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Old 02-21-2018, 02:59 PM
 
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Worked in the engine room of a steam driven Navy ship. Some things we did include washing clothes in a bucket and hanging them out to dry around the engine or boiler, cooking a piece of meat on the boiler gage glass steal frame, using steam condensate to make instant coffee or cup-o-noodles, and the alcoholics made “bilge wine” and strained it through old rags before drinking.
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Old 02-21-2018, 04:58 PM
 
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In our Assault Helicopter Company we would heat our C-rats out in the field by holding the can with Channel Locks in the exhaust of our Huey as the engine was shut down. The timing was perfect as it would heat the food in a can without burning the hell out of it. This practice came to a end in our battalion when a newbie second lieutenant let a C-rat can roll down the exhaust into the turbine blades ruining the hot end of a engine. It was a expensive repair done out in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 02-21-2018, 05:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomC23 View Post
In our Assault Helicopter Company we would heat our C-rats out in the field by holding the can with Channel Locks in the exhaust of our Huey as the engine was shut down. The timing was perfect as it would heat the food in a can without burning the hell out of it. This practice came to a end in our battalion when a newbie second lieutenant let a C-rat can roll down the exhaust into the turbine blades ruining the hot end of a engine. It was a expensive repair done out in the middle of nowhere.
That reminds me of an incident in the marine troop berthing compartment of the ship I was on. A small section of the steam pipe insulation had been removed but not replaced yet due to lack of materials. Some Marines figured out they could sit a can of beens or ravioli on the remaining insulation next to the steam pipe to heat their meal. Good idea if they’d remembered to pop the lid first. Fans of beans exploded over their fresh clean sheets. We ended up patching the gap with whatever spare insulation material we had on hand to prevent them from doing that again.
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Old 02-21-2018, 07:27 PM
 
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Couple of guys on our base in nam sent home for pellet guns. There were always a bunch of rats at night under the perimeter lights looking for food. these guys would stay awake by shooting em during the night. I always what the postal workers thought of a combat soldier asking for a pellet gun in a war zone.......
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Old 02-21-2018, 08:44 PM
 
Location: TX and NM on the border of the Great Southwest.
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We used to take a short nap in the intake of F-100s and on the speed brake of the F-111s. Between flights of course.
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Old 02-21-2018, 08:53 PM
Status: "Living the good retired life." (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
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I was C-130 aircrew and we would put our beer in the open void in the cargo door, just aft of the ramp. When we got to our destination it would be nice and cold. A perfect way to end the day!


When we were in Uganda for the Rwanda famine relief effort in 1994 we were put up in the Kampala Sheraton and everyone did their laundry in the bathroom sink or tub and hung it on the balcony railing to dry. Management must have been horrified, because a few days later we came back from that day's flight and every room had a clothes line installed over the bathtub. Kampala also got its first public laundromat while we were there, although I'm sure that's a coincidence.
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Old 02-21-2018, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
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When V Corps was in Frankfurt the Frankfurt American H.S. was on the Abrams Complex, which we, the 109th MP Co guarded.

We all a fought to work the night of the prom because it was a lot of fun to drag couples out from under the bushes and all sorts of cozy, dark places. Then we had the fun of calling the parents to come pick up their kids.

Our PX complex had been bombed, so security was high and we had to search every vehicle that came onto the grounds. We were out in all weather, but it was particularly miserable when it was raining. The drivers were required to get out of their vehicle and open their hoods and trunks.

Now, this sort of behavior would not be tolerated today, but when a driver would barely open their window and dangle their keys at us, asking if we could open up the car, since the driver didn't want to get wet. We would signal 3 or 4 other MPs from the guard shack and have the driver stand to the side whilst we stripped his vehicle from everything the interior of the car and trunk (seats, carpets, bags, etc).

We would then thank the driver for the cooperation and instruct the driver to move his vehicle and stuff the the side, so that the driver could reassemble the vehicle. The drivers that had been behind the stripped vehicle were quick to step out of their vehicles and were so very helpful.
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Old 02-22-2018, 12:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I was C-130 aircrew and we would put our beer in the open void in the cargo door, just aft of the ramp. When we got to our destination it would be nice and cold. A perfect way to end the day!


When we were in Uganda for the Rwanda famine relief effort in 1994 we were put up in the Kampala Sheraton and everyone did their laundry in the bathroom sink or tub and hung it on the balcony railing to dry. Management must have been horrified, because a few days later we came back from that day's flight and every room had a clothes line installed over the bathtub. Kampala also got its first public laundromat while we were there, although I'm sure that's a coincidence.
In 1991 during Desert Storm the admiral authorized each sailor to have two cans of beer. Not all beer was cold to their taste. In comes the CO2 fire extinguisher. Quick blast and your beer is ice cold. I wasn’t a drinker so I sold my two cans for $20 a can. Some guys were smarter. They waited till all the beer was gone and raised the price. Some got into a bidding war. Dangerous game because he could have charges and get busted down in rank.
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Old 02-22-2018, 04:06 AM
 
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Melanie's post above reminded me of how things went from the other side of security at times.

Occasionally in Korea our guard dogs needed to be taken to the vet at another compound about twenty miles away so one old sergeant always made the trip worthwhile for himself. He'd get to the PX and buy a few cases of beer which would be loaded into the 1 1/4 ton pickup before the big aluminum crate with the dog was put in. At the gate the MP who was supposed to make sure nothing was being smuggled out always had a big surprise when he started to throw back the rear curtain and the guard dog did what guard dogs do. A few blocks into the village and we'd make a quick detour to drop off the beer at his "girlfriend's" house.
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Old 02-22-2018, 04:07 AM
 
489 posts, read 194,541 times
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Originally Posted by jeffdoorgunner View Post
Couple of guys on our base in nam sent home for pellet guns. There were always a bunch of rats at night under the perimeter lights looking for food. these guys would stay awake by shooting em during the night. I always what the postal workers thought of a combat soldier asking for a pellet gun in a war zone.......
LOL. That is a riot. Nobody thought of just using an M60 machine gun? Joking of course. Thanks for your service over there.
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