring someone can do and that can get muddy about which schools are willing to transfer what etc, having to change to new degree catalogs and perhaps having new requirements pop up and have old classes that are no longer required etc.

I have always heard recruiters talking about "get your degree while you are in" but have never known anyone to have done this. I knew one guy who got a green to gold scholarship but thats full time student.
You've never known anyone, please see this link. The numbers who complete degrees are in the tens of thousands. http://demo.dantespulse.com/_content...tSheetFY15.pdf

Also, AF offers programs to allow you to STOP having work (while continuing to get some pay) and getting full scholarship for engineering (ASCP or AECP, google them), nursing (NECP), PA programs (IPAP), medical school (USUHS), law school (FLEP), and billion other programs like AFIT (Graduate degrees in engineering), SOAR (Regular bachelor's degrees) and many more.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:04 AM
 
280 posts, read 178,480 times
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Here's another very useful tip that I found immensely helpful when I was in the AF.

There are ways of testing out of nearly all the credits you'll need for the first two yrs of college. Plus, schools will also award you, usually elective, credits for courses the you already had to take just for being in the Air Force. That's Two yrs old college in less than six months depending on how you can schedule the tests

These are all perfectly legit, accredited testing credits not 'wallpaper' or whitewash.

Yes, you'll have to be smart enough to past the tests but I thought any reasonably good high school student can score high enough. I took all those tests 12 yrs after I left high school and found them not all that difficult for a reasonably educated adult.

Ask the recruiter about CLEP and Dantes tests. I've been out for a long time they might even have other options nowadays
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,308 posts, read 9,793,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsflyer View Post
Considering most BS engineering degree programs are some where around 120-130 credit hours if someone is only taking 6 credits a semester that puts them on a 20 year plan, best case. How are people pulling this off at all while on active duty, even after they are established?
6 credits a semester = 12 or 18 credits a year depending on if you do classes during the summer semester

120/12 = 10 years not 20!

Depending on the branch of military and what your job is, you'll have more free time for classes than others. My cousin physically attended the University of Delaware for a couple years on a part time basis. He was in the Air Force and his shifts were overnight normally so he had free time during the day. Now he has no free time....he's now married with 3 kids and in Alaska!
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:20 PM
 
1,191 posts, read 761,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
6 credits a semester = 12 or 18 credits a year depending on if you do classes during the summer semester

120/12 = 10 years not 20!

Depending on the branch of military and what your job is, you'll have more free time for classes than others. My cousin physically attended the University of Delaware for a couple years on a part time basis. He was in the Air Force and his shifts were overnight normally so he had free time during the day. Now he has no free time....he's now married with 3 kids and in Alaska!
Know your school's degree completion requirements as well. Some are open, some require coursework be completed within a given timeframe (such as seven years).

Also, declare your major. Once you are in a program, you and the college/university are in an agreement on what/which courses make up your degree. This is important as departments change programs from time-to-time and sometimes eliminate programs entirely. If you are actually declared, if the program makes changes you are still bound by the agreement you had (so the classes you have already completed count, should the new program add classes or eliminate some that you already completed) and if a program is eliminated, the college/university is much more likely to find a solution for you to complete your degree if you are already in a program.

Second scenario is rare but happens.

First scenario is more likely as programs are always undergoing changes to keep with the times, especially if a discipline with an accrediting body such as nursing or engineering, where the programs themselves need to be in alignment with the accrediting body (for example, ABET accredited engineering programs go through ABET accreditation review every seven years and may make program changes when renewed; if you are already in the program, you will not have anything new added because of possible new requirements added through renewal).

And if transferring anything in, ALWAYS get acceptance IN WRITING from the department head or undergraduate advisor before you start classes. What Professor Bob says is fine over the phone does not matter if he is no longer department head a year later. Even worse if Professor Bob went on a bender, blew up a lab and was denied tenure and is no longer at the school.
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